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The General Characteristics of the Early Modern Period

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Etel Loza

on 13 September 2013

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Transcript of The General Characteristics of the Early Modern Period

The General Characteristics of the Early Modern Period
The General Characteristics of the Early Modern Period.
The Renaissance.
The Reformation.
The Emergence of England as a sea power.

Closing Activity
The General Characteristics of the Early Modern Period.
THE RENAISSANCE
THE REFORMATION
THE EMERGENCE OF ENGLAND AS A MARITIME POWER
EARLY MODERN PERIOD

16th and 17th centuries
Medieval Times
Modern Times
Modernity

Period of Excitement
and Opportunity.
Period of Poverty
and Social Problems.
Modernity in this period is associated with the ideals about social identity and language which were associated with the intellectual and political developments in Europe (1500-1900).
Conditions that came into play:
THE PRINTING PRESS
THE RAPID SPREAD OF POPULAR EDUCATION
THE INCREASED COMMUNICATION AND MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
THE GROWTH OF
SPECIALIZED
KNOWLEDGE
THE EMERGENCE OF VARIOUS FORMS OF SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS ABOUT THE LANGUAGE
INDIVIDUAL
LEVEL
PUBLIC
LEVEL
EFFECTS UPON GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY
RADICAL
CONSERVATIVE
in matters of
vocabulary

promotes change
in matters of
grammar
preserves the existing status
THE REVIVAL OF LEARNING

THE REBIRTH OF THE CLASSICS

IT STARTED IN ITALY IN THE 15TH C
1500-
35000 books spread around Europe in Latin.
1500-1640-
20000 items in English were printed.
FRANCIS
BACON
THOMAS
MORE
Scientific
Revolution
'desperado'
'embargo'
'bigot'
'detail'
'cupola'
'portico'
'stucco'
Inkhorn
terms
16th c
Religious movement against the Roman
Catholic doctrine and practice
break away of England from the
Roman Catholic faith.
Henry VIII, who was married to Catherine
of Aragon, had only one daughter, Mary Tudor.
He fell in love with Anne. He requested Pope
Clement VII the annulment of his marriage
with Catherine of Aragon.
The pope refused and the Archbishop of Canterbury declared Henry's marriage to Catherine invalid. The king married Anne Boleyn.
ACT OF SUPREMACY 1834
Henry was declared the supreme head of the Church of England. This really meant that Henry was breaking away from Rome
and that the English Church was separating from the Church of Rome. The monarch became the political and religious ruler of the country.
The reformation was put into effect by means of a series of acts passed by parliament. The most important aims were:
To check the abuses of the Church.
To stop some of the practices by which priest had been enriching themselves (plurality, high fees for the different sacraments).
To acquire all the lands and possessions of the church (dissolution of monasteries).



The reformation was in essence a religious movement, however, its connotations were seen in different fields:





In the
social field
, it meant a reaction of the laymen against the clergy, against the worldliness and the greed of the church.
In the
economic field
, due to the dissolution of the monasteries, it contributed to the consolidation of the higher middle classes who bought the church lands.
The Reformation heightened National Spirit. People began to feel devotion and affection for the church of England simply because it was a National Church. The English people identified the new religion with patriotism and national independence, since it meant release from continental dominion.

Elizabeth I (1558-1603)

Defeat of the Spanish Armada 1588

The defeat of the Spanish Armada was during the Reign of
Elizabeth I and it was a turning point in the history of England.
England emerged as leader of the seas and as the world’s
most powerful nation. The victory gave the English people
a new sense of pride and self-confidence; they feared no one.

James I and the Authorized version of the Bible_ 1611

After Elizabeth I died childless in 1603, James VI of Scotland became
James I of England.

The new king wrote and spoke Scots, but his policy was to unite the two kingdoms with English.

Of all the ways in which James left his mark on the English language, none was to match the influence of the new translation of the Bible in 1611.
James I Bible is considered one of the great Renaissance masterpieces, whose impact on the History of Language has been fundamental as Shakespeare’s.
After the Bible was translated into English, every man who spoke the language could have access to it.
The Great Bible (1539)

The Publication of the first authorized English translation of the Bible has been regarded as a decisive moment in the creation of a Standard English.
So great was the influence of the King James I Bible that many
of the most common English sayings come directly from it:

A leopard cannot change its spots

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush

A wolf’s in sheep’s clothing

An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth

William Caxton- 1476
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