Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Freedom of Expression

No description
by

Timothy Lin

on 3 January 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Freedom of Expression

Freedom of Expression
First Amendment of the U.S. Bill of Rights
Thesis
Freedom of expression is the most essential of all freedoms and rights, and it is key to a truly free and democratic society, so freedom of expression of all types should be guaranteed protection by all governments. Freedom of speech should not be absolute, however, and a universal declaration listing the allowed restrictions of freedom of speech should be posted by the UN or a similar international organization and abided by all nations.

What is freedom of expression?
The right to express one's ideas and opinions freely without being persecuted or censored.
Freedom of expression can be divided into 5 types...
United States
Ranking: #46

Finland
Ranking: #1
Netherlands
Ranking: #2
Norway
Ranking: #3
Luxembourg
Ranking: #4
Andorra:
Ranking: #5
Liechtenstein
Ranking: #6
Denmark
Ranking: #7
Iceland
Ranking: #8
New Zealand
Ranking: #8
Sweden
Ranking: #10
Estonia
Ranking: #11
Austria
Ranking: #12
Czech Republic
Ranking: #13
Germany:
Ranking: #14
Switzerland:
Ranking: #15
Ireland
Ranking: #16
Jamaica
Ranking: #17
Canada
Ranking: #18

Poland
Ranking: #19
Slovakia
Ranking: #20
Costa Rica
Ranking: #21
Namibia
Ranking: #22
Belgium
Ranking: #23
Cape Verde
Ranking: #24
Cyprus
Ranking: #25
Uruguay
Ranking: #26
Ghana
Ranking: #27
Australia
Ranking: #28

Belize
Ranking: #29
Portugal
Ranking: #30
Suriname
Ranking: #31
Lithuania
Ranking: #32
United Kingdom
Ranking: #33
Slovenia
Ranking: #34
Spain
Ranking: #35
Mexico
Ranking: #152
Brazil
Ranking: #111

France
Ranking: #39
Italy
Ranking: #49
Cuba
Ranking: #170
Antigua and Barbuda
Ranking: #36
Latvia
Ranking: #37
El Salvador
Ranking: #38
Samoa
Ranking: #40
Botswana
Ranking: #41
South Africa
Ranking: #42
Trinidad and Tobago
Ranking: #43
Papua New Guinea
Ranking: #44
Romania
Ranking: #45
Haiti
Ranking: #47
Niger
Ranking: #48
Taiwan
Ranking: #50
Malta
Ranking: #51
Burkina Faso
Ranking: #52
Comoros
Ranking: #53
Serbia
Ranking: #54
Argentina
Ranking: #55
Moldova
Ranking: #56
South Korea
Ranking: #57
Chile
Ranking: #58
Japan
Ranking: #59
Mauritania
Ranking: #60
Hong Kong
Ranking: #61
Senegal
Ranking: #62
Tonga
Ranking: #63
Hungary
Ranking: #64
Croatia
Ranking: #65
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Ranking: #66
Guyana
Ranking: #67
Dominican Republic
Ranking: #68
Tanzania
Ranking: #69
Mauritius
Ranking: #70
Nicaragua
Ranking: #71
Sierra Leone
Ranking: #72
Malawi
Ranking: #73
Lesotho
Ranking: #74
Benin
Ranking: #75
Togo
Ranking: #76
Timor Leste
Ranking: #77
Armenia
Ranking: #78
Mozambique
Ranking: #79
Kosovo
Ranking: #80
Madagascar
Ranking: #81
Republic of the Congo
Ranking: #82
Georgia
Ranking: #84
Albania
Ranking: #85
Guinea Bissau
Ranking: #86
Panama
Ranking: #87
Mongolia
Ranking: #88
Liberia
Ranking: #89
Kenya
Ranking: #90
Kuwait
Ranking: #91
Bhutan
Ranking: #92
Zambia
Ranking: #93
Bolivia
Ranking: #94
Ecuador
Ranking: #95
Israel
Ranking: #96
Kyrgyzstan
Ranking: #97
Gabon
Ranking: #98
Greece
Ranking: #99
Bulgaria
Ranking: #100
Cote d'Ivoire
Ranking: #101

Guinea
Ranking: #102
Peru
Ranking: #104
Paraguay
Ranking: #105
Lebanon
Ranking: #106
Fiji
Ranking: #107
Central African Republic
Ranking: #109
Uganda
Ranking: #110
Nigeria
Ranking: #112
Qatar
Ranking: #113
Montenegro
Ranking: #114
Tajikistan
Ranking: #114
Venezuela
Ranking: #116
Brunei
Ranking: #117
United Arab Emirates
Ranking: #118
South Sudan
Ranking: #119
Nepal
Ranking: #120
Algeria
Ranking: #121
Mali
Ranking: #122
Macedonia
Ranking: #123
Angola
Ranking: #124
Guatemala
Ranking: #125
Colombia
Ranking: #126
Ukraine
Ranking: #127
Afghanistan
Ranking: #128
Honduras
Ranking: #129
Thailand
Ranking: #130
Cameroon
Ranking: #131
Indonesia
Ranking: #132

Tunisia
Ranking: #133
Oman
Ranking: #134
Zimbabwe
Ranking: #135
Morocco
Ranking: #136
Libya
Ranking: #137
Palestine
Ranking: #138
Chad
Ranking: #139
India
Ranking: #140
Jordan
Ranking: #141
Burundi
Ranking: #142
Ethiopia
Ranking: #143
Cambodia
Ranking: #144
Myanmar
Ranking: #145
Bangladesh
Ranking: #146
Malaysia
Ranking: #147
Russia
Ranking: #148

Philippines
Ranking: #149
Singapore
Ranking: #150
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Ranking: #151
Iraq
Ranking: #153
Turkey
Ranking: #154
Gambia
Ranking: #155
Swaziland
Ranking: #156
Belarus
Ranking: #157
Pakistan
Ranking: #158
Egypt
Ranking: #159
Azerbaijan
Ranking: #160
Kazakhstan
Ranking: #161

Rwanda
Ranking: #162
Bahrain
Ranking: #163
Saudi Arabia
Ranking: #164
Sri Lanka
Ranking: #165
Uzbekistan
Ranking: #166
Yemen
Ranking: #167
Equatorial Guinea
Ranking: #168
Djibouti
Ranking: #169
Laos
Ranking: #171
Sudan
Ranking: #172
Iran
Ranking: #173
Vietnam
Ranking: #174
Somalia
Ranking: #176
Syria
Ranking: #177
Turkmenistan
Ranking: #178
North Korea
Ranking: #179
Eritrea
Ranking: #180
China
Ranking: #175

Types of freedom of expression
Freedom of speech
Freedom of the press

Freedom of assembly
Freedom of petition
Freedom of religion
Why is freedom of expression important?
Provides a variety of viewpoints on issues.


Gives the right to inform and criticize.


Enables change and societal progress through progressive ideas and protests.
Without freedom of expression...
Democracy would be nonexistent; citizens would have no say in any governmental affairs.
Only one pro-government opinion would be allowed.
Society would be ignorant and misinformed by government propaganda.
Government would be able to get away with corruption, oppression, and tyranny.
No societal advancement.

"If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter." -

George Washington
Allows minorities and those with unpopular opinions to be heard and thus prevents tyranny of the majority.
Limits government power.
Measures the effectiveness of laws, and more broadly, the government itself.
The core of any free society.
Enables true participation in governmental affairs.
Protects all other human rights.
Freedom of expression enlightens the populace
Why is freedom of expression important?
Essential to democracy
Unfortunately, most people live a world without freedom of expression. Freedom of expression has been described as a "luxury of the West", with less than one billion people living in a country where the press freedom situation was satisfactory, according to Freedom House, an organization devoted to the protection of human rights worldwide.
Problems today
According to this map,
free
countries constitute only 14% of the world's population, 42% of people live in
partly free
countries, and a whopping 44% of the population lived in countries that are
not free.
North Korea: a totalitarian example
Ranked #179 in the Press Freedom Index, the second worst in the world after Eritrea.
Information that enters and exits the country is very tightly regulated.
No independent media, all forms of media run by the government. These media outlets
Leader Kim Jong-Un
North Korean propaganda showing soldier destroying the Capitol Building
exclusively broadcast propaganda, misinforming the people and developing xenophobia and extreme nationalism among the people.
China: subtle restriction
China is ranked #175 in the Press Freedom Index, one of the worst in the world and nearly as bad as North Korea.
However, China uses more subtle methods to gain control, and thus saves face with the Western world, as opposed to North Korea
Internet in China
China's constitution guarantees protection of the five types of freedom of expression, although this is far from the truth.
Freedom of the press is heavily restricted; there are few private media outlets because the government makes it difficult to create new media outlets by requiring licenses to operate one.
The government also restricts foreign media, making it difficult for foreign journalists to enter the country and blocking most foreign publications.
Similarly to the freedom of the press, China also requires a government license to protest.
Visualization of the "Great Firewall"
The system of Chinese internet censorship, dubbed "the Great Firewall" is the most comprehensive in the world, with more being spent on internal security than its own military.
China has the largest population of Internet users than any other country, with 618 million users logging on in 2013.
The social networking sites Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook are all blocked in China, and replaced by the government-owned Youku and Sina Weibo.
By Timothy Lin
China: subtle restriction cont.
Xinhua News Agency, the state-owned media outlet that controls a majority share of the Chinese media market
Freedom of the Press
A government who controls the freedom of the press controls the information its people have access to. Commonly used tactics include:
Censorship of media that challenges the government.
Banning of private media so the government is the only news source.
Harassment of journalists can lead to self-censorship.
For stubborn journalists committed to their cause, prison sentence or even assassinations
The Internet and Free Speech
In recent years, the Internet has become a very popular medium to express ideas with the ability to potentially reach millions of people around the world without needing to own a media outlet.
However, the Internet has also been a revolution for censorship too, with many countries using it as a propaganda tool while sealing off foreign influences and creating a socially isolated state.
What can be done?
Create a document that serves as an extension to Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Rights.
This document will outline the impermissible and admissible restrictions of freedom of expression.
Violations of this extension document will be treated as violations of human rights.
Conduct thorough annual investigations of state of affairs of press freedom for each country, to ensure that the declaration is being followed.
Admissible restrictions
Impermissible restrictions/practices
Prohibition of private media, or practices that discourage private media
Censorship of information of any kind (barring state secrets)
Restriction of free speech of any medium minus the admissible restrictions
Harassment, threatening, and assassinations of journalists
Usage of violent methods to break up protests
Commercial speech
Public defamation (libel/slander)
Copyright violations
Public disclosure of state secrets
Speech that poses a plausible threat to the safety of the public
Speech that intentionally incites violence
Hate Speech
Defined as any form of expression that attacks a protected individual or group, usually on the basis of their background (race, religion, sexual orientation, etc.)
Pros of legalizing hate speech
Cons of legalizing hate speech
Speech is meant to persuade, so naturally hate speech spreads hate and bigotry.
When hate is spread, violence is more likely to follow.
Prohibiting hate speech is censoring an opinion, contrary to the very idea of freedom of expression.
Just because an opinion may not appeal to the public interest, doesn't
"I disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it"
- Patrick Henry
mean the government must protect us from it.

Who is the government to decide what constitutes hate?
If we are to become a progressive and tolerant society, condoning bigoted attacks will not help.
What can you do?
SPEAK UP!!!
Questions?
Full transcript