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Disaster at Sea

The Unnatural HAZZARDZ!!!
by

Sayooj Samuel

on 30 August 2015

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Transcript of Disaster at Sea

The bloody WILD fights...
“I am longing to be with you, and by the sea, where we can talk together freely and build our castles in the air.”
- Bram Stoker, Dracula
BERMUDA TRIANGLE : THE ARENA OF DEATH
WHAT ARE THE CAUSES?
BERMUDA TRIANGLE
Captain error often goes hand-in-hand with bad weather, where high winds and crushing waves
can push ships off course into shallower waters. These terrible conditions usually make ship movement more difficult and one wrong turn by a captain can spell disaster. But sometimes, bad weather has nothing to do with shipping accidents at all, and the blame can be pinned on the captain of the ship alone.
The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, is a loosely defined region in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean, where a number of aircraft and ships are said to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. According to the US Navy, the triangle does not exist, and the name is not recognized by the US Board on Geographic Names.
$1.25
THE WONDERS TODAY
CLASS XI A
The Unsinkable Titanic
RMS TITANIC
WE ARE NOT AFRAID TO DIE...
Deep in Ocean: RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of 15 April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK, to New York City, US. The sinking resulted in the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history.
In 1898 (14 years prior to the Titanic tragedy), Morgan Robertson wrote a novel called Futility. This fictitious novel was about the largest ship ever built hitting an iceberg in the Atlantic ocean on a cold April night. The fictional ship (named Titan) and the real ship Titanic were similar in design and their circumstances were remarkably alike. Both ships were labeled "unsinkable".
DISASTER AT SEA
AVIATION DISASTERS
Flight 19 was a training flight of five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers that disappeared on December 5, 1945, while over the Atlantic. The flight never returned to base. One of the search and rescue aircraft deployed to look for them, a PBM Mariner with a 13-man crew, also disappeared. A tanker off the coast of Florida reported seeing an explosion and observing a widespread oil slick when fruitlessly searching for survivors. The weather was becoming stormy by the end of the incident.
MAJOR SHIPWRECKs
1822
Dec. 6, 1917
Jan. 30, 1945
Dec. 20, 1987
Sept. 26, 2002
The Tek Sing
In 1822, the Chinese sailing vessel, or junk, called the Tek Sing ran aground on a reef on the way to Indonesia. The ship was bringing a haul of porcelain to the then-Dutch colony, but also held a crew of 200 and around 1,600 Chinese immigrants bound for the islands.
April 14, 1912
The Halifax Harbor Disaster
One of the most disastrous maritime accidents in history was felt on land. On Dec. 6, 1917, an ammunition-loaded French cargo ship, the SS Mont-Blanc, collided with the Norwegian steamship
the SS Imo. The result was an
enormous explosion that killed
close to 2,000 people and
injured at least 9,000 more.
The Doña Paz
The Philippine passenger ferry the Doña Paz collided with an oil tanker on Dec. 20, 1987. Within two hours, the ferry was below the waves and as many as 4,375 people were dead.
The MV Wilhelm Gustloff
The German hospital ship the MV Wilhelm Gustloff set sail on its final voyage from Gdynia, Poland, to Kiel, Germany, where they were to evacuate German refugees, in the last days of World War II. The official passenger manifest listed 6,050 people on board, but many civilians had boarded without being recorded. In fact, an estimated 10,582 passengers and crew were on the doomed ship.
RMS TITANIC
Perhaps the most famous shipwreck in history, the loss of the RMS Titanic killed slightly more than 1,500 passengers and crew when it struck an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912. Although the Titanic carried more lifeboats than legally required at the time, there were far from enough seats to save everyone on board.
The Le Joola
Flight 19
VISIT THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE TODAY!
FLY TO BERMUDA TRIANGLE AND NEVER COME BACK!
Visit: BERMUDA TRIANGLE
then (HEAVEN or HELL)

7 Days & 6 Nights
Where They Met Their Death..Still There
RESCUE EFFORTS
In the case of an air disaster occurring on, or in the immediate vicinity of, an airport (generally within a 5 kilometre radius), control of the incident is the responsibility of the airport authorities since control of the air traffic is the responsibility of the airport in question and the control tower is in charge of warning the security and intervention services. Generally the special disaster rescue plans (red alert, special plans for the airport) will only be activated with the agreement of the competent political authorities.
A SINKING CRUISE SHIP
ENGLISH ACTIVITY
DISASTER AT SEA
XI-A
At least 1,863 people died when the Sengegalese ferry the MV Le Joola capsized on Sept. 26, 2002. The wreck happened in rough seas during a storm off the coast of The Gambia. In less than five minutes, the ship went down. Not all passengers had tickets, so an exact death toll is difficult to come by, but there were only 64 survivors pulled from the sea.
High winds on the ocean can cause severe problems for commercial shipping, pushing the ships into shallower waters where the possibility of grounding is significantly increased.
BAD WEATHER
CAPTIAN ERROR
SARIKA PRAKASH
ABHIJITH R B
ABHIJIT O P
DEEPIKA K
VISHNU V KUMAR
SIDHYA S
VARSHA M
AKSHAY
SAYOOJ SAMUEL

THE LEADER
RELATED BOOKS
TITANIC
FATAL FORECAST
ABANDON SHIP!
TRAPPED UNDER THE SEA
THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE
SEA!!!
NEWS AT FUTURE PAST
Full transcript