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Inventions of China and How They Affect us Today

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Lydia Black

on 4 December 2013

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Transcript of Inventions of China and How They Affect us Today

Inventions of China and How They Affect us Today
The Compass
The compass was a wonderful invention that changed the world of discovery forever. The compass was originally invented in Ancient China. The Ancient Chinese compass went from having a giant lodestone needle, to a much smaller steel needle greatly increasing accuracy. The compass made sea voyages much easier, because the need for landmarks was practically diminished. In conclusion the compass greatly helped guide the way for many explorers of the time.
Small Pox Inoculation
You probably would not think a method used to cure diseases all over the world today came from Ancient China, but it did. Small Pox inoculation was invented to save many people from Small Pox disease in Ancient China. A brief description of the process is taking a bit of the virus, and injecting it into somebody that has not been affected, therefore giving them immunity. Small Pox almost wiped out Ancient China, inoculation saved them. To wrap it up inoculation was revolutionary and has been very helpful to cure modern diseases.
The clock has changed the world in many ways, and it all started with the mechanical clock in Ancient China. You probably would not guess the first clock was built in Ancient China, at that time called the mechanical clock. Well it was and it also ran off of hydro energy, or as most would say water. It started off as a big, bulky, and very complex piece of machinery that helped evolve clocks today. All in all the mechanical clock was a great invention, that helped create the very ones we use today.
Inoculation Today
It is amazing that a method made so long ago like Small Pox inoculation can still be used to cure diseases today. We have people getting flu shots everyday using the same system. When swine flu broke out we still used the method to inject the virus into disease free people. The point being everyday somebody gets what I call an anti- shot to cure some disease. In conclusion we should probably thank Ancient China, because without them human race would have a very small population, or possibly even be extinct.
The Mechanical Clock
Clocks Today
Even though clocks were invented way back then they are still a daily essential that we still use today. Many adjustments have been made to the clock since Ancient times, like they no longer run on water. The Modern clock runs off of chemical energy from batteries, and are much more compact. Today we can find clocks in everywhere from alarms to our t.v. screens. In the end our lives run on a schedule and the clock is possibly the best thing to happen to us.
Even though the compass was invented in Ancient China it has helped shaped the modern world in many ways. Today's compass is smaller, lighter weight, and more efficient than those from ancient times. We still use a compass to find our way on a trip or in a new place. There are still regular compasses, but it has evolved into something bigger known as GPS. To sum it up the compass has had an affect in shaping the world today.
The Modern Compass
This Prezi was made by Lydia Black
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