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7th Grade - Week 17

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by

Carrie Cook

on 27 April 2018

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Transcript of 7th Grade - Week 17

Science Warm-Ups
Tuesday - Don't Make Your Matrix Wimpy
Monday - Diary of a Decision Matrix
7th Grade
Week 17
Thursday - Diary of Science Knowledge
Friday - Diary of a Diverse Science Community
Wednesday - Diary of a Wimpy Claim
Monday - Diary of a Decision Matrix
Tuesday - Don't Make Your Matrix Wimpy
Wednesday - Diary of a Wimpy Claim
Thursday - Diary of Science Knowledge
Friday - Diary of a Diverse Science Community
He doesn't want his cell model to be wimpy, so he does what engineers do.... he makes himself a decision matrix.
Greg has to make a model of a cell and has several ideas of what he wants to build.
A decision matrix is a chart that compares ideas based on certain criteria. This helps engineers choose what idea to build and test first.
Answer the questions on your Warm-Up sheet.
1. What design criteria was important to Greg?
3. Which idea should Greg build?
2. How are the criteria rated?
1. What design criteria was important to Greg?
2. How are the criteria rated?
3. Which idea should Greg build?
Manny was having a problem remembering the combination to his locker. He came up with these possible solutions:

Put a sticker on his locker with his combination.
Change the combination lock to a fingerprint scanner.
Change the combination lock to a lock with a key.
Don't shut the door all the way.
These are the criterion he is going to use to evaluate the solutions:
cost
privacy
ease of use
reliability
On your Warm-Up sheet, rate the criterion according to importance. 1 being least important and 4 being most important.
He wanted to make a decision matrix to help him evaluate each possible solution.
Solutions:

Put a sticker on his locker with his combination.
Change the combination lock to a fingerprint scanner.
Change the combination lock to a lock with a key.
Don't shut the door all the way.
These are the criterion he is going to use to evaluate the solutions:
cost
privacy
ease of use
reliability
Then explain why you rated them that way.
Why?
Rodrick was drinking a 5-Hour Energy drink and Greg asked him why?
Rodrick said that the company ads claim that it increases your energy, without making you jumpy like too much caffeine, or crash later on like you do with sugar.
The ads also boast a 67% success rate from its users, and that it does not contain any ingredient that will cause a "significant illness or injury if used as directed".
Greg was skeptical of this claim and did some research. He found out that in 2014 the company that makes the energy drink was sued by the Attorney General in Washington State over false claims.
On your Warm-Up sheet, explain why consumers should question the data presented by advertisers.
The evidence provided court included:
13 deaths and 33 hospitalizations linked to the drink.
Substances that could be toxic in large amounts were ingredients in the drink.
The company's own study on the energy drink showed the opposite effects of what it claimed.
The energy drink company was ordered to pay $4.3 million dollars in penalties and fees for deceptive advertising.
What do you think?
Fregley wants to know how science knowledge is gathered.
Help him out by matching the examples with the appropriate science practice. Write the letters on the lines on your Warm-Up sheet. (Some may be used more than once, some may not be used.
a. Analyzing and Interpreting Data
h. Asking Questions
g. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
f. Arguing from Evidence
e. Communicating Information
d. Using Math and Computational Thinking
c. Developing and Using Models
b. Constructing Explanations
Science Practices
Examples
1. Wondering about an observation.
2. Publishing an article on atoms.
3. Using a graph to explain a relationship between potential and kinetic energy.
4. Presenting evidence that goes against someone's claim.
5. Using the results of a scientific test to tell someone about how water changes from a liquid to a gas.
Examples
Science Practices
1. Wondering about an observation.
2. Publishing an article on atoms.
3. Using a graph to explain a relationship between potential and kinetic energy.
4. Presenting evidence that goes against someone's claim.
5. Using the results of a scientific test to tell someone about how water changes from a liquid to a gas.
a. Analyzing and Interpreting Data
b. Constructing Explanations
c. Developing and Using Models
d. Using Math and Computational Thinking
e. Communicating Information
f. Arguing from Evidence
g. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
h. Asking Questions
Patty was surprised when she learned that diversity among scientists is really important.
The cartoons represent different benefits of having diversity among scientists that work together.
On your Warm-Up sheet, choose one of the cartoons and explain how science is benefited by having different perspectives.
A
B
C
A
B
C
Full transcript