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Poetry Basics and Figurative Language

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Sarah Floyd

on 19 March 2014

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Transcript of Poetry Basics and Figurative Language

By: Brooke Niesen and Lydia Voura
Teaching Poetic Devices
and Figurative Language
Through Song Lyrics

Common Reactions
to Poetry
"Ughhh do we have to start poetry today?"
"Why are we doing this? Poetry sucks!"
"Poetry is boring!"
"Poetry is stupid and doesn't make sense."
"I don't get poetry."
"Can we watch a movie instead?"
Rationale
Use of poetic devices and figurative language makes writing more vivid, exciting, descriptive, and interesting.

Understanding the use of these devices and figurative language helps students interpret the mood, meaning, and theme of poetry.

Students often feel intimidated when studying poetry, so introducing poetic devices and figurative language in song lyrics eases students into the poetry unit.
Curriculum Expectations
Met
Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics
http://youtu.be/5TI18KxwbMk
“Firework” by Katy Perry
Examples:
Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.
Surrounded by water in the ocean, but none of it is drinkable.
The directions were as clear as mud.
Obviously, they weren’t very clear directions).
Irony/ Paradox
Examples:
When the game is over, a true champion we’ll discover.
“over” and “discover”
What would I have to prove, to show you how much I love?
“prove” and “love”
Rhyme: Eye Rhyme
Examples:
Bright night, a full moon above.
“bright” and “night”
We will stay today and then we must go.
“stay” and “today”
Rhyme: Internal Rhyme
EXAMPLE: "Not my bones" by Marilyn Nelson

You are not your
body,
you are not your
bones.
What's essential about you
Is what can't be owned
6. Repetition
13. Onomatopoeia
Examples:
"is a d
i
amond bl
i
nd in the black belly of coal"
-The repetition of the i sound in diamond and blind
A t
ur
tle in the f
er
tile soil.
-Repetition of the “er” sound in “turtle” “fertile”
12. Assonance
9. Alliteration
11. Personification
10. Metaphor
7. Simile
Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics
Poetic Devices
and Figurative Language


“Life After You”- Daughtry
“For What It’s Worth”-Buffalo Springfield
“Cowboy Casanova”- Carrie Underwood
“Domino”- Jessie J
Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics
Examples:
It’s hard work doing nothing.
Youth is wasted on the young.
The more we know, the less we understand.

8. Hyperbole
“Hope” is the thing with feathers -
That perches in the soul -
And sings the tune without the words -
And never stops - at all -

And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard -
And sore must be the storm -
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm -

I’ve heard it in the chillest land -
And on the strangest Sea -
Yet - never - in Extremity,
It asked a crumb - of me.
-Emily Dickinson
14. Extended Metaphor
Daughtry "Life After You"
Extended Activity #1
Daughtry
Handout
Poetic Devices and Figurative Language Handout
A comparison of two things (that may or not be alike) using the words like or as.
A comparison of two unlike things without using like or as. (Things = person, place, thing, or thought)
A type of metaphor in which non-human things or ideas possess human qualities or actions.
Where a sound, word, phrase or line is repeated for emphasis or unity.

Helps to reinforce meaning
When the truth is exaggerated (to emphasize something or for humorous purposes).
Overall Expectation•Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text
forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning
Specific Expectations
• identify a variety of text features and explain how they help
communicate meaning
• identify a variety of elements of style in texts, including increasingly complex texts, and explain how they help communicate meaning and enhance the effectiveness of the texts
divide class into groups (ideally 4 or 5 students per group)
provide each group with song lyrics
examples
Carrie Underwood "Cowboy Casanova"
Jessie J "Domino"
Katy Perry "Firework"
Buffalo Springfield “For What It’s Worth”
Have students identify, label, and explain the type of figurative language or poetic devices used in the song lyrics.
Extended
Activity #2
similar to activity #1
students are asked to find their own song lyrics and work independently
have students identify, label, and explain at least 4 types of figurative language or poetic devices used in the song lyrics.
to be handed in for an individual grade
Extended
Activity #3
a variation of Readers Theatre
students will determine a common theme and find lyrics with poetic devices/figurative language
students are asked to create a script compiling the song lyrics
students will present script to the class in a creative way
Theory
Questions?
Materials and
Resources
computer and projection screen (Power Point and YouTube Video)
poetic Devices Handout
Daughtry Assignment
lyrics for songs
computer lab
Benefits
Limitations
makes poetic devices and figurative language relatable and relevant
engages students
opportunity for students to take ownership over their work
poetry becomes less intimidating
eases students into poetry unit
students may have difficulty finding song lyrics containing poetic devices and figurative language
non-traditional approach to studying poetry
The repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words
Words where the sound echoes their meaning
An imitation of sound
(e.g., cuckoo, sizzle).
EXAMPLE - "Firework" by Katy Perry

Do you ever feel
like a plastic bag
Drifting through the wind, wanting to start again?
Do you ever feel, feel so paper thin
Like a house of cards
, one blow from caving in?
EXAMPLE: "Life is a Highway" by Tom Cochran

Life is a highway
I wanna ride it all night long
If you're going my way
I wanna drive it all night long
EXAMPLE: "The Music of the Night" by Andrew Lloyd Webber

Nighttime sharpens, heightens each sensation.
Darkness wakes and stir imagination.
Silently
the senses abandon their defenses
,
Helpless to resist the notes I write,
For I compose the Music of the Night.
EXAMPLE: "Boom Boom Pow" by the Black Eyed Peas

I'm on that supersonic
boom
Y'all hear that spaceship
zoom
When-when I step inside the room
Them girls go ape ape uh
Y'all stuck on super-8-8-8
That low-fi super 8 bit
I'm on that HD flat
This beat go
boom boom bap
.
EXAMPLE: "Alphabet Aerobics" by Blackalicious

Artificial amateurs, aren't at all amazing
Analytically
, I
assault, animate
things
Broken barriers bounded by
the
bomb beat
Buildings
are
broken, basically
I'm
bombarding...
EXAMPLE: "Grenade" by Bruno Mars

I'd catch a grenade for ya
Throw my hand on a blade for ya
I'd jump in front of a train for ya
You know I'd do anything for ya
Basics of Poetry
1. Lines
the most basic unit of poetry
May or may not be a complete sentence
Will vary in length
2. Stanza
Lines that appear in groups
Like a paragraph in stories
Each stanza is a separate emotion
or idea
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.

Imagine if your precious nose
were sandwiched in between your toes,
that clearly would not be a treat,
for you'd be forced to smell your feet.

Your nose would be a source of dread
were it attached atop your head,
it soon would drive you to despair,
forever tickled by your hair.

Within your ear, your nose would be
an absolute catastrophe,
for when you were obliged to sneeze,
your brain would rattle from the breeze.

Your nose, instead, through thick and thin,
remains between your eyes and chin,
not pasted on some other place--
be glad your nose is on your face!
Jack Prelutsky
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.

Imagine if your precious nose
were sandwiched in between your toes,
that clearly would not be a treat,
for you'd be forced to smell your feet.
3. Form
The poem's shape
How the words are laid out on the page
Can take ANY form possible
5. Rhythm
The pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in each line
like the
beat
of a
song
or the
beat
of the
drum
4. Rhyme
Repetition of sounds at the ends of words
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.

Imagine if your precious nose
were sandwiched in between your toes,
that clearly would not be a treat,
for you'd be forced to smell your feet.
Like me and see
This pattern is called the rhyme scheme
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.

Imagine if your precious nose
were sandwiched in between your toes,
that clearly would not be a treat,
for you'd be forced to smell your feet.
A
A
B
B

C
C
D
D
Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
for if it were where it is not,
you might dislike your nose a lot.

Imagine if your precious nose
were sandwiched in between your toes,
that clearly would not be a treat,
for you'd be forced to smell your feet.

Your nose would be a source of dread
were it attached atop your head,
it soon would drive you to despair,
forever tickled by your hair.

Within your ear, your nose would be
an absolute catastrophe,
for when you were obliged to sneeze,
your brain would rattle from the breeze.

Your nose, instead, through thick and thin,
remains between your eyes and chin,
not pasted on some other place--
be glad your nose is on your face!
Jack Prelutsky
4th Stanza of Firework
Baby,
you're a firework
Come on, let your colours burst
Make 'em go, "Aah, aah, aah"
You're gonna leave 'em all in awe, awe, awe

6th Stanza of Firework
You don't have to feel like a wasted space
You're original, cannot be replaced
If you only knew
what the future holds
After a hurricane comes a rainbow
2nd Stanza of Firework
Do you ever feel already buried deep
six
feet under?
Screams
but no one
seems
to hear a thing
Do you know that there's still a chance for you
'Cause there's a spark in you?
7th Stanza of Firework
Maybe a reason why all the doors are cl
o
sed
So you could open one that leads you to the perfect r
oa
d
Like a lightning bolt, your heart will glow
And when it's time you'll know 


8th Stanza of Firework
Boom, boom, boom
Even brighter than the moon, moon, moon
It's always been inside of you, you, you
And now it's time to let it through-ough-ough
The repetition of vowel sounds in non-rhyming words
1st Stanza of Firework
Do you ever feel like a plastic bag
Drifting through the wind, wanting to start again?Do you ever feel, feel so paper thin
Like a house of cards, one blow from
caving in?
"We Real Cool"
By Gwendolyn Brooks

The Pool Players.
Seven at the Golden Shovel.

We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We
Die soon.
A metaphor that is extended over the length of the poem and compares in several ways
This poem takes the idea of hope and extends it to a bird using these metaphors:
-Feathers
-singing
-Being heard all over
-Sore in hard times
-Asking for a crumb
Full transcript