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PLAGIARISM

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by

Kim Glimmerjade

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of PLAGIARISM

That's why you need a booster shot.
PLAGIARISM
is an epidemic on this campus

History has a zero tolerance policy:
PLAGIARISM
...
Violates the relationship of trust between faculty and students and among students
Causes actual harm within academic community
Devalues genuine achievements and the integrity of scholarship

When do students plagiarize?
GOING VIRAL


Procrastination
Time management issues
Unclear about assignment or expectations
Feeling stressed out/pressure
Worried about responsibilities (family, financial, work etc.)
... you still have a
choice
!
Copying off the internet
IS
cheating
IF
you don't cite your source
Forms of the plagiarism bug:
Unauthorized collaboration: copying with or without permission
Paying for writing (from classmates, family, internet paper mills, etc.)
Re-using your own work

Outright cheating:
Most common mistakes History students make:
Don't know how to cite correctly or when to cite

Letting
stress
factors impinge on good judgment (late or last minute work, lots of stuff due at once)

You still have a
choice
!
Not sticking to the assignment -
Use only lecture notes and assigned texts

unless told to do additional research

Internet browsing and cutting and pasting
without keeping the citation together
with the copied text (
URL required!
)

"Unauthorized Collaboration"

Real life examples of painfully obvious cheating.
http://farmwars.info/?p=8410
Plagiarism and cheating will not be tolerated. All assignments performed for this course must be original and must be performed individually unless otherwise noted. Every incident of academic dishonesty will be strictly punished. The history department mandates that academic dishonesty be punished by
a failing grade for the course
. Additional sanctions may include a permanent record on your academic transcript and suspension or expulsion from the university. For more information on UA policies concerning academic integrity, please see:
http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/codeofacademicintegrity
“99% on a TurnItIn.com originality report. The only original thing was the student's name and date.”

Two students submit virtually identical papers
The student’s parent/ spouse/boyfriend/girlfriend/sibling…wrote the paper.

“The Middle Ages was a very eventful time in history. Throughout this period of time, many people suffered extreme hardships and endured multiple problems. Some so much so, that many medieval humanists considered this time period to be linked with intellectual and cultural deterioration…”

“The Middle Ages were an extremely hectic time in ancient history. During this period of time, many people suffered through extreme hardships and had to deal with many problems within the community and culture of the people.”

The bug is in the air:
"I just Googled it..."
"I put it in my own words,
so why is it cheating?"
Student
: “Before the Enlightenment, people had begun to move from rural areas to towns looking for freedom and prosperity. Trade and communication had improved during the Renaissance and many people realized that things didn’t have to continue on as they always had -- new governments could be formed, new laws passed, new businesses started.”

It doesn’t matter whether it’s
a one-page reading response worth ten points,
an in-class PowerPoint presentation, or
the final draft of your senior capstone paper...

Time for another meds check...
“…and I just forgot that I got that off the internet…”

“…and I just forgot to put in the citation…”
(how to)
Avoid it like the Plague
Online resources and tutorials
http://www.library.arizona.edu/help/tutorials/plagiarism/
http://www.library.arizona.edu/tutorials/accidental_plagiarism/
Citation Guides
Barbara Hacker guide to Chicago Style: http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch05_o.html
Chicago Manual of Style: http://www.library.arizona.edu/search/reference/citation-cms.html
CHECK YOUR MEDS:
*Sneeze*
How to avoid catching the bug...


"Expropriation of another author's text and the presentation of it as one's own"
The Statement of Standards of Professional Conduct
(Washington, DC.: American Historical Association, 2003), 10.
54% of all Academic Code violations are for plagiarism.

Website
: "During the late Middle Ages, peasants had begun to move from rural estates to the towns in search of increased freedom and prosperity. As trade and communication improved during the Renaissance, the ordinary town-dweller began to realize that things need not always go on as they had for centuries. New charters could be written, new governments formed, new laws passed, new businesses begun."
Student X found a picture on
Wiki that she copied into a slide for her group's powerpoint presentation.


Is this plagiarism?
Who in the group is responsible?
Should this be reported?
Are you getting sick?
it's still plagiarism.
Someone else wrote what’s on the internet.
Not you.

“I just needed some background info…”
Random Googling is not usually the best way to find good historical information about your subject.
"It's just one sentence..."
What is plagiarism?
(that goes for images too)
http://www.nww2m.com/2012/01/comfort-women/

Young “comfort woman” interviewed by an Allied officer after the Japanese surrender. © IWM (SE 4523)
Full transcript