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Digital Gospel

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by

Mark Sinclair

on 24 February 2017

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Transcript of Digital Gospel

Teaching the Teachers
Kosal
SIL Software Development Unit
Radio Club
Stories from Cambodia
Devotion
Background
History
Teaching
Business
Justice
Conclusions
Q&A
Prayer
Teaching
30 years of war, especially Khmer Rouge period (1975-9)
In just 4 years, 2 million Cambodians died in a population of 6 million
Khmer Rouge targeted intellectuals, including doctors, vets, teachers and academics, plus religious groups
Hence 60% Cambodians are under 30
Cambodian population now 14 million
Huge spiritual & developmental needs
The War
Digital Forensics
Teaching in Context
During the Khmer Rouge period, 3/4 of all school teachers and almost all university teachers were killed
Moreover, the schools and the books were destroyed
Education requires teachers; where can they be found?
Adults with 6 years of education could train for three months to teach primary; with 9 years education, and six months training, middle school; with 12 years education, and one year's training, high school
Gradually schools were rebuilt, first primary, and then increasingly middle and high schools
First Computer Science Bachelors degree, largely taught in English by Japanese academics, 1996-2000
RUPP MSc Computer Science
In 2001, RUPP had 2,000 undergraduate students of Computer Science
Thirty plus teachers, but only one with PhD and ten with overseas Masters
Started a part-time weekend Masters; in the week, teach undergraduates; at the weekend, the best, with me, teach the rest
Lots of challenges: background, academic standards, corruption
In the end, 18 of 48 pass, but ...
Q&A
Dr Mark C. Sinclair
Digital Gospel,
25 February 2017
Stories from Cambodia
Devotion
Background
History
Business
Justice
Conclusions
Prayer
Exploitation
Fifteen years ago, Cambodia was a country with very limited rule of law, one of the most corrupt countries in the world
Brothels could be found throughout the country, especially in the cities, with not only adults, but children - including very young girls - freely available
Foreigners - from West and East - would make use of the brothels, but also Cambodians in the cities for work or festivals
Police would take 'payment in kind' from the brothels for 'protection' and a girl who ran away might easily be returned by the police or even sold to another brothel
Video:
Transformation
Cambodia

Nehemiah 1-2:10
Background
Qualifications: BA, MA, MSc, PhD, CEng, MIET, MIEEE
Employment: GPT, Essex
Mark & Shirley
Mark & Shirley have been with OMF International since 2001.

They have served nine and a half years of that in Cambodia, with the rest in the UK in various roles.

They are now back on Home Assignment since August 2016, returning to Cambodia again in mid March 2017
Lisa is a Content Manager in Humanities at Cambridge University Press, in Cambridge (!)
Martin is in the third year of a five-year medical degree at St George's College, London in Tooting
Lisa & Martin
Calling
Process
Need
Prayer
Calling
Planning
Going
Implementation
Challenges
Video:
Enemies of
the People

Secondments
RUPP (2002-5), Computer Science
NPIC (2006-8), Computer Science
NPIC (2015-16), Computer Science & Telecomms
Engaging the University
Kosal, Head of Computer Science, NPIC
SIL Software Development Unit
NPIC Radio Club
Case Study:
Programming
Assessment

Programming
Assessment
How would you modify assessment to take acount of the cultural context?
Story:
Appointing a Java Lecturer

Initial Development Team
Closing up Shop
Khalibre
IPS Service Centre
In 2006, OMF had a legacy International Personnel System, developed using the 'serendipitous' model
Impossible to maintain, Intl Director of Personnel could not even tell how many children in OMF
Recruited an experienced programme manager
Introduced a more 'commercial' model: established business software framework (SAP), consultants to customise, some missionary effort in analysis, infrastructure & development lead; majority of development to be done by Cambodian programmers
I recruited and oversaw initial training, plus helped to set up Cambodian office as Resource Manager
Challenges
Staff recruitment and retention
Staff training and development
Power and internet: production servers had to be in Singapore
Cultural differences, both Cambodian vs Western, and missionary vs business IT
Khalibre now has multiple clients, not only building on SAP, but also developing its own lightweight framework
Khean
A Few Thoughts
Importance of Calling (passport days)
Learning as well as teaching
Unpredictability (the wind blows ...)
Not everything works out
People before structures
Sometimes adviser is better than leader
The Future
Heading back to Cambodia, via Singapore on 9 March
Planning a three-year term
NPIC: Computer Science (research) and Telecomms (teaching teachers)
IJM: programming & digital forensics
Personnel Manager for OMF Cambodia
Prayer
Cambodia, elections next year
NPIC
IJM
OMF Cambodia
Shirley and I, packing up & settling back in
Our children, my aging Mam and wider family, left behind
Where the wind blows ...
Challenges
Frog in a well
Knowledge inversion
Academic corruption
But in Cambodia, it's like this ...
Riding a water buffalo across the mud
Personal rather than professional motivation
Moonlighting
Personal vs organisational development
Fate of average students
But never forget the clever ones
Challenges
Time for training
Priority of training vs operational needs
Churn in foreign leadership
Changing focus of training
Personal vs organisational development
Full transcript