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Increasing Fruit and Vegetabe Intake Among Children Ages 8-12

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Leah Lopez

on 23 October 2014

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Transcript of Increasing Fruit and Vegetabe Intake Among Children Ages 8-12

Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Children Ages 8-11 years old at Glen Park Elementary School
By Leah Lopez and Christina LoBue
Project Goals and Objectives
Overall goal: Promote sustainable behavioral change that will enhance the wellness of children by preventing childhood/adulthood obesity and chronic diseases often acquired in adulthood.

Objective #1: By the end of the intervention, it's expected that fruit and vegetable intakes will increase by at least one fruit and one vegetable per day.

Objective #2.1: By the end of the intervention, the students will be able to demonstrate knife safety by using the claw method.

Objective #2.2: After the second class, the students will feel more confident using a knife safely.

Class One: Myplate/Knife Safety
Conclusion
Figure 1. Pre- and post-assessment question:
Can I use a knife safely? Twelve students responded to the pre-assessment and twelve students responded to the post-assessment.

Figure 5. The twelve participants were asked to recall the amount of fruits and vegetables they consumed on the previous day. Serving sizes were not taught and perceived amounts were subjective. Fruits and vegetables were not defined on the post-assessment (i.e., culinary versus botany definitions).

Figure 5. The twelve participants were asked to recall the amount of fruits and vegetables they consumed on the previous day. Serving sizes were not taught and perceived amounts were subjective. Fruits and vegetables were not defined on the post-assessment (i.e., culinary versus botany definitions).

Figure 3. Twelve participants were asked to rank their preference for fruits and vegetables in separate pre-assessment questions. Both questions were ranked on a 5-point scale.

Figure 3 highlights the twelve participants’ perceived desirability of fruits and vegetables.


Figure 5. The twelve participants were asked to recall the amount of fruits and vegetables they consumed on the previous day. Serving sizes were not taught and perceived amounts were subjective. Fruits and vegetables were not defined on the post-assessment (i.e., culinary versus botany definitions).

Figure 3. Twelve participants were asked to rank their preference for fruits and vegetables in separate pre-assessment questions.
Both questions were ranked on a 5-point scale.
Figure 3 highlights the twelve participants’ perceived desirability of fruits and vegetables.

Figure 4. The post-assessment questions asked twelve students if their fruit and vegetable intake had changed from the first class.
Serving sizes were not taught and perceived amounts were subjective. Both questions were ranked on a 3-point scale.

Grant Funders

Make sure that we have enough knowledge about the population so that we can better educate them and prepare classes that would be challenging for the kids.

Inquire about current lectures in school about health and nutrition and ensure that children will be able to connect and make practical applications through our classes.
What would we have done differently next time?

Lesson 3: Grains

Kids learned about anatomy of a grain and made their own oatmeal using a variety nuts, seeds and dried fruits
Lesson 4: Healthy Snacking

The kids learned about healthy snacking and about the sugar content of popular beverages. They were also taught how to make cucumber cups and avocado yogurt
Lesson 5: Portion Sizes

Share Our Strengths focuses more on the long term solutions to address child hunger than merely addressing children’s immediate
hunger needs by food hand outs.
Walmart Foundation is committed in increasing nutrition literacy and equipping people with food and cooking skills. The foundation is a current sponsor of Cooking Matters which will be similar to our long-term community program
DCYF's grants funds to afterschool programs at school sites (among other community locations) and has made large investments of more than $15 million annually to "out of school time" activities in more than 200 programs across SF

Grant Funders
Thank you!!!
GPE School: 50% Hispanic
Nutrition Intervention: 58% Hispanic
What is the current state of the United States?
1/2 of adults have at least one chronic disease
1/4 adults have two or more chronic diseases
In 2009-2010, about 18% of children ages 6-11were obese, and 18% of adolescents ages 12-17 were obese
Mexican American (23%), and Black non-Hispanic (26%) children were more likely to be obese than White, non-Hispanic (15%) children
Lesson 2: Fruits and Vegetables Tasting Activity
Non-profit/ Program
Inspiration
The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step
-Lao Tzu
Full transcript