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Common Core and the IEP

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Eric Brewer

on 2 May 2014

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Transcript of Common Core and the IEP

Current
Special Education
Trends

Outcomes
Reminders, Encouragement, and Outcomes
Paradigm Shift
in IEPs
and Goal Writing
The Law:
Why Common Core
In the current iteration of IDEA, Congress states that the education of "students with disabilities can be made more effective by---
(A) having
high expectations
for such children and ensuring their
access to the general education curriculum
in the regular classroom, to the maximum extent possible, in order to---
(i) meet developmental goals and, to the maximum extent possible, the challenging expectations that have been established for all children" (§20 USC 1414).
IEP Meetings
Teaching Activities
Common Core
Thank you!
and the IEP
College and Career Readiness
Grade-level appropriate goals
Outcomes based
Grade-level Appropriate Goals
College and Career Readiness
Students with disabilities must be challenged to excel within the general education curriculum and be prepared for success in their post-school lives, including college and/or careers.
- Application to Students with Disabilities
Idaho Department of Education
Some students with the most significant cognitive disabilities will require substantial supports and accommodations to have meaningful access to certain standards in both instruction and assessment, based on their communication an academic needs. These supports and accommodations should ensure that students receive access to multiple means of learning and opportunities to demonstrate knowledge, but retain the rigor and high expectations of the Common Core State Standards.
Congress also expects the coordination of the education of students with disabilities with
"other local, educational service agency, State and Federal school improvement efforts, including improvement efforts under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, in order to ensure that such children benefit form such efforts and that special education can
become a service or such
for children
rather than a place where such children are sent
" (§20 USC 1414).
These sections of IDEA explicitly state Congress' demand that the
standards of the general education curriculum guide a students' IEP team
in developing the annual goals and the individualized instruction that will be provided to the student.

- North Dakota Department of Public Instruction
Compliance
Results Driven
Accountability
Compliant
only IEP
IEP that can
produce results
IEP team discussions center on identifying the current skills a child has and the next developmental skills he or she will need
However, the developmental skills can frequently be unrelated to the academic, behavioral, or functional learning expectations for other students of the
same grade level.
Parallel curricula
Special Education
Regular Education
Pull-out program
Inclusion Classroom
Standards-based IEPs
Change the focal point of the IEP team discussion
1. Identifying the standards that ALL students at a specific grade or age level should "know and be able to do."
2. Assessing where the student is functioning with regard to the grade-level standards.
3. Determining disability-related needs that prevent the student from being proficient in these standards.
4. Developing an Annual Goal to address these needs.
Preparing for the IEP meeting
Every member is integral.
Each member brings a "piece of the puzzle" to the discussion.
During the IEP Meeting
Step 1: Develop the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
Everyone who attends is prepared to discuss:
- grade level learning expectations for all students based upon the standards
- the impact of the student's disability on grade level learning expectations
- the student's strengths and disability related needs
Step 2: Develop measurable annual goals
Current IEP Practices
Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
Identify strengths related to the student's disability
Identify and prioritize areas of needs related to the student's disability
Discuss what all students should know and be able to do
Identify what the student needs to learn to achieve age/grade level expectations in standards, benchmarks, assessment frameworks
Identify parent concerns
Information from previous IEPs and assessment data
Current skills in relation to grade level benchmarks
Barriers to desired progress
Supports needed
Prioritize essential components necessary to meet grade level or age level standards
Realistic expectations on attainment
Grade or age level standards and grade level benchmarks and expectations
Also...
A students' IEP team must develop goals (and when appropriate objectives) that are designed to -
(aa) meet the child's needs that result from the child's disability to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum (§20 USC 1414).
For students enrolled in a functional skills curriculum, IEP teams need to analyze the grade level standard to identify the embedded access skills (Courtade and Browder 2011).
Quick Check
Is the information educationally valuable and written in a user-friendly fashion?
Does the baseline data represent the student's needs in relationship to the general education curriculum?
Would any teacher know where to begin instruction based on the information provided?
Standards based IEPs are not intended to define every educational goal for a student, and they are also not meant to eliminate any functional training students require (Bar-Lev and Van Haren, 2013).
Pick the most powerful standard that is going to help that student, says Sharen Bertrando.
The Council for Exceptional Children views the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and Response to Intervention (RtI) as providing special education students the opportunity to access the general education curriculum.
Teachers must have knowledge of the grade level Common Core State Standards and strategies that will help close the achievement gap.
Some thoughts...
Should the Common Core State Standards apply to students with IEPs?
All students are assessed on grade level content. Should we not, then, teach them on grade level?
What does it take to break down or teach to a standard?
For example: 11th grade student, 11th grade CCSS, but in the 7th grade context...
Stephen is currently in 11th grade and is receiving special education services in written expression. Although Stephen has a strong grasp of grammar and writing mechanics, he is not able to compose multi-paragraph argumentative compositions using more than two stimuli. He is unable to create a defensible claim, even with support and guidance from a teacher or a paraprofessional, scoring a 1 on a 4-point argumentative writing rubric. It can be difficult to follow the logic of his claim and evidence, as he is not able to properly order his arguments without the use of a teacher-supplied graphic organizer. His difficulty in creating a precise, knowledgeable claim negatively affects his ability successfully complete an argumentative essay.
Stephen is currently in 11th grade and is receiving special education services in written expression. Although Stephen has a strong grasp of grammar and writing mechanics, he is not able to compose multi-paragraph argumentative compositions
using more than two stimuli.
He is unable to create a defensible claim, even with support and guidance from a teacher or a paraprofessional,
scoring a 1 on a 4-point argumentative writing rubric
. It can be difficult to follow the logic of his claim and evidence, as he is not able
to properly order his arguments
without the use of a teacher-supplied graphic organizer. His difficulty in creating
a precise, knowledgeable claim
negatively affects his ability successfully complete
a clear and coherent
argumentative essay.
When connecting a student's IEP goals to the new CCSS for English/Language Arts and Mathematics, referencing the standard is sufficient to meet the federal requirement that the annual goals must enable the student to be involved and make progress in the general education curriculum (§300.320(a)(2)(i)(A).
The annual goal is not the standard!!!
Develop annual goals and measures of progress
Expectations in annual IEP cycle.
A Goal for each area of need.
Goals connected to grade or age level standards/benchmarks.
State level of attainment and measures of the progress.
IEP team members discuss the strengths of the student and prioritize his learning needs in relation to the academic standards for all students.
Conversation focuses on the grade level expectations and the students' current skill levels in each academic area.
IEP goals are related to the skills he needs to develop in order to make progress in each area.
Writing Standards: Grades 11-12 Students
Text Types and Arguments
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence:
a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
The annual goal defines the steps and skills needed to successfully reach the grade level or age level standard.
Stephen is currently in 11th grade and is receiving special education services in written expression. Although Stephen has a strong grasp of grammar and writing mechanics, he is not able to compose multi-paragraph argumentative compositions using more than two stimuli. He is unable to create a defensible claim, even with support and guidance from a teacher or a paraprofessional, scoring a 1 on a 4-point argumentative writing rubric. It can be difficult to follow the logic of his claim and evidence, as he is not able to properly order his arguments without the use of a teacher-supplied graphic organizer. His difficulty in creating a precise, knowledgeable claim negatively affects his ability successfully complete an argumentative essay.
Text Types and Arguments
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence:
a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
1. When presented with an argumentative prompt or performance task, Stephen will create a precise, knowledgeable claim and provide at least one piece of evidence to support his claim, earning a 2 on a 4 point argumentative essay rubric.
1. Stephen will independently choose and complete a graphic organizer appropriate to an argumentative essay when given a performance task or argumentative essay prompt, earning a 2 on a 4 point argumentative essay rubric.
In order for students with disabilities to meet high academic standards and to fully demonstrate their conceptual and procedural knowledge and skills in mathematics, reading, writing, speaking and listening (English language arts), their instruction must incorporate supports and accommodations, including:
- supports and related services designed to meet the unique needs of these students and to enable their access to the general education curriculum (IDEA 34 CFR §300.34, 2004).
- an Individualized Education Program which includes annual goals aligned with and chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade-level academic standards.
- teachers and specialized instructional support personnel who are prepared and qualified to deliver high quality, evidence-based, individualized instruction and support services.
Universal Design for Learning
a scientifically valid framework for guiding educational practice that (a) provides flexibility in the ways information is presented, in the ways students respond or demonstrate knowledge and skills, and in the ways students are engaged; and (b) reduces barriers in instruction, provides appropriate accommodations, supports, and challenges, and maintains high achievement expectations for all students, including students with disabilities and students who are limited English proficient.
Higher Education Opportunity Act (PL 110-135)
Principle 1: Multiple means of Representation
Principle 2: Multiple means of Action and Expression
Principle 3: Multiple means of Engagement
Instructional activities MUST have a purpose related to the CCSS.
Knowledge of academic language differentiates successful students
- Lilly Wong Fillmore
Complexity of thinking.
Not "levels" of thinking, like Bloom's taxonomy

Close Reading
Sentence Frames
Rubrics
Adapted Literature
Become familiar with Common Core Standards and district level benchmarks
Stay student-focused
Don't force a connection between all IEP goals and standards.
Outcomes in other school districts
Students are achieving at higher levels.
General education teachers can see the link between what they do and the needs of students with disabilities.
Standards provide a common language among all educators.
There are higher expectations for students with disabilities.
Parents are enthusiastic that IEP goals' language is more recognizable and less clinical.
April , 2014
Bar-Lev, N. & Van Haren, B.
Connecting Common Core Standards and IEPs: Toto, We're Not in Kansas Anymore!
(Powerpoint Slides). Retrieved from https://www.uwosh.edu/coehs/conferences-and-symposiums/seeds-of-inclusion/documents/2013-documents/van-haren-session-connecting-common-core-standards.pdf
Saxton, E.
Common Core and Special Education: Lessons Learned
(Powerpoint Slides). Retrieved from http://www.isbe.net/spec-ed/conf/2013/pdf/session16.pdf
TN Department of Education.
Writing Instructionally Appropriate IEPs Tied to Common Core State Standards
(Powerpoint Slides). From www.state.tn.us/education/speced/doc/writingiepcommoncore.pptx‎
Courtade, G. & Browder, D. (2011).
Aligning IEPs to the Common Core State Standards for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities.
Verona, WI: Attainment Company, Inc.
Reap, T. (2010).
Individual Education Program, New York, Version 8 Goals and Objectives
. Rockville Centre, NY.
Illinois State Board of Education. (2013).
April 2013 Guidance Document: Documenting Common Core State Standards on the Individualized Education Program.
North Dakota Department of Public Instruction. (2013).
Transition to the North Dakota Standards in English and Mathematics based on the Common Core State Standards: Tips and considerations for Writing Standards-based IEP goals.
Bismark, ND.
Swanson, K. (2014). Five Strategies to Infuse Common Core State Standards with Social Studies Instruction. Herff Jones Nystrom. Retrieved from https://www.herffjonesnystrom.com/index.cfm?fa=Teachers.12March
Five close reading strategies to support the Common Core. (June, 2012). Retrieved from http://iteachicoachiblog.blogspot.com/2012/06/five-simple-close-reading-strategies.html
Demonstrate independence
Build strong content knowledge
Respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline
Comprehend as well as critique
Value evidence
Use technology and digital media strategically and capably
Come to understand other perspectives and cultures
Customizing display of information
Offering alternative to auditory information
Offering alternative to visual information
Clarifying vocabulary and symbols
Supplying background knowledge
Maximizing transfer and generalization
Providing options of physical action
Varying the methods for response
Optimizing access to tools and assistive technologies
Using multiple media for communication
Using multiple tools for construction and composition
Optimizing individual choice and autonomy
Minimizing threats and distractions
Varying demands and resources to optimize challenge
Developing self assessment and reflection
Rigor!
Questioning Strategies
Think-Pair-Share
Numbered Heads
Wait Time
Struggle and frustration can be good instructional tools
Don't worry!
Allow students to have processing time!
when in moderation!
What is the author saying?
Dig deeper into the text.
Keyboarding Skills
Students with significant cognitive disabilities assessed on an alternative assessment will continue to need short term objectives.
The IEP team will make that determination, although RtI Tier 1 strategies and interventions will replace a majority of short term objectives.
In most cases, measurable annual goals with progress monitoring will replace short term objectives.
Benefits of an Instructionally Appropriate IEP
- Ties the IEP to the general education curriculum
- Provides positive directions and goals for the intervention
- Utilizes standards to identify specific content critical to a student's successful progress in the general education curriculum
- Promotes a single educational system that is inclusive through common language and curriculum for special and general education students
- Ensures greater consistency across schools and districts
- Encourages higher expectations for students with disabilities
Sydney:
Freshman
Special Education Services in English/Language Arts

Sydney struggles with reading comprehension. Specifically, she is not able to determine the theme of a text. As a result, she is unable to provide an objective summary of the text. When writing an argumentative essay, this can prove problematic since she is unable to determine whether a stimuli supports or opposes the proposed viewpoint.

Markus:
Junior
Special Education Services in Mathematics

Markus has difficulty with the computation of multi-digit numbers (multiplication and division). Because he cannot regularly multiply or divide two and three digit numbers, he is unable to correctly factor polynomial equations.
Algebra Standards for High School
Seeing Structure in Expressions

3. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.
a. Factor a quadratic expression to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.
Reading Standards for Literature 6-12
Key Ideas and Details

2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and it shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Denyse
Senior
Special Education Services in Mathematics and E/LA

Denyse has difficulty completing her homework. She is currently failing 4 out of her 6 classes due to low test scores. While her attendance is not an issue (one absence), she has difficulty taking tests. Even when provided an alternate setting, she struggles to answer every question in the time allotted. Denyse is able to read grade level texts, but is unable to determine an author's point of view or his or her purpose in the text. Her teacher discovered that she does not have any background knowledge of rhetoric, its devices, or its effects on the text. In math, Denyse struggles with creating one variable equations to solve problems, although she has no computational deficits. Creating two equations with two or more variables to show the relationship between numbers is similarly difficult for her.
Consider the needs of the broadest possible range of users
from the beginning
.
- Architect Ray Mace
From the beginning of the lesson planning process, develop lessons and activities that support the learning needs of all students!
Full transcript