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Text Dependent Questions

Staff Development: Spencer-Van Etten, January 2015
by

Nicole DeLaney

on 11 March 2015

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Transcript of Text Dependent Questions

Nicole DeLaney
Spencer-Van Etten Central School
January 2015


Text Dependent Questions

Common Core Vocabulary
Common Tier 2 Vocabulary Words Found in Common Core Materials and Assessments
General academic words that apply to all domains and content areas. A list of these words can be found in the handout.
Tier 2 words should be explicitly taught & should be included in Common Core sample questions.
Ways for Students to Acquire Words They Do Not Know
Students must be flexible in the ways they determine the meaning of unknown words. (references, context clues, use Geek and Latin roots, check the inferred meaning with a reference source).
Understand the difference between words using figurative language and word relationships (using relationships between words to better understand the words, associations and associations of words with similar definitions).
Text Based Questions, Text Independent Questions, & Text Dependent Questions
Text Based Questions: basic recall questions that can be found directly in the text.
Text Independent Questions: Require students to bring in their own background knowledge but do not require students to actually read the text.
Text Dependent Questions: Require students to read the entire text. Answering a Text Dependent Question requires a student to take information from the text and synthesize and analyze it to develop a response that reflects higher level thinking.
What is Close Reading?
(Dr. Douglas Fisher)
an encounter with the text where students really focus on what the author had to say, what the author’s purpose was, what the words mean, and what the structure of the text tells us.
requires students to bring in what the author has to say and our own information to gain a deeper understanding of the text. In a close reading,
Students reread the text. Teachers give students text dependent questions and students go back and search for the answers. Close reading requires that students think and understand what they are reading.
Why Close Reading?
Students are now being asked to read texts closely, analyze texts, and synthesize what they read to develop new ideas about their reading.
Close Reading is a strategy that will help our students succeed, develop higher level thinking skills, and be successful rather than frustrated as the rigor rises in our instruction.
Research Base: Engage New York, the International Reading Association, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, and Diane Lapp.
How to Use the
Close Reading Strategy
Number the Paragraphs: The Common Core Standards asks students to be able to site and refer to the text. Numbering the paragraphs gives students a reference point for discussing and writing about what they read.
Chunk the Text: Breaking the text into small sections makes it more manageable for students. Have students draw a horizontal line between sections (you decide first, then scaffold students to independence).
How to Use the Close Reading Strategy (Continued)
Underline and Circle With a Purpose. Students underline key ideas based on very specific information. This could be a text dependent question or a purpose you set for the children reflecting what you would like them to get out of the text. Students circle key terms that are defined and repeated throughout the text.
Left Margin Notes: What is the author saying?: In the left margin students summarize each chunk. It may be helpful to teach summarizing lessons prior to asking students to summarize the chunk.
How to Use the Close Reading Strategy (Continued)
Right Margin Notes: Digging Deeper into the Text: Teachers often need to provide students with a specific purpose for right margin notes. Teachers may direct student attention to author’s purpose or a text based question. Think, “What do I want my students to get out of this reading?” Throughout the year you can scaffold students to independence. You may have the students create the following types of notes in the right margin: using a power verb to describe what the author is doing (arguing, describing, comparing) and then ask students to be specific about how the author was doing this, representing the information with a picture, or asking questions. There are countless ways students can dig deeper into the text; these are just a few examples.
Which words should be used? (Words that should be included are those that are connected to key understanding of the text.) manufactured, adhesive, product

Identify the word you would like to use to structure your question around. Adhesive

What type of question would you like to ask? (You can ask students to define a word or use context clues to define the word. Each type of question should ask students to apply the definition of the word to their understanding of the text.) define using context clues

Create your question (s).
Adhesive was important to the invention of Post-it notes.
As used in the quote below, adhesive most closely means
“Silver developed a new adhesive, but it was weaker than what 3M already manufactured It stuck to objects but it could easily be lifted off. It was super weak instead of super strong. “
a. Paper
b. Tape
c. Paste
d. bookmark

Which words should be used? (Words that should be included are those that are connected to key understanding of the text.)

Identify the word you would like to use to structure your question around.
What type of question would you like to ask? (You can ask students to define a word or use context clues to define the word. Each type of question should ask students to apply the definition of the word to their understanding of the text.)

Create your question (s).

Begin identifying the key insights you want students to understand from the text. Record these ideas.
*Post-it notes were invented by mistake and two individuals were essential to the invention. But they are now a useful product.

Identify the major points for understanding the text.
“Post it notes were not a planned product. No one got the idea and then stayed up all night to invent it.” –paragraph 3, “Today they are one of the most popular office products available.” “No one knew what to do wit the stuff (adhesive), but Silver didn’t discard it. (Paragraph 5) “Remembering Silver’s adhesive , Fry used some to coat his markers.”

Create your question(s).
According to the text, Post-it notes were created by mistake and are a popular office product today. Two key inventors, Spencer Silver and Arthur Fry, were responsible for the creation of Post-it Notes. Would it have been possible for Post-it notes to the successful product they are without one of these inventor’s contributions or were both inventors essential to the success of Post-it notes? What contributions were important for the creation of Post-it notes? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

Begin identifying the key insights you want students to understand from the text. Record these ideas.

Identify the major points for understanding the text.

Create your question(s).
Text Dependent Questions
Require students to read the entire text. Answering a Text Dependent Question requires a student to take information from the text and synthesize and analyze it to develop a response that reflects higher level thinking.

A text dependent question specifically asks a question that can only be answered by referring explicitly back to the text being read.

Text Dependent Questions do not rely on any particular background information extraneous to the text nor depend on students having other experiences or knowledge.

Can be literal (checking for understanding) but must also involve analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.

Focus on word, sentence, and paragraph, as well as larger ideas, themes, or events.

Focus on difficult protons of text in order to enhance reading proficiency.
Creating Core Understanding and Key Idea Text Dependent Questions
Creating Vocabulary Based Text Dependent Questions
References
A Guide for Creating Text Dependent Questions for Close Analytical Reading

Dr. Catherine Thome, Bringing the Common Core Standards to Life in the Classroom

Rhode Island Department of Education: Creating Text Dependent Questions for Close Reading

D. Fisher & N. Frey, Engaging the Adolescent Learner: Text Dependent Questions (International Reading Association)

Close Reading and Text Dependent Questions: Fall River Public Schools

D. Fisher, N. Frey, D. Lapp, Text Complexity: Raising Rigor in Reading

D. Fisther, & N. Frey Text-Dependent Questions Effective questions about literature and nonfiction texts require students to delve into a text to find answers. (Instructional Leadership)

Teachers’ College Reading and Writing Project Materials
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