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Romanticism

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by

Barbara Milhizer

on 22 October 2014

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Transcript of Romanticism

American Romanticism 1800-1855
Historical Context
American Identity
Celebration of the Individual
A New Nation
Westward expansion
"Manifest destiny"
Louisiana Purchase
Illusion of boundlessness
Industrial Revolution
Agrarian to industrial economy
Rural to urban
Reaction to commercialism
Return to simplicity, nature, beauty - Utopian movements
Social Reform
Anti-slavery
Human rights
Workers
Women
Political Ideas
Nationalism vs. Regionalism
2 party system
Majority rule
Religion
Second Great Awakening 1795-1840s
Move away from centrally organized religion
Belief in free will
Social
Growth of clubs, organizations, guilds
Education: Public high schools, increase in literacy
Women's Lib
Abolitionism
Cultural
Growth in the arts
Literature
Novels
Poetry
Short stories
Magazines
Dance
Music
Art
Cult of the Individual
Individual perspective
Supernatural and psychological events
Heroic individuals in conflict with society
The "Noble Savage"
Back to Nature
Nature = Good
Society = Bad
Mysterious, exotic settings
Power/awe of nature
Sympathy to natural beings (children, animals)
Heart not Head
Reaction to the Age of Reason
Valued passion, imagination, and creativity over logic
Transcendentalism 1830-1840
Humans are divine
Self-trust and self-reliance
Voice of God in each person
Nature is divine and the reflection of the human spirit
Seek universal truth through transcendence
Discovered in nature
Transcend the physical senses
All beings united in the Oversoul
Transcendentalists
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Henry David Thoreau
Gothic Romanticism
Emphasis on emotion- but darker side
Human capacity for evil
Grotesque, bizarre, violent
Poe, Hawthorne, Melville
Fireside Poets
Morally uplifting
Optimistic
Engaging
Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes, Whittier
Full transcript