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SY200 Israel-Palestine Conflict part 1

Year 12 Social Studies
by

Vanessa Cameron

on 28 February 2016

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Transcript of SY200 Israel-Palestine Conflict part 1

1904
Balfour Declaration
1896
Der Judenstaat published
"We have sincerely tried everywhere to merge with the national communities in which we live, seeking only to preserve the faith of our fathers. It is not permitted us. In our native lands where we have lived for centuries we are still decried as aliens, often by men whose ancestors had not yet come at a time when Jewish sighs had long been heard in the country..."
"Palestine is our unforgettable historic homeland..."
"Let me repeat once more my opening words: The Jews who will it shall achieve their State. We shall live at last as free men on our own soil, and in our own homes peacefully die. The world will be liberated by our freedom, enriched by our wealth, magnified by our greatness."
1917
Weizmann and Balfour meet
1914
WWI starts
WWI ends
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20415675
c.2000BC
c.1250BC
c.600BC
c. 66BC
640AD
1095AD
1517AD
1918AD
The History of Israel-Palestine
The first 4000 years
Key Understandings
The history of the Israel-Palestine area is very long
It is very important place to Jews, Christians and Muslims
There have been long periods of peace in this region
Israel is in the Middle East
Africa
Russia
Spain
England
Middle East
21.
Islam
Islam is the main religion of the Middle East. Sunni and Shiite are two different types of Islam. The Orthodox religions are Christian.
Geographic area of the Middle East
Key features of the Middle East
Map 2: Map of Israel and surrounding areas
Label your map of the Middle East using the atlas
Label your map of Israel with these places: Israel, West Bank, Gaza, Jerusalem, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Syria, Tel Aviv, River Jordan (write along the border/river), Saudi Arabia
Colour in the entire countries or their boundaries (different colours)
Give your map a title
Analysis
Population
Decide on two examples for each category
population
religion: Sunni, Sh'ite, Jewish
conflict
Warm: make 5 generalisations making sure you have 1 for each area: population, religion and conflict.
Week Five-Six
Week Three
Israel-Palestine Conflict: Part One
This course involves the concepts 'conflict' and 'rights'
Welcome to Sociology
Conflict
Rights
Often conflicts emerge out of a conflict over rights
Exercise your rights?
Meet your responsibilities?
What examples of rights do you know of?
Watch this clip which briefly shows the 30 rights listed in the UDHR.
Right
We are all born free and equal
Who is responsible for upholding this right and how?
In NZ some people are born with a lot, and some people with very little. Some children grow up in places with less stuff, and more problems. Also, we all have different abilities and some people are disabled and can't do some things.
The government provides free hospital care
As WEGC students we treat everyone equally
As NZ citizens, if we know of people who are enslaved we inform the police
School's meet their responsibility to provide programmes to aid students of all abilities
No discrimination
We have the right to life
No slavery
No torture

You MUST do this step silently and secretly. Each person must now rank the five rights from most to least important. This is a personal decision.
Finally, you need to imagine that you are the NZ government. Times are tough. It's expensive protecting everyone's rights. One right will have to be cut. In ten minutes you will be explaining which right is being cut and why to the whole class
TASK: complete one or more of the following, challenge yourself!
WARM:
Describe what people/ countries do to demonstrate their rights. Give several examples.
HOT:
Does upholding human rights always result in conflict? Explain your answer using examples.
SCORCHING:
'Some human rights are more important than others'.To what extent do you agree with this statement? Give reasons to justify your answer.
L.O's:
All
will be able to describe how people exercise their 'rights'
Most
will explain how people meet their responsibilities to uphold rights
Some
will evaluate how rights are exercised and responsibilities upheld in NZ
1. You have the right to own things and nobody has the right to take these from you without a good reason
2. You have the right to think what you want, to say what you like, and nobody should forbid you from doing so
3. You have the right to belong to a country and nobody can prevent you, without a good reason, from belonging to a country if you wish
4. You have the right to go to school and everyone should go to school
5. You should be considered innocent until it can be proven that you are guilty
Next you will form groups based on which right you put as your most important. You should NOT be in a group with someone who agrees with you.
Key Understandings: to understand the key geographical and cultural features of the Middle East
All
will be able to provide some key features of the Middle East
Most
will be able to explain the effects population, religion and conflict have on relationships in the Middle East
Some
will analyse features of the Middle East to determine whether harmony can be achieved in the region.
Conflict in the Middle East
Israel & Palestine
AS91283
AS91279
Promises
The relationship between exercising rights and meeting responsibilities
STARTER: Question the picture
What's happening here?
Is anyone to blame?
What human rights are involved?
BEYOND:
Different ideas or beliefs about rights result in conflict. How can conflict be addressed effectively? (consider what you did to get to a final decision, and whether this was effective or not) and whose responsibility is it to resolve conflict?
Homework:
Find an example in the news of where a right is being broken or upheld. In a paragraph:
explain how your event/ issue relates to a human right
how the right is being or could be exercised
whose responsibility it is to uphold the right and why
What do you know about the Middle East?
Large
Medium
Small
Hot: make 3 generalisations- 1 for each area: population, religion and conflict
AND
Explain an effect of each generalisation on the interaction (or relationships) between countries in the Middle East
Scorching: 'Differences in population, religion and conflict mean that harmony will never be achieved in the Middle East'. To what extent do you agree with this statement? Use evidence from each area to support your answer.
Map 1: Map of the Middle East
Use the world map or map of the Middle East in the Atlas to work out which country goes with each number, also writing the name of the country on the map.
Instructions: complete 1 or more of the tasks below
Yarko
Sanabel
Daniel
Faraj
Moishe
STARTER: for each character, write:
whether they are an Israeli or a Palestinian
Whether they are Muslim, a secular Jew or an orthodox Jew
Shlomo
Week Four-Five
Mahmoud
Let's see how they've changed...
Promises was filmed between 1995-2001. Follow-up interviews were done in 2004
Starter:
Yarko
Sanabel
Daniel
Faraj
Moishe
Shlomo
Mahmoud
Promises: Character profiles
Yarko
Sanabel
TASK: complete the 'Promises: character profiles' worksheet using the 'Promises: quotes' information sheet
Daniel
Faraj
Moishe
Shlomo
Mahmoud
Which side is in the wrong?
Who you do sympathise with?
Israeli/ Jewish
Palestinian/ Muslim
STARTER: why is Jerusalem important in this conflict? Use specific information from the sources below to provide an answer.
They are developed in the first few years of life as our brains are interpreting the experiences we have with people who are close to us. These people help us shape our world. This is our values forming. Values can change as we are exposed to new environments and ideas.

1. What are two of your values and where did they come from?

2. Sometimes we focus on particular values over others in a certain situation.
a) E.G Immigration of different cultures into NZ. Are you for it or against it? Why? What values are influencing your decision.
b) Looking after your parents in their retirement. Are you for it or against it? Why? What values are influencing your decision.


How do we get our values?
Ok- so the Chimp was a joke. But perhaps if Chimps could talk he probably wouldn’t pick the scientist because of animal testing??!!

Individuals and societies have different values. We can’t assume that our own values are natural or normal.
The moral of the story…
What about other people and societies?
It seems we value:
Youth (did anyone choose the 60 year old man?)
Health and well-being
Culture
Family
Care for others
Justice
Generalisations
Looking at the most popular people whom were chosen to be saved we can make some generalisations about our common values.
Common Values
Values can also be shared by people of the same society, culture, community or family.
Groups within a society can also have different values and this can cause conflict.
Were there any similarities and differences between the groups?
The reason: VALUES!

Values are the qualities and principles considered to have merit or importance.

Individuals hold personal values and you were asked to make value judgements about who to save..
Why did we not agree on everything?
ACTIVITY:
As we go through the following images decide who each person probably would have saved or not wanted to save.

Think about what they value (put yourself in their shoes).
You must now consult with others and come to a group consensus as to who will be saved by the medical team.
Group task
1. Describe at least 4 of your values, explaining what has formed these values.
2. What experiences have or might cause these values to shift?
Homework task
Scenario:
You are the head doctor in a small hospital. A plane has crashed and 10 people are critically injured and will all die in the next 30 minutes if they do not receive medical help.

TASK:
You only have the resources to help 5. Who will you save?
Look at the list on the following slide and write down your individual 5 choices (do not consult with others yet).
STARTER:
THE CRASH
Who did you choose? And why?
Was it easy to come to a consensus?

Was there debate and some arguing involved?

We see it all the time in society- debate about different issues. Can you think of any “hot topics” at the moment?
The Group Dynamics
A world famous fashion designer
A 60 year old man
A pregnant 17 year old
A 13 year old boy
His 5 year old sister
Choose 5 to save…
Key understanding:
To be able to identify the values that create our viewpoints
L.O's:
All
will be able to identify some of their values
Most
will be able to explain the values that contribute to peoples' points of view
Some
will be able to analyse our values in different situations
TASK:
in pairs, complete the perspectives worksheet
Homework:
complete the perspectives worksheet
This is a written task to be handed in on refill by:
Week One
Week Two

A scientist on the verge of a cure for AIDS
A religious leader
A 18 year old Downs Syndrome boy
A mother of 6 children
A murderer en route to donate a kidney
STARTER:
V
A
L
U
E
S
Instructions:
come up with a word related to our last lesson that starts with each of the letters (
What does the word 'religion' mean to you?

STARTER:
Discuss with the people at your table:
Religion as a social force
L.O's:
All

will be able to state key points about Catholicism
Most

will be able to explain how leadership is important in religion
Some
will be able to analyse the Pope's view on contraception
Organised
Religions
Christianity
Catholic
Group activities: copy and complete the brainstorm below showing what organised religions you know of
Organised Religion
Q: do you know any key beliefs of these religions?
Key beliefs and their effects on individuals/ groups
Religion
Key belief
Effect of belief on individuals/ groups
Catholicism
Degree of personal choice e.g contraception not allowed to be used
Population control issues
Disease prevention issues
Women's rights
Let's look at the global context of key beliefs and the influence of leadership...
Global context and leadership influences
WARM:
Provide 4 statements on Catholics and rates of HIV/AIDS

E.G The largest number of Catholics live...
HOT:
Explain why the Pope's view on contraception shows the importance of leadership.
SCORCHING:
'Pope Francis supports the use of contraception'
To what extent do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer giving reasons.


TASK: use both information sheets to complete 1 or more of the tasks below (challenge yourself!)
Social Forces
Religion
Media
Law
A social force is anything within a society that has the capability to bring about change
We will focus on a the below social forces in Sociology, beginning with religion
PLENARY:
copy and complete the triangle below,
Media as a Social Force
L.O's:
All
will be able to identify several forms of media
Most
will be able to describe how NZ has been affected my music
Some
will be able to examine how different forms of media act as social forces
STARTER:
Discuss with the people at your table:
How religion as a social force influences the control of HIV
Task 1: How many forms of media can you identify below? List them.
Media
Media is the means of communication, that reach or influence people widely
The influence of the media
Music
Influence on language/ culture
Accents
American music dominates in NZ
NZ artists influenced by American music
NZ artists sing with American accent
Who's singing with a NZ accent?
On the next slide, let's see if you can pick up accents in the following artists...
TASK 1: whilst listening to the following clips, see if you can pick up which artist(s) sing with a NZ accent
TASK 1: use the information sheet and your own knowledge to complete 1 or more of the following
WARM:
Describe how American music is a social force in NZ

HOT:
Compare two forms of media as social forces. Which one is more powerful? Give reasons to support your answer.
Stem sentence:
Social Media is more powerful as a social force than newspapers because...
Stem sentence:
E.G Music as a social force has affected NZ because...
INTRO LESSON
STARTER:
What can we learn from the poster?
Law as a social force
L.O's:
All
will describe how law can change over time
Most
will describe influences of the law
Some
will describe the social forces which influence law
Plenary:
True or False
Decide whether the following statements are True or false
1. NZ music artists mostly sing in an American accent
2. Radio and sports are forms of media
3. Media is a social force as it can influence large groups of people
4. China is trying to get into the global music scene more as they see the power music has as a social force
Social and political groups for homosexuals in New Zealand began in the 1960s. By the next decade, sexual and social liberation was in the air. The early 1970s saw the growth of the modern feminist and gay movements.

New Zealanders took their cues from events in the USA. The Gay Liberation Front emerged to demand change in laws and in society.

In early 1972 Gay Liberation groups sprang up after the academic Ngahuia Te Awekotuku was denied a visitors permit to the USA on the grounds that she was homosexual. Other groups formed throughout New Zealand in the next few years.

Birth of the gay movement - homosexual law reform
Wellington Central MP Fran Wilde’s bill, which aroused bitter public and political debate, removed criminal sanctions against consensual male homosexual practices.

The Homosexual Law Reform Bill was signed on 11 July 1986. It decriminalised sexual relations between men aged 16 and over (previously were liable to prosecution and imprisonment). Though sex between women had never been illegal, many lesbians suffered the same social discrimination as gay men and were staunch supporters of the reform movement.

The campaign to reform the law moved beyond the gay community to embrace wider issues of human rights and discrimination. Opponents of the law reform warned that it would destroy the ‘New Zealand family’ and predicted the spread of AIDS through the community.

1986 Homosexual Law Reform Bill passed
What do you think were the consequences of this bill being passed?
Ellen coming out in the 1990's
TASK: after watching the clip...
a. Explain Ellen's perspective on being gay. Include a worldview if applicable. Relate a concept to her perspective.
b. Explain her father/ step-mother's opinion on Ellen being gay, apply a worldview if applicable. Relate a concept to his/ her perspective.
NZ legalises gay marriage
Law as a social force
TASK:
Explain how law acts as a social force. Make sure you include the homosexual law changes in 1986 and 2013 as examples.

Law has been a social force in NZ for gay rights because...
Task 2: the government makes sure we're exposed to media from NZ e.g NZ on Air, Maori TV, NZ Music Month. What is the point of this? Does this influence us? (what do you think when you hear NZ music?)
How do people exercise this right?
TASK: in your groups, discuss if the following rights are upheld in NZ? (is this true in NZ?)
Reality check: is this right upheld in NZ
We are all born free and equal
No discrimination
We have the right to life
No slavery
No torture
Exercising rights and meeting responsibilities
Applying for any job we choose
Demanding pay equality
Taking people to court should they violate this right
Using the media to publicise the abuse of this right
TASK:
Glue in the list of rights in the UDHR
Exercising a right means to demonstrate it e.g...
(give an example in school)
Meeting your responsibilities means to meet any responsibilities you have to uphold a right e.g...
(give an example from home or school of a right you have a responsibility to uphold)
Exercising rights and meeting responsibilities
What does it mean to:
Q: are there situations in school that you don't exercise a right or meet a responsibility?
TASK: in groups, complete the worksheet
TASK: discuss, in your groups what these rights mean
STARTER:
A United Nations report has identified that NZ has to work on our human rights, specifically:

domestic violence
child poverty
racism
Do you think this is true? (is this a real issue in NZ?)
What do you think needs to be done?
Whose responsibility is it to improve these rights?
Q: what does the NZ government do to meet their responsibility to protect this right?
Individual task
TASK 3: complete the diagram three times
religion
population (draw a bar graph showing population with 1million = 1mm)
TASK 4: go back to your Middle East map and add following
What's a generalisation?
Something that is generally true.
E.G "Many people in New Zealand like rugby."
This is generally true.
"Everyone in New Zealand likes rugby"
This is not true. This is an over-generalisation. The key to a generalisation is using words like
most
and
many
instead of
all
and
everyone
.
PLENARY:
Discuss in your groups what you think is the greatest contributor to conflict in the Middle East
Population
Religion
Past conflict
Christianity
The Bible
Islam
Muslims
The Koran/ Qoran, Qur'an
Judaism
Jewish
The Torah
Christians
STARTER: match up the below religions with their followers and their holy books
1. Across 2 pages of your book, have two headings: 'Islam' and on the other page 'Judaism'

2. using the COWS/computers, you are to research the following to add to your info above:
At least five key facts about each religion (must include at least 3 beliefs/ teachings)
Draw/ print off at least 3 pictures related to each religion (Holy places/ people/ items etc)
Religions: research on Islam and Judaism
Why is Jerusalem important?
TASK: whilst watching the clip, look for reasons for why Jerusalem holds importance
Type in this: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10878135
What countries are at each location? Match the numbers and letters
1.
2.
2.
3.
4.
a. Palestine
b. Jordan
c. Israel
d. Egypt
STARTER:
Write down the country at each number (for 4a & 4b, give the country and name of the area)

STARTER: why is Jerusalem important in this conflict? Use specific information from the picture in your answer?
First lesson of watching the documentary
Difference between secular, traditional & orthodox Jews
Using the information sheet, complete one of the tasks below
WARM:
complete the mindmap below, making sure you have at least 3 points off each category below
HOT:
copy and complete the venn diagram below
Differences between secular, traditional and Orthodox Jews
Secular Jews
Traditional Jews
Orthodox Jews
Shabbat
Secular Jews
Orthodox Jews
Similarities
Differences
Second lesson of watching the documentary
HOMEWORK:
Complete the 'Background to conflict in the Middle East' crossword
Task:

1. Using the timeline, list the key events in the change in rights for NZ gay people.
2. What forces caused the law changes? Any ideas about was happening in NZ/ the World at the time of each of these changes
1. Give an example of a character that is a secular Jew.
2. Give an example of a character that is an Orthodox Jew.
3. What's the difference between a Palestinian and an Arab?
4. What's the difference between a secular and orthodox Jew?
Yarko
Sanabel
Daniel
Faraj
Moishe
Shlomo
Mahmoud
Promises: Opinions on ownership of Israel/ Jerusalem
Promises: opinions on ownership of Israel/ Jerusalem
L.O's:
All
will be able to describe a viewpoint on the ownership of Israel
Most
will be able to explain (giving reasons/ evidence) a viewpoint on the ownership of Israel
Some
will be able to analyse why there are different viewpoints on the ownership of Israel.
Third lesson of watching the documentary
Promises: Opinions on ownership of Israel/ Jerusalem
TASK: complete the 2nd and 3rd column of the worksheet below using 'Promises: quotes' to help you. We'll do the 4th column after we've watched the follow up part of the documentary.
(as a word and its meaning to you e.g how does it relate to you?)
The History of Gay Rights in NZ
or
Google 'Timeline: Gay Rights in NZ' and click on the first link.
Type in this: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10878135
1. Using the timeline, list the key events in the change in rights for NZ gay people.
2. Think, pair, share: what else was happening in NZ at the time of each of these changes? Put these ideas down between events on your list.
3. Think, pair, share: what forces caused the law changes?
The History of Gay Rights in NZ
or
Google 'Timeline: Gay Rights in NZ' and click on the first link.
OR
STARTER
Perspectives and concepts
L.O's:
All
will be able to describe a perspective on an issue
Most
will be able to explain a perspective providing the values which have caused that viewpoint.
Some

will compare and contrast different perspectives

Perspectives writing frame
1. ...thinks...
2. They think this because...
When writing perspectives you want to clearly structure your writing
3. "..." (Provide a quote that illustrates your point)
T
E
X
What is your perspective on the use of contraception to prevent the spread of disease such as HIV/ AIDS? Follow the structure below when writing your answer.
Perspectives can be categorised or fit into a wider perspective or worldview. This can be shown when explaining a viewpoint ('E') Example:

Perspectives writing frame
The Catholic Church thinks that contraception should not be used.
They think this because they believe women are meant to have babies and so shouldn't do anything that would stop this happening.
They are coming from a Religious perspective/ worldview as it is Catholic teachings that are affecting this view that contraception is not acceptable.
"Bergoglio [Pope Francis] is seen as unwaveringly orthodox on matters of sexual morality, staunchly opposing abortion, same-sex marriage, and contraception"
T
E
X
What is the view of the Catholic Church on the use of contraception?
I think...
I think this because...
T: Topic sentence
E: Explanation
Worldviews
Religious: affected by the values/ doctrine of a religion e.g Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Islamic.

Atheist: belief that there is no God—or gods.

Gender: female or male, usually female and concerned with feminism/ stopping sexism

Multicultural: appreciating the positives of a range of cultures/ diversity

Bicultural: being concerned with the interests of the two main cultures over others e.g Maori and Pakeha being acknowledged as the two founding cultures of NZ

Humanitarian: concerned with humans or what is best for people (their rights/ safety/ well-being)

Conservative: value traditions, seek to preserve things as they are (status quo) emphasizing stability and continuity

Liberal: ideas of liberty and equality are central, open to change. Support democracy, civil rights, freedom of press/ religion etc.

Capitalist: focussed on making money, business growth, growing the economy, free markets (no government intervention)

Socialist: ideas that focus on making all people equal and that disadvantaged people should have what they need e.g benefits, state housing, free education

Nationalist: ideas that focus on or show loyalty to what's best for the country or nation e.g patriotism
CONCEPTS
A concept is an idea that relates to a topic/ issue.

Anything can be a concept but in Social Studies there are some that we look at in particular (list of concepts sheet)
The Social Studies concept of beliefs or values relates to my view of contraception to stop HIV because I believe/ value...
Sentence structure when writing concepts
Consider your view of the use of contraception to stop the spread of HIV/ AIDS.
Not a worldview so add to glossary:
Agnostic: a person who believes that nothing is known or can be known of the existence or nature of God.
My perspective on contraception to prevent HIV/AIDS shows a humanitarian worldview because I am concerned with..
Q: Does your answer to the starter question show a worldview?
E.G The concept of rights relates to my view because I think it is a women's right to decide if she uses contraception or not.
TASK: try applying the concept of 'beliefs' or 'values' to your view:
STARTER:
Complete the perspectives and worldviews worksheet
Worldviews: religious, conservative, liberal, atheist, humanitarian, gender, socialist, capitalist, multi-cultural, bicultural and nationalist
TASK 1:
whilst watching the film you need to explain two perspectives

E.G Schmuel
thinks/ believe
s that it is wrong what is happening to the people in the concentration camps
because
they are being held against his will and tortured. He
values
freedom, equality and safety. He is showing a
humanitarian worldview
.

Task 2:
apply 2 concepts to the film or actions of people in the film. If applicable, apply a worldview.

Concepts: rights, identity, values, beliefs, prejudice, family, interaction, change, cultural interaction, culture, human rights, government

E.G The Social Studies concept of
values
relates to Bruno’s mother’s reaction to the concentration camp
because
she is horrified by what is happening there. She is showing a humanitarian world view as she
values
human life and that people be treated with respect.

Boy in the Striped Pyjamas: Applying perspectives and concepts
(Think 5 W's and an H)
Which areas are Palestine?
This is at the centre of the conflict. The areas of Gaza and the West Bank are Palestine.
TASK: Indicate this on your map.

Question 1. Look at the geographical position of Israel and Palestine. Why would this cause problems?

The people in Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Syria and Saudi Arabia are all Arabs. Just like the people in African countries are African.

The people in Israel are different. They are Jewish in ethnicity.

Question 2. How would the countries surrounding Israel/ Palestine being Arab create conflict?
Other factors: Religion
1. What are the dominant religions in the Middle East?
2. Label the religions on your map
1. What are the dominant religions in the Middle East?
2. Label the religions on your map
FORMATIVE
STARTER:
Consider Palestinians who live in the refugee camps and discuss the following in your groups:
1. What rights are not being met in the refugee camps?
2. How could/ did Palestinians exercise their rights?
3. During the Intifada, through their actions, did Palestinians meet their responsibilities?
4. Did they act responsibly?
AS91283 Describe a social action that enables communities and/or nations to meet responsibilities and exercise rights
ACHIEVED
Describe the issue and related social action(s):
describe the issue: who, what, where, when, why and how
describe the social action: who, what and why

Perspectives:
describe points of view, values and perspectives that relate to the group(s)/individual(s) that participated in the social action

Exercising rights and meeting responsibilities
describe how this social action enables communities and/or nations to exercise rights.
describe how this social action enables communities and/or nations to meet responsibilities
Use concepts and specific evidence in each task
MERIT: Consequences
Describe, in depth, the consequences for individual(s) and society of the social action.

EXCELLENCE: Evaluation of effectiveness
Describe comprehensively a social action involves an evaluation of the effectiveness of the social action, including strengths, weaknesses, and appropriateness of the social action.
Formative Assessment
L.O's:
All

will be able to describe the issue, social actions and perspectives
Most
will be able to explain, using supporting evidence, the issue, social actions and perspectives
Some
will be able to comprehensively explain, using supporting evidence and concepts, the issue, social actions and perspectives
The Issue: Copenhagen Zoo is to put down a giraffe because it is not essential to the breeding programme
TASKS:
Using the resources consider Copenhagen Zoo's actions and complete the following:
a. What action did they take in response to the issue.
Copenhagen Zoo took action by...
b. Why did they take this action/ what is their view on the issue?
Copenhagen Zoo's believed that...
c. What values and worldviews do they hold that contributed to this view?
They think this because they value... this shows a ... worldview.
d. Did their action allow them to exercise their rights?
They were able to exercise their right to...
e. Did their action allow them to meet their responsibilities?
They did/ did not meet their responsibilities because...
TASK C: Consequences of the social action
TASK C: Evaluation of effectiveness
TASKS: Care2petition took action to stop the Copenhagen Zoo from putting Marius down. They created a petition which gained a and complete the following
1. Describe a consequence of their action for both individuals and society. Consequences may be short-term, long-term, positive, negative, social, economic etc
A consequence of Care2petition running the petition to save Marius the giraffe's life was...

2. Apply a concept in your answer.
A concept that applies to this is
change
because...
The Issue: Copenhagen Zoo is to put down a giraffe because it is not essential to the breeding programme
Let's mark an exemplar
TASK 2: indicate in the answer where they have done the following, use different colours for each
1. Evidence
2. Concepts
TASK 1: use the mark sheet to tick where...
they have completed the task
included specific evidence (put a tick for each piece of evidence)
Islam is the main religion of the Middle East. Sunni and Shiite are two different types of Islam. The Orthodox religions are Christian.
Exercising right and meeting responsibilities
PERSPECTIVES
TASKS: in pairs, take either Care2petition or Copenhagen zoo and complete the following
1. Were they able to exercise their rights? Which rights and how?
*include evidence and a concept in your answer
E.G Care2petition were able to exercise their right to...by..
2. Did they meet their responsibilities?
- what responsibilities do they have?
- Did they act responsibility in their action?

E.G Copenhagen Zoo had responsibilities to...
They did/ didnt act responsibly by euthanasing Marius because...
This relates to
values...
TASK: complete in groups, considering the consequences, evaluate the social action- strengths, weaknesses and progress on resolving the conflict
A strength of Care2petition's action was...
A weakness of Care2petition's action...
Overall, it made a little/ a fair amount/ considerable progress on resolving the conflict because...
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