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Highwic Proposition

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Ben Jarrett

on 11 May 2010

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Transcript of Highwic Proposition

This is due to the scalar nature of Prezi HIGHWIC PRESENTATION

This presentation will focus on
six areas derived from our research
that we believe are integral to the
successful Highwic experience.

Narrative
Branding
Interior
Furniture
Merchandise
Photography

All of the concepts are derived from the basic Venn diagram that we constructed at the beginning of the research phase. This diagram helped us to realise the core values of Education, Memory and Imagination. is the underlying tone that we are striving for. Our research indicates that Highwic,
and indeed the entire Historic Places Trust,
needs to target a younger demographic, while
maintaining its current attraction to the core
mature audience, in order to raise visibility,
expand the educational nature of the assets,
and increase revenue streams. The Key is a motif that we want to employ throughout the house as an agent of discovery. It is metaphorical as well as physical, allowing the user to engage on their terms. The Key will be used in lieu of a ticket. One of the challenges of any user experience design, is the subtle control of the emotional response. We intend to do this by creating a series of interventions that elevate the visitor's
encounter, by accentuating the stories and historical resonance implicit within the house. These devices are designed to pick up and enhance the existing narrative, not create an entirely new story. By mapping visitor's emotions as they
explore the house we can define where,
and what kind of interventions may be
successfully implemented. 1865
1864
1866
1867 1863 Family
Political Financial Auckland
New Zealand
World
At the beginning of 1865, Lincoln made Grant commander of all Union armies. Grant made his headquarters with the Army of the Potomac, and put Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman in command of most of the western armies. Grant understood the concept of total war and believed, along with Lincoln and Sherman, that only the utter defeat of Confederate forces and their economic base would bring an end to the war. This was total war not in terms of killing civilians but rather in terms of destroying homes, farms, and railroads. Grant devised a coordinated strategy that would strike at the entire Confederacy from multiple directions. Generals George Meade and Benjamin Butler were ordered to move against Lee near Richmond, General Franz Sigel (and later Philip Sheridan) were to attack the Shenandoah Valley, General Sherman was to capture Atlanta and march to the sea (the Atlantic Ocean), Generals George Crook and William W. Averell were to operate against railroad supply lines in West Virginia, and Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks was to capture Mobile, Alabama.
Union forces in the East attempted to maneuver past Lee and fought several battles during that phase ("Grant's Overland Campaign") of the Eastern campaign. Grant's battles of attrition at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor resulted in heavy Union losses, but forced Lee's Confederates to fall back repeatedly. An attempt to outflank Lee from the south failed under Butler, who was trapped inside the Bermuda Hundred river bend. Grant was tenacious and, despite astonishing losses (over 65,000 casualties in seven weeks), kept pressing Lee's Army of Northern Virginia back to Richmond. He pinned down the Confederate army in the Siege of Petersburg, where the two armies engaged in trench warfare for over nine months.
AMERICAN CIVIL WAR ABRAHAM LINCOLN ASSASSINATED Originally, John Wilkes Booth, a well-known actor and a Confederate spy from Maryland, had formulated a plan to kidnap Lincoln in exchange for the release of Confederate prisoners. After attending an April 11 speech in which Lincoln promoted voting rights for blacks, an incensed Booth changed his plans and determined to assassinate the president. •The Capital of New Zealand is moved from Auckland to Wellington.
•The Marlborough Times ceases publication. It was founded in 1864.
•18 February: The Press in Christchurch starts publishing a magazine, The Weekly Press. The magazine ran until 1928.
•May - The West Coast Times is founded. It began as a weekly newspaper and became a daily in January 1866. It ceased publishing in 1917
•4 June: The Evening Herald is founded in Wanganui. Around the turn of the century, it changed its name to The Wanganui Herald, and continued to publish until 1986.
•26 July: Parliament officially sits in Wellington for the first time, in the former Provincial Council chambers.
•30 August: The New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian publishes its last issue. It began in 1844.
•The Capital of New Zealand is moved from Auckland to Wellington.
•The Marlborough Times ceases publication. It was founded in 1864.
•18 February: The Press in Christchurch starts publishing a magazine, The Weekly Press. The magazine ran until 1928.
•May - The West Coast Times is founded. It began as a weekly newspaper and became a daily in January 1866. It ceased publishing in 1917
•4 June: The Evening Herald is founded in Wanganui. Around the turn of the century, it changed its name to The Wanganui Herald, and continued to publish until 1986.
•26 July: Parliament officially sits in Wellington for the first time, in the former Provincial Council chambers.
•30 August: The New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian publishes its last issue. It began in 1844.
Alfred Buckland was born at Newton Abbot, Devon, England, probably on 17 December 1825, and was baptised on 12 January 1826. He was the fifth son of John Buckland, a broker, and his wife, Elizabeth Mortimore. Alfred married Eliza Wallen at Stoke Damerel, Devon, on 26 May 1850. She died in Auckland, New Zealand, on 12 July 1866, and on 15 May 1867 Alfred married Matilda Jane Frodsham. A notable progenitor, he had seven daughters and three sons with his first wife and seven daughters and four sons with his second wife. He died in Auckland on 12 June 1903. Alfred Buckland was born at Newton Abbot, Devon, England, probably on 17 December 1825, and was baptised on 12 January 1826. He was the fifth son of John Buckland, a broker, and his wife, Elizabeth Mortimore. Alfred married Eliza Wallen at Stoke Damerel, Devon, on 26 May 1850. She died in Auckland, New Zealand, on 12 July 1866, and on 15 May 1867 Alfred married Matilda Jane Frodsham. A notable progenitor, he had seven daughters and three sons with his first wife and seven daughters and four sons with his second wife. He died in Auckland on 12 June 1903. Alfred Buckland was born at Newton Abbot, Devon, England, probably on 17 December 1825, and was baptised on 12 January 1826. He was the fifth son of John Buckland, a broker, and his wife, Elizabeth Mortimore. Alfred married Eliza Wallen at Stoke Damerel, Devon, on 26 May 1850. She died in Auckland, New Zealand, on 12 July 1866, and on 15 May 1867 Alfred married Matilda Jane Frodsham. A notable progenitor, he had seven daughters and three sons with his first wife and seven daughters and four sons with his second wife. He died in Auckland on 12 June 1903. The early user encounters: Branding, and the Reception room, will be covered later in this brief, but it is important to note that all the responses to the project are designed to complement and enhance each other and the experience as a whole. In the interpretation room, two touchscreens will enable the public to access historical information in an intuitive manner. By using a Prezi, such as you are viewing now, a vast quantity of information can be integrated into one screen that can be used by anyone. You are moving along a pre-defined path, but Prezi can also be randomly accessed using a touchscreen, or mouse. Please try this at the conclusion of this presentation. Prezi can embed all kinds of media, including video! We want to contextualise Highwic within the historical ascendancy of Auckland as a hub of commerce as well as an early Capital. Alfred Buckland and his family were intimately involved in this rollercoaster ride of financial gains and losses, as well as the emergent colony's independance from the Old Country. By placing of Highwic within a larger milieu, people can make connnections with the greater swathes of history, and also select their own level engagement within the educational experience offered at Highwic. As visitors move through the house, they will encounter select artifacts that dynamically rise the user engagement. This will vary from passive employment of ambient sound, to a contemporary mutoscope that focuses upon the family activated by the key.
A full outline of these devices will be given in the next presentation.
It is important to remember that..... THE END

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Please read the attached PDF document
for the information on further proposed deliverables.

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outside this message you can explore this Prezi.
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