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Pythagoras

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Ms. Kuts

on 30 May 2014

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Transcript of Pythagoras

Education
Birth and Death, Information About Life
Pythagoras

Accomplishments
Conclusion
Interesting Facts
Pythagoras

Around 570 BC Pythagoras was born in Samos, Tonia, Greece. Sadly, Pythagoras died around the years 495 BC in Metapontum, Luciana.

Pythagoras was born in the island of Samos in around 569 BC. His father, Mnesarchus, was a merchant and his mother Pythais, was a native of Samos. He was intelligent, well-educated. Pythagoras was also fond of poetry and recited the poems of Homer. There are very few records regarding Pythagoras’s personal life. According to some historical accounts, Pythagoras married Theano, who was a native of Croton. He had one son named Telauges and three daughters Myia, Damo and Arignote.

Pythagoras was well educated, and he played the lyre throughout his lifetime, knew poetry and recited Homer. He was interested in mathematics, philosophy, astronomy and music, and was greatly influenced by Pherekydes (philosophy), Thales (mathematics and astronomy) and Anaximander (philosophy, geometry).
Contributions
Pythagoras made influential contributions to mathematics, philosophy and religious teaching in the late 6th century BC. For example, on contribution is that he is best known for the Pythagorean Theorem, a theorem in geometry that states that in a right-angled triangle the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle), c, is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, b and a—that is, a² + b² = c². In addition, he also developed the musical scale that is used by all Western countries today. These were some of the influential contribution Pythagoras made.
Pythagoras had many accomplishments. For example, Pythagorean Theorem, a theorem in geometry that states that in a right-angled triangle the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle), c, is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, b and a—that is, a² + b² = c². In addition, Pythagoras discovered that musical notes could be translated into mathematical equations was when one day he passed blacksmiths at work, and thought that the sounds emanating from their anvils being hit were beautiful and harmonious and decided that whatever scientific law caused this to happen must be mathematical and could be applied to music. Pythagoras believed in something called the "harmony of the spheres." He believed that the planets and stars moved according to mathematical equations, which corresponded to musical notes and thus produced a symphony. These were some of Pythagoras accomplishments.
1. Pythagoras was also called Pythagoras of Samos or Pythagoras the Samian.

2. Pythagoras was born on an island called Samos. When he was young, he engaged in many different travels, including Egypt and other locations that piqued his interest in gaining more knowledge.
3. When Pythagoras moved to Croton in about 530 BC, he set up his religious sect in the Greek colony located in southern Italy. He attracted followers that embraced his religious rites and practices. They spent time studying his philosophical theories as well
.
4. Pythagoras is responsible for creating the Pythagorean theorem:, which states that the sum of the areas of two squares on the legs (called a and b) equals the area of the square on the hypotenuse (c).
The Pythagorean Theorem is one of the most famous and fundamental mathematical concepts in history. You, as a student, will use this formula countless times throughout your academic career. Every time you see a right triangle in this course, or a unit circle in pre-calculus, or vectors in calculus, you will have the Pythagorean Theorem at your side ready to be applied to any or all of the right triangles you encounter.
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