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Super cool Prezi!

These are vector maps of the United States and the World. These maps have maximum zoomability because they are vector images. Use these as a template to display a location within your presentation.
by

Ryan Crosswait

on 11 April 2011

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Transcript of Super cool Prezi!

Boxing There were no weight classes within the mens' and boys' divisions; opponents for a match were chosen randomly. Ancient Culture Sports Egypt Ancient Egyptians played a game that is similar to our present-day hockey. Drawings on tombs at Beni Hassan in Menia Governorate show players holding bats made of long palm-tree branches, with a bent end similar to that of the hockey bat. The hockey ball was made of compressed papyrus fibers covered with two pieces of leather in the shape of a semicircle. The ball was dyed in two or more colors.

This primitive "hockey" game is still practiced in the Egyptian countryside.
Weightlifting was one of the sports known by the ancient Egyptians. One method of weightlifting was the attempt to lift a heavy sack of sand with one hand (clean and jerk lift) and keep it high in a quasi-vertical position. The player had to stay in that position for a short period. This is one of the rules of weightlifting applied till now.

Ancient Egyptians practiced sports in order to keep well and slim. The picture represents an equilibrium of two players opposite each other standing on their heels, their bodies stretched in a slanting position while holding hands with two other players.

The four players turn round and round while maintaining their positions in perfect equilibrium and harmony of movement. Ancient Egyptians practiced field and track sports such as the high jump. Two players sat opposite each other with legs stretched, with one player's feet on top of the toes of the other. If the third player managed to jump over that barrier, the two sitting players placed their palms on top of their feet to heighten the barrier which the third player had to jump across without touching.

This game is still practiced in the Egyptian countryside and is called "goose steps". This is an ancient Egyptian game in which two players compete in pulling the hoop swiftly. Each contestant fixes a hooked staff to hinder any snatch of the hoop by the other player. This game needs sharp physical maneuvers and strict observation, particularly because the hooked staff is used both to pull the hoop and support it from falling flat on the floor. Greece Boxing There were no weight classes within the mens' and boys' divisions; opponents for a match were chosen randomly. Ancient boxing had fewer rules than the modern sport. Boxers fought without rounds until one man was knocked out, or admitted he had been beaten. Unlike the modern sport, there was no rule against hitting an opponent when he was down. Instead of gloves, ancient boxers wrapped leather thongs (himantes) around their hands and wrists which left their fingers free. Equestrian events There were both 2-horse chariot and 4-horse chariot races, with separate races for chariots drawn by foals. Another race was between carts drawn by a team of 2 mules. The course was 12 laps around the stadium track (9 miles). The course was 6 laps around the track (4.5 miles), and there were separate races for full-grown horses and foals. Jockeys rode without stirrups. Only wealthy people could afford to pay for the training, equipment, and feed of both the driver (or jockey) and the horses. As a result, the owner received the olive wreath of victory instead of the driver or jockey. Chariot Racing Riding Pentathlon This was a 5-event combination of discus, javelin, jumping, running and wrestling. The ancient Greeks considered the rhythm and precision of an athlete throwing the discus as important as his strength.

The discus was made of stone, iron, bronze, or lead, and was shaped like a flying saucer. Sizes varied, since the boys' division was not expected to throw the same weight as the mens'. The javelin was a man-high length of wood, with either a sharpened end or an attached metal point. It had a thong for a hurler's fingers attached to its center of gravity, which increased the precision and distance of a javelin's flight. Athletes used lead or stone jump weights (halteres) shaped like telephone receivers to increase the length of their jump. The halteres were held in front of the athlete during his ascent, and forcibly thrust behind his back and dropped during his descent to help propel his body further. There were 4 types of races at Olympia. The stadion was the oldest event of the Games. Runners sprinted for 1 stade (192 m.), or the length of the stadium. The other races were a 2-stade race (384 m.), and a long-distance run which ranged from 7 to 24 stades (1,344 m. to 4,608 m.). And if these races weren't enough, the Greeks had one particularly grueling event which we lack. There was also a 2 to 4-stade (384 m. to 768 m.) race by athletes in armor. This race was especially useful in building the speed and stamina that Greek men needed during their military service. If we remember that the standard hoplite armor (helmet, shield, and greaves)weighed about 50-60 lbs, it is easy to imagine what such an event must have been like. Like the modern sport, an athlete needed to throw his opponent on the ground, landing on a hip, shoulder, or back for a fair fall. 3 throws were necessary to win a match. Biting was not allowed, and genital holds were also illegal. Attacks such as breaking your opponent's fingers were permitted. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Olympics/sports.html

Sport and Society in Ancient Greece - Mark Golden One of the most popular indoor activities was a board game known as senet. (houses) of three rows of 10 squares. Pieces of the opposing sides were distinguished by their size, color or shape. Each opponent usually had seven pieces.

Moves were determined by throwing sticks, or "astragals (knuckle-bones). The object was to move the pieces around a snaking track to the finish, landing on a number of specially marked squares representing good or bad fortune. Senet, which means "passing" became so popular it took on religious significance. References
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senet
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/games.htm
http://www.ancientegyptianfacts.com/index.html
Games of the ancient egyptians-raymond binder



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