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Phd

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Lee Ashton

on 26 March 2015

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Transcript of Phd

Study 2: Mixed methods study.
Study 3: Pilot study - Healthy Lifestyle Program
Timeline and development
Study 1: Scoping review of risk behaviours in young men
Aim: provide a broad overview of interventions that have either examined risk behaviours exclusively in young adult male sample populations and those that have reported outcomes stratified by age and/or sex to include young adult males and map the existing literature to date.
Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health.
Lee Ashton
PhD candidate (Nutrition & Dietetics)
Thesis by publication

Supervised by:
Prof Clare Collins
Prof Philip Morgan
Dr Melinda Hutchesson
Dr Megan Rollo

Overweight/obese: 42% vs 35%

Prevalence of substance abuse disorder: 16% vs 10%

Rate of sucicide: 17.7 deaths per 100,000 vs 6.8 deaths per 100,000

Alcohol levels at short term health risk: 68% vs 59%

Tobacco smoking on daily basis: 18% vs 14%

97% of young men did not consume adequate intakes of fruit and veg. (same in women)
Young Australian men vs Young australian women (ABS 2012)
Globally, young men have a higher prevalence of hypertension than young women (13% vs 7%)
The global prevalence of young men with type 2 diabetes is between 2-6%
Cigarette smoking in young men: 38% vs young women: 30%
US statistics
Mortality from risk behaviours (suicide, motor vehicle accidents and unintentional injuries) in young men: 137 per 100,000 deaths vs young women 49.3 per 100,000
Globally 20% of young men fail to meet national recommendations for physical activity.
Current Alcohol drinker in young men: 85% vs young women 71%.

More than half of the young adult men in the USA are exceeding daily maximum recommended alcohol intakes (classed as 4 drinks in single day for men)
Why do young men undertake risky behaviours?
Questions?
Background
Aims
1. Examine the extent, range and nature of research focusing on risk behaviours in young males

2. Identify the barriers and motivators in adopting healthy eating, engaging in physical activity and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight in young adult males.

3. Explore young males’ preferences for intervention components and delivery medium for a healthy lifestyle program.

4. Determine whether a tailored healthy lifestyle program, developed based on a participatory approach can result in improvements in mental health and well-being, dietary intake and physical activity levels in young adult males aged 18-25.
Plan of research
"Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature."
Study 2:
"Using a mixed-methods approach to understanding young adult male’s motivators and barriers to participating in a healthy lifestyle program"
Study 3:
"Pilot study: tailored Healthy Lifestyle Program specific to young adult men (aged 18-25 years)
Study 1
Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health.
Other results
The most common study design was randomized controlled trials (62%).

Face-to-face was the most common form of intervention delivery (70%)

Majority were conducted in University settings (46%).
Recommendations for research
Participatory approach and use of appropriate theoretical framework for development

Better reporting

Recruit representative samples

Interventions targeting self harm, poor diet, unsafe driving, tobacco use, drug use, sun exposure, violence and gambling in young men are warranted.
Aims (focus group):

1. Identify the barriers and motivators in adopting healthy eating, engaging in physical activity and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight in young adult males.

2. To determine whether these behaviours are valued and whether young men perceive weight gain to be a problem.

3. Identify young adult male’s motivators and barriers to participating in a healthy lifestyle program.

4. Explore young males’ preferences for intervention components and delivery medium for a healthy lifestyle program.


Barriers
Lack of skills/knowledge

Lack of time

cost
Motivators
Body image

Health

Girls - "get chicks"
Benefits expected from healthy lifestyle program
Improved appearance

feel better

social/ make friends

Habit forming i.e. lifetime skills
Preferences for healthy lifestyle program
Multi-modal

Free/cheap alternatives

Develop skills i.e cooking lessons

Individualized and flexible

2-3 sessions per week
Online survey
n=300 young men in Australia (18-25yr)

Deployed using survey monkey

Gain further understanding of focus group questions

Assess PA level. dietary intake & mental well-being
Healthy Lifestyle Program for young men
2013
2014
2015
2016
Conference Presentations
Poster
ANZOS (2013)
ICO (2014)
Oral
Plan to have international oral presentation in 2015 (ISBNPA) & national conference in 2014 (ANZOS)
Media release
(Kearney 2005)
(Bauman 2009)
(IDF 2013)
(Substance abuse and mental health services association 2009)
(Park 2006)
(Chen 2004)
References
1. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Health Survey: First results 2011-2012. 2012 [cited 2014 2nd April]; Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4364.0.55.001main+features12011-12.


2. Bauman, A., et al., The International Prevalence Study on Physical Activity: results from 20 countries. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 2009. 6: p. 21.


3. Chen, C.M., M.C. Dufour, and H.-y. Yi, Alcohol consumption among young adults ages 18-24 in the United States: Results from the 2001-2002 NESARC Survey. Alcohol Research & Health, 2004


4. Fryar CD, Statistics NCfH: Smoking and alcohol behaviors reported by adults: United States, 1999-2002: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics; 2006

5. International Diabetes Federation. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 6th edn. 2013 [cited 2014 13th February]; Available from: http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas.

6. Kearney, P.M., et al., Global burden of hypertension: analysis of worldwide data. The Lancet, 2005. 365(9455): p. 217-223.

7. Park, M.J., et al., The health status of young adults in the United States. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2006. 39(3): p. 305-317.

8. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings. Rockville (MD): US Department of Health and Human Services. 2009, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies.
Based on response from focus groups and online survey

Program will also be guided based on:
Expertise and experience of research team
Young men steering committee
National guidelines
Appropriate theoretical frameworks
1. Ashton, LM. Hutchesson, MJ. Rollo, ME. Morgan, PJ. & Collins CE. (Under review) Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature.
BMC public health.

2. Ashton, LM. Hutchesson, MJ. Rollo, ME. Morgan, PJ. & Collins CE. (Exp 2015) Using a mixed-methods approach to understanding young adult male’s motivators and barriers to participating in a healthy lifestyle program.
International Journal of Men's Health.

3.
Ashton, LM. Hutchesson, MJ. Rollo, ME. Morgan, PJ. Collins CE. (Exp 2016) Process, impact and outcome evaluation of Healthy lifestyle program for young adult men (18-25 years)
International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
Proposed publications
(NHANES 2006)
Participants
Aim to recruit 60 young men aged 18-25 from Newcastle

Sessions will be split by BMI

So far we have conducted 7 focus groups with 42 young men.
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