Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Plant Movements

No description
by

Megan Myers

on 18 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Plant Movements

By: Megan Myers Plant
Movements Related to the young parts of the plants
Move very slowly
Effected by internal and external stimuli Growth Movements Nutations Nodding Movements Twining Movements Contraction Movements Nastic Movements Phototropism Gravitropism Other Tropisms Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Results from changes in internal water pressure
Initiated by contact with objects outside of the plant Turgor Movements Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Circadian Rhythms Solar Tracking Water Conservation Movements Miscellaneous Movements Gliding Movements Dehydration Movements Explosive Forces Happens in the legume family (such as garden beans)
Slow, oscillating movement, as the seed pushes through the soil
This movement facilitates the progress of the growing plant tip through the soil Nodding Movements When a plant grows in a spiral formation
Common in most plants Nutation Growth responses to the stimulus of gravity so that the plant stay oriented relative to the source of gravity
Primary roots are positive while shoots of plants are negative
Statoliths - the gravity sensors in the plant
Plant organs feel movement of amyloplast towards gravity to know which way to grow Gravitropism When a plant grows towards the light
When a plants roots grow deeper into the ground because they are insensitive to light
Different intensities of light change the way the plants are effected
Anyone who has grown plants near a window knows the plants tend to lean towards the window where the light is stronger
Plants can alter their growth so they can grow into more favorable condition Phototropism Aerotropism - plants respond to oxygen Other Tropisms When organs (leaves, petals) expand from buds they alternate in bending up and down
Nondirectional/Alternating movements in an organ are called "nastic"
Occur in response to environmental stimuli, but the direction of the response is not dependent on the direction of the stimulus Nastic Movements Occurs when the cells in the stem of the plant elongate and cause spiraling growth
Stimulated internally, externally, and through contraction
With contraction: elongation of cells on one side of the stem and shrinkage of cells on the other side Twining Movements Contractile roots pull the plants more into the ground
This produces bulbs in the ground
The shrinking of the roots may take place at a rate of 2.2 millimeters per day Contraction Movements Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Hangarter, R. (2000). Plants in motion. Retrieved from http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/index.html. 22 September 2012. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Hangarter, R. (2000). Plants in motion. Retrieved from http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/index.html. 22 September 2012. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Hangarter, R. (2000). Plants in motion. Retrieved from http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/index.html. 22 September 2012. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Hangarter, R. (2000). Plants in motion. Retrieved from http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/index.html. 22 September 2012. Submicroscopic fibrils produce rhythmic waves that bring about the motion of plants slowly going back and forth or sliding up and down against each other
The friction set up by the process propels the organisms through the water where they are found Gliding Movements Rain and dew causes the mature fruits to open due to the swelling of membranes. The pressure inside builds up and the seeds are expelled from the stalk in distances of up to 33 feet. Explosive Forces The forces are purely physical and do not involve living cells or hormones
Caused by the drying out of the tissues and membranes in the plant
Plans coil up during the day and relax at night. This alternating movement "screws" the plants into the ground Dehydration Movements Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. The folding and unfoliding on the leaves in regular daily cycles
Controlled by the plants "biological clock"
Caused by the passage of water in and out of the cells at the bases of the leaves or leaflets
Even in the absence of a daily change in environmental cues the plant can still keep its clock-like rhythms and continue for several days Circadian Rhythms Water Conservation Movements When the leaves twist in response to illumination and become perpendicularly oriented to a light source
Also known as heliotropisms
Unlike phototropic responses of stems and roots, growth is not involved Solar Tracking Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill. Bidlack, J. E., & Jansky, S. H. (2011). Stern's introductory plant biology. (12 ed., Vol. , pp. 198-206). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Hangarter, R. (2000). Plants in motion. Retrieved from http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/index.html. 22 September 2012. Leaves of grasses have cells with thin walls so during periods when sufficient water is not available these cells lose their turgor and the leaves roll up
This rolling reduces transpiration in the plant http://kasei.us/archives/2008/05/11/tulips.jpg Example http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/nastic/nutations/tulipnutation.html Example http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/tropism/phototropism/corn/cornworship.html http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8e/Phototropism.jpg/220px-Phototropism.jpg http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/tropism/gravitropism/sunflower/sunflowergravi.html Example http://www.visualphotos.com/photo/1x8469283/gravitropism_geotropism_bj1491.jpg Example http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/tropism/solartrack/solartrack.html http://www.vantagewire.com/article_images/sunflowers_rz.jpg Examples http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/nastic/flytrap/flytrap.html http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mapzil8dZ51qkduzpo1_500.gif http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/nastic/mimosa/mimosa.html Example http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/nastic/twining/vines.html http://imgc.allpostersimages.com/images/P-473-488-90/38/3811/42SIF00Z/posters/adam-jones-common-morning-glory-ipomoea-purpurea-twining-up-a-corn-stalk-north-america.jpg Example http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/movements/leafmovements/bean/beansleep.html http://mycozynook.com/33_10SleepMovements-L.jpg http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_zaTGmjsKuRs/TS-rAcYIO1I/AAAAAAAAA1w/3qnGOoBbiR0/s1600/IMG_0174.JPG http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_zaTGmjsKuRs/TS-rAcYIO1I/AAAAAAAAA1w/3qnGOoBbiR0/s1600/IMG_0174.JPG Chemotropism - plants respond to chemicals Thermotropism - plants respond to temperature Traumotropism - plants respond to wounding Electrotropism - plants respond to electricity Skototropism - plants respond to darkness (plant roots) http://www.ars.usda.gov/images/docs/7647_7841/2005-X-PlantRoot.jpg http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/pekoppa.jpg http://img.ehowcdn.com/article-new/ehow/images/a06/ca/lc/plant-bulbs-late-800x800.jpg http://ecowomen.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/flowerbulbs1.jpg http://www.sciencephoto.com/image/33716/530wm/B7870270-Close-up_of_a_seed_of_an_erodium_plant-SPL.jpg http://www.cas.vanderbilt.edu/bioimages/biohires/i/himca--fr29363.jpg http://razottoli.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/blue-green-zone-bi-oscillatoria-oct-22-2011.jpg http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-zmRKNt8TztI/T_8bIp_FvEI/AAAAAAAAAGE/-pvZE0r9lxs/s1600/upright+rolled+leaf+2.jpg
Full transcript