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Selaginella Lepidophylla

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Michy Dude

on 14 November 2013

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Transcript of Selaginella Lepidophylla

Selaginella Lepidophylla
Adaptations
Needs

aka Resurrecting Fern
Unique Adaptations
Watch it grow...
More Images...
Bibliography....

Selaginella lepidophylla is also known as the resurrecting fern, Jericho, the rose of Jericho, resurrection plant/moss, dinosaur plant, siempre viva, stone flower, and doradilla. Its most well-known, unique adaptation is its ability to shrivel up after a period of time with little to no water, and then 'resurrect' when moisture is returned to the plant. Even though it seems like selaginella lepidophylla resurrects, that is not the case. In its natural dry habitat, the resurrection fern, also known as the selaginella lepidophylla, has its roots in the ground and remains green and growing as long as it is hydrated. If the resurrection fern is not hydrated it simply just retrieves its roots from the ground, shrivels up into a ball, and allows the wind to carry it. Because the resurrection fern is able to survive without water for long periods of time, its chances of survival in its preferred habitat: in a desert, increase immensely. Surprisingly the resurrection fern can not only go for days without water, but it can go for up to fifty years without a drop of any kind of moisture before dying. After just under forty-eight hours of hydration, the resurrection fern is able to return to its former state and size. Selaginella lepidophylla is from the spikemoss family (selaginellaceae) and is perennial.


Selaginella lepidophylla is also known as the resurrecting fern, Jericho, the rose of Jericho, resurrection plant/moss, dinosaur plant, siempre viva, stone flower, and doradilla. Its most well-known, unique adaptation is its ability to shrivel up after a period of time with little to no water, and then 'resurrect' when moisture is returned to the plant. Even though it seems like selaginella lepidophylla resurrects, that is not the case. In its natural dry habitat, the resurrection fern, also known as the selaginella lepidophylla, has its roots in the ground and remains green and growing as long as it is hydrated. If the resurrection fern is not hydrated it simply just retrieves its roots from the ground, shrivels up into a ball, and allows the wind to carry it. Because the resurrection fern is able to survive without water for long periods of time, its chances of survival in its preferred habitat: in a desert, increase immensely. Surprisingly the resurrection fern can not only go for days without water, but it can go for up to fifty years without a drop of any kind of moisture before dying. After just under forty-eight hours of hydration, the resurrection fern is able to return to its former state and size. Selaginella lepidophylla is from the spikemoss family (selaginellaceae) and is perennial.

Selaginella lepidophylla plants need either starch or sugars from photosynthesis (both come from chloroplasts in either a dry state or a hydrated state), they need water at least every fifty years and in order to remain in its more productive hydrated state, and it needs to be in a hot temperature (due its natural habitat being in deserts or areas with similar conditions) to survive. The fern does not need to ever be in a dry state but it does need water within an average of every fifty years or it will surely die.
When comparing selaginella lepidophylla to other plants, it is noticed that selaginella lepidophylla plant’s chloroplasts have special features that enable them to consume starch rather than using photosynthetic processes during dry times. And selaginella plants do not need to obtain nutrients from soil in order to survive like other plants as often, but instead are able to absorb nutrients when dried up in a ball. While other plants are able to store water when the soil is drying up, selaginella lepidophylla plants cannot. The resurrection fern is able to remain in a dormant-like state a lot longer than most plants, and it able to survive/thrive in hot desert climates. The roots and branches of the resurrection fern appear similar to other ferns on the outside, but is proven very different when it comes to cell structure. Because the resurrection fern is able to crush and deform its structures within its cells, it must also have mechanisms to allow it to reform and reorganize its cellular structures. These special mechanisms are unnecessary to other plants in more moderate environments, and to plants without special adaptations such as what the resurrection fern has.

Comparison of Adaptations
Reproduction
For reproduction, selaginella lepidophylla either uses spores (either to create sperm and eggs for sexual reproduction, or to grow a new plant) and those who grow selaginella lepidophylla tend to use cuttings for reproduction. Seeds germinate around the mother plant in moist soil, but if the seeds are in rough soil conditions chances of growth are slim, and the seedling will probably wither and die. If the seedling does have good enough conditions around it, the seedling will grow out of the soil looking almost like a clover, with two leaves to start with and then will grow branches and more leaves out if its center about where the plant touches the ground. The fern will also produce flowers to be pollinated by surrounding insects.
Wikipedia (June 12, 2013) Selaginella Lepidophylla
URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selaginella_lepidophylla
Accessed: November 13, 2013

Sam Lennart and Jonathon Sanne, (November 11, 2013), Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla), Azarius
URL: http://azarius.net/lifestyle/fun_stuff/gadgets/rose_of_jericho/
Accessed: November 13, 2013


krzysiu.net, (June 12, 2013), The Rushing World: uncurling rose of Jericho, krzysiu.net
URL:
Accessed: November 8, 2013
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOE12IUdUAA
David Wm. Reed, (September 21, 2007), Weird Plants, Horticulture and the Science of Plants, Youth Adventure Program
URL: http://hort201.tamu.edu/YouthAdventureProgram/index.html
Accessed: November 8, 2013
Unbelievable Facts, (August 12, 2013), Selaginella lepidophylla "Dinosaur Plant" with amazing ability, Unbelievable Facts
URL: http://unbelievable-facts.tumblr.com/post/58045550421/there-is-a-plant-called-selaginella-lepidophylla-dinosau
Accessed: November 13, 2013

Growth
This image shows the basic growth cycle of ferns. In this case, the resurrection fern grows exactly like the image shows
Paul A. Thomas and Mel P. Garber, (November 13, 2013), Growing Ferns, The University of Georgia
URL: http://www.caes.uga.edu/publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=5996
Accessed: November 13, 2013
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