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The Jamaican Boa

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by

David Johnson

on 20 January 2014

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Transcript of The Jamaican Boa

Habitat
They live in both forest and woodland type biomes. Including humid, tropical and mountainous forest, dry limestone scrub-forest, moist woodland, swampland and mangroves.
Facts on the Jamaican Boa
Facts on the Jamaican Boa continued
This reptile is only found in Jamaica and is the island’s largest, native, terrestrial predator. The coloration of the Jamaican boa varies over its length, with the upper part of the head usually appearing grey or olive-green, becoming golden yellow, orange or reddish-brown on the front part of the body. Their mating season is between February and April, they hunt their prey in the night and they can live up to 30 years.
Did you know??
Why are they endangered?
The decline in the population of the Jamaican boa snake has been going on for centuries. It began in the early 1700s when the Europeans colonized the island and introduced non native species like pigs, mongoose and domestic cats which preyed on the snakes. The destruction of the snake’s natural habitat to make way for farms and bauxite mines have further depleted the population and natives mistakenly believe the snake is venomous and attack and kill any snakes they find. The Jamaican boa is listed as a vulnerable species and unless steps are taken to protect the snake, it is estimated that it will be extinct in about 100 years.
Why we should save this animal?
Contrary to the belief of the natives, the snake is not only non venomous, it is actually beneficial to farmers since it preys on rats and other rodents which eat sugar cane, one of the most famous crops of Jamaica. In fact there are no species of venomous snake on the island of Jamaica, just the yellow snake and the grass snake which are harmless to humans.
The Jamaican Boa
The Jamaican Boa AKA the yellow snake is a endangered species and a part of the Animalia kingdom.Its scientific name is Epicrates subflavus and is also a nonvenomous snake From the neck to the tail the body acquires an increasing degree of black coloration, with black cross bands on a yellow background exhibited on the mid-section, merging to form an almost uniform black region at the rear. This animal is a predator who eats rodents, native bats, and bats. This snake is also a second level consumer in its food web.
The Jamaican boa is listed as a vulnerable species and unless steps are taken to protect the snake, it is estimated that it will be extinct in about 100 years.
It is actually beneficial to farmers since it preys on rats and other rodents which eat sugar cane, one of the staple crops of Jamaica.
The yellow snake is more closely related to the African and South Asian python than it is to the South American boa constrictor.
How can we save the Jamaican Boa
We plan to save the Jamaican Boa by creating laws to save this reptile from being hunted by humans and by keeping them in places like zoo's to keep them from being extinct. Ever since Europeans came to Jamaica the Jamaican Boa's population seemed to decrease severely. The way to protect the Boa requires
knowledge of the boas basic ecology, particularly its movement patterns and activity
ranges, as well as an end to persecution and poaching. The price of helping the Jamaican Boa and how long it will take to save them is still unknown but by stopping the poaching for example we can save these reptiles.
Cite Sources
http://globerove.com/jamaica/jamaican-boa-snake-facts/4915
http://www.arkive.org/jamaican-boa/epicrates-subflavus/image-G38520.html
http://www.jacksonvillezoo.org/index.php/animals/jamaican_boa_conservation
Full transcript