Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Home Is So Sad by Phillip Larkin

No description
by

Abigail Hall

on 27 February 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Home Is So Sad by Phillip Larkin

Language analysis..
Home is so Sad
by Phillip Larkin

We will discuss:
Form
Structure
Key language
Links to other poems
lets look a little further!!......
Structure
Quick Context check-up!!
Links to other poems..
Originally published in Larkin's 1964 release 'The Whitsun Weddings', the poem is regarded as one of the
more unknown works of Larkin,
straying in the shadows of more popular works such as 'The Whitsun Weddings' and 'Days'.

The Cold War was taking place in 1964, and it marked the
start of British pop music
invading the USA with the release of the Beatles.
Two Stanzas:
five lines each.
repetitive structure.
Home is so sad. It stays as it was left,
Shaped to the comfort of the last to go
As if to win them back. Instead, bereft
Of anyone to please, it withers so,
Having no heart to put aside the theft

And turn again to what it started as,
A joyous shot at how things ought to be,
Long fallen wide. You can see how it was:
Look at the pictures and the cutlery.
The music in the piano stool. That vase.
Home is so sad. It stays as it was left,
Shaped to the comfort of the last to go
As if to win them back. Instead, bereft
Of anyone to please, it withers so,
Having no heart to put aside the theft

And turn again to what it started as,
A joyous shot at how things ought to be,
Long fallen wide. You can see how it was:
Look at the pictures and the cutlery.
The music in the piano stool. That vase,
the change in tone, from personifying the house in the first stanza to the "turn" of a reflection on "how thing ought to be"
we lose the character of the house in the second stanza. This is shown through the itemising of the house at the very end of the poem.
this may be due to the absence of people living within the house, causing it to lose its 'persona'
}
the personifictation of the house - may be that due to the absence of people, the house must make its own persona.
Larkin uses an ABABA CDCDC rhyme scheme. The second stanza is composed of mostly half rhymes; ‘as’, ‘was’, ‘vase’ with ‘be’ and ‘cutlery’ forming the only full rhymes of the stanza.
A
B
A
B
A

C
D
C
D
C
Relationship is between a house and it's owners - realtionship with an object links to 'Arudel Tomb' with people's feelings towards a tomb.
Theme of absence within a room or house links to 'Mr Bleaney'
The universal tone through the vague descriptions in 'Home is so Sad' and 'Toads Revisited'.
The theme of 'The Ordinary' linked with many of Larkins poems.
Two short stanzas links to 'Days' - brevity of the poems
Theme of life and death? How the House has to 'move on' after the life within the house leaves.
THeme of expectations vs reality as seen in "Talking in Bed" - used through the word "ought" used in both poems.
This emphasises the feeling of lonliness Larkin wants to make us feel.
Questions to think about:
Why did Larkin personify the house?
What is Larkin trying to make us feel?
How is this poem different to his other poems?
narrative gives the home emotion and sentimentality which decreases the distance between man and object
sense of longing to be loved
Use of the word 'home' instead if 'house'. Home has much warmer connotatios of love, foreshadowing the fact the house is longing for the love it used to have
use of caesura creates a pause, to reflect a sense of reminising, or maybe a cry of pain,/suffering.
the white space in between the stanzas creates a sense of hesitation, the house is in denial to accept the fact it's unloved.
the word 'sad' is so simple, Larkin uses simplistic language to mirror the houses plainness and creates a melancholic tone, as if the house has given up.
the word "ought" reflects the theme of expectations vs reality - Larkin also used this word in "Talking In Bed"
Home is so sad. It stays as it was left,
Shaped to the comfort of the last to go
As if to win them back. Instead, bereft
Of anyone to please, it withers so,
Having no heart to put aside the theft

And turn again to what it started as,
A joyous shot at how things ought to be,
Long fallen wide. You can see how it was:
Look at the pictures and the cutlery.
The music in the piano stool. That vase,
Larkin once said that he wanted his poems
to be readable in a pub, the declarative "home
is so sad" allows this to immediately be accessible
to the reader due to it being such a blunt, open statement.
we can see a lack of adjectives and imagery as
we see in the last list.
Larkin strips this description to bare minimum,
making it more univeral, that this could be in
anyones lost home.
preposition 'as' and the verb 'was are synonyms of the past tense' reflecting the sense of nostalgia
literal theft? the house feels it has been stolen of love, yet no one has the heart to care.
the ‘vase’ is the only object mentioned that does not carry any of this implication of occupancy. It's there for display. It does not move. It does not really imply or act as evidence for human activity. It remains in one place, frozen, accumulating dust
the fact the poem ends on this static object reflects the static nature of the house. It's the last item we remember, as if the previous life of the house has been forgotten.
this links to is repetititve theme within his poems of the ordianary.
Larkins purpose...
adverb "so" intensifies the sadness the home feels.
enjambment throughout the poem, to exaggerate the ongoing struggle the house feels to get over the loss of its owners.
deprived/ lacking in something
the extremely short fragment line emphasizes how demoralized and broken down the house has become
sense of emptiness, despite the fact it's a 'home' it mirrors the structure of a 'house'
Full transcript