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Exposure - Film Photography

www.bhssfinearts.org - Photography, Department of Fine Arts, Bloomington High School South. Staci Jennings, Ran Cao
by

Ran Cao

on 12 August 2013

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Transcript of Exposure - Film Photography

LIGHT
BEST TIME TO SHOOT
for beginners
"Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography."
---George Eastman
3 hours after sunrise and 3 hours before sunset
R.Cao, flickr
be aware of camera shake when shooting hand held using slow shutter speed

the safe hand held shutter speed can be determined by taking the reciprocal of the lens' focal length, measured in mm

example: 50mm lens - 1/50 sec max

use a tripod when exceeding max
AMOUNT OF TIME THAT THE SHUTTER CURTAIN IS LIFTED
the shutter speed controls amount of motion recorded
shutter speed
aperture
film sensitivity
SIZE OF THE LENS' OPENING
SENSITIVITY OF THE FILM
graininess increases (quality decreases) with increased sensitivity
located in the lens

metal rings that open and close to let in light.

works like the pupil of an eye

usually produce the sharpest images between f/5.6 and f/11
f/2.0
f/2.8
f/4.0
f/5.6
f/8
f/11
camerashymom, flickr
dannotti, flickr
R.Cao, flickr
kktp_, flickr
Jeff Kubina, flickr
ISO 100
ISO 200
ISO 400
ISO 800
ISO 1600
for beginners, use 400 speed film. its sensitivity is good for both indoor and outdoor lighting, relatively cheap and readily available
Alex Frasquet, flickr
megascapes, flickr
Pedro Moura Pinheiro, flickr
laurenlemon, flickr
Jay Tankersley Photography, flickr
stacijennings, flickr
shallow depth of field: the object photographed is in focus, foreground and background out of focus. Use to emphasize subject.

deep depth of field: the object photographed is in focus, forground and background also in focus.
the aperture controls the amount of area in focus (depth of field)
1/1000 sec
1/500 sec
1/250 sec
1/125 sec
1/60 sec
1/30 sec
1/15 sec
1.25 sec in 25 sec @1000 fps
A FAST SHUTTER SPEED FREEZES ACTION

A SLOW SHUTTER SPEED BLURS ACTION
located inside the camera body

blades made of metal or silk/cloth

works kind of like your eyelids

set to prevailing light condition

for beginners ----- sunny: 1/250 s, cloudy/shade: 1/125 s
metering and bracketing
shutter speed
film sensitivity
aperture
grain
motion
depth
meter can be fooled in high contrast scenes
metered exposure
+1 EV
-1 EV
1/160, f/8, iso 200
1/320, f/8, iso 200
1/80, f/8, iso 200
bracket by changing shutter speed to maintain depth of field

bracket by changing aperture to maintain motion recorded
sensor that measures the amount of light entering the lens

calculate if the settings will record enough light to get a correct exposure
philippe leroyer, flickr
Keith Morris, flickr
consider the triangle as the correct exposure

if you change one angle of the triangle, you have to change the other angles accordingly in order to maintain the triangle (180 deg), or in this case, the correct exposure
METER
bracketing can increase your chance of getting the best exposure
be aware that you are NOT changing the film's sensitivity by setting it on the camera

you are "telling" the camera what the film's sensitivity is so the meter could work correctly
f/2.0
f/2.8
f/4.0
f/5.6
f/8
f/11
f/16
be very precise with focusing when using large aperture, slight error will throw your subject out of focus
film are made of light-sensitive silver bromide crystals

sensitivity is determined by the size of the crystals

the bigger the crystals are, the more sensitive the film is to light, and the more visible the grains are
to get the best quality possible, for print over 8 by 10, use slow film (ISO 100 and below)
use high speed film (ISO 800 and above) when shooting in low light or action (sports)
records light
recorded image cannot be seen before processing
a.k.a "negative" because when processed it shows bright as dark and dark as bright
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
f/16
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
+1 EV (stop)
2X light
T H E
EXPOSURE
T R I A N G L E
A LARGE APERTURE PRODUCES SHALLOW DEPTH OF FIELD

A SMALL APERTURE PRODUCES DEEP DEPTH OF FIELD
Full transcript