Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sexual Abuse

No description
by

DeShauna Holmes

on 29 September 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sexual Abuse

Psychosocial Development
Sexual Abuse Through a Child's Eyes
GUILT & SHAME
Accounts, signs, and effects of sexual abuse
Long- Term Effects of
Abuse
Conclusion:
There is Help

RAINN - Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network guide to talking with your child about sexual abuse.

Pick your time and place carefully!
Have this conversation somewhere that your child feels comfortable.
DO NOT ask your child about child abuse in front of the person you think may be abusing the child!
Ask if anyone has been touching them in ways that don’t feel okay or that make them feel uncomfortable.
Know that sexual abuse can feel good to the victim, so asking your child if someone is hurting them may not get the information that you are looking for.
Follow up on whatever made you concerned. If there was something your child said or did that made you concerned, ask about that.
Ask in a nonjudgmental way, and take care to avoid shaming your child as you ask questions.

”I” questions can be very helpful. Rather than beginning your conversation by saying “You (the child) did something/said something that made me worry…” consider starting your inquiry with the word “I.”
For example: “I am concerned because I heard you say that you are not allowed to close the bathroom door.”
Make sure that your child knows that they are not in trouble, and that you are simply trying to gather more information.

Talk with your child about secrets.
Sometimes abusers will tell children that sexual abuse is a secret just between them. They may ask the child to promise to keep it secret.
When you talk to your child, talk about times that it’s okay not to keep a secret, even if they made a promise.

Build a trusting relationship with your child.
Let your child know that it is okay to come to you if someone is making them uncomfortable.
Be sure to follow up on any promises you make—if you tell your child that they can talk to you, be sure to make time for them when they do come to you!

All children should know that it’s okay to say “no” to touches that make them uncomfortable or if someone is touching them in ways that make them uncomfortable and that they should tell a trusted adult as soon as possible.
Let your child know that you won’t get angry at them if they tell someone “no.” Children are often afraid that they will get into trouble if they tell someone not to touch them.

Teach children that some parts of their body are private.
Tell children that if someone tries to touch those private areas or wants to look at them, OR if someone tries to show the child their own private parts, they should tell a trusted adult as soon as possible.
Let children know that they will not be in trouble if they tell you about inappropriate touching.
Make sure to follow through on this if your child does tell you about inappropriate touching! Try not to react with anger towards the child.

These finding are based on a study of 154 sexually abused children compared to 53 demographically similar children not sexually abused.
The Psychological Impact of Childhood Sexual AbuseT
What is Sexual Abuse?
Sexual abuse is unwanted sexual activity, with perpetrators using force, making threats or taking advantage of victims not able to give consent.

American Psychological Association
"There are many forms of childhood sexual abuse. The sexual abuse can involve seduction by a beloved relative or it can be a violent act committed by a stranger. Sexual abuse can be hard to define because of the many different forms it can take on, the
different levels of frequency, the variation of circumstances it can occur within, and the different relationships that it may be associated with." Hall & Hall (2011).
Child Sexual Abuse Statistics

1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse.
Self-report studies show that 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult
males recall a childhood sexual assault or sexual abuse incident.
During a one-year period in the U.S., 16% of youth ages 14 to 17 had been
sexually victimized.
Over the course of their lifetime, 28% of U.S. youth ages 14 to 17 had
been sexually victimized.
Children are most vulnerable to CSA between the ages of 7 and 13.

The Psychological Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse
According to Elliot and Briere (1994) , The primary psychological impacts of sexual abuse are thought to occur in at least three stages:
(1) initial reactions to victimization, involving posttraumatic stress, painful emotions, and cognitive disruptions of normal psychological development, distortions

(2) accommodation to ongoing abuse, involving coping behaviors intended to increase safety and/or decrease pain during victimization

(3) the more long-term consequences, reflecting the impacts of initial reactions and abuse related accommodations on the individual’s ongoing psychological development and personality formation
Elliott, D.M., & Briere J.N. (1994). Immediate and long-term impacts of child sexual abuse.
Future of Children. 4(2
). Retrieved from https://www.princeton.edu/futureofchildren/publications/cs/04_02_02.pdf


Hall, M., & Hall, J. (2011). The long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse: Counseling implications. Retrieved from http://counselingoutfitters.com/vistas/vistas11/Article_19.pdf
Caution: Any child could be a target for sexual abuse
In Erik Erikson's Psychosocial Theory an individual has eight stages of the development. Each of these stages have a particular operation that must be successfully completed for normal development to occur. If the individual doesn't successfully complete the task a crisis occurs. When a child experiences sexual abuse an interference takes place in normal development.
Infant and toddler years
: a child's sense of self, trust in others and ability to self-regulate is affected when their development is infringed by sexual abuse.

Early school years
: the abuse affects the child's awareness of internal psychological processes and of himself/herself in relation to others.

Adolescence
: Sexual abuse invades the adolescent's definition of self in a period that is characterized by increased self-perception and recognition of other's opinions.

Views and Voices of Childhood Sexual Abuse
Professional Perspective
An Investigation of Childhood Sexual Abuse for Parents and Educators
Sexual abuse can have a negative effect on school performance, behavior, and family function.
The findings according to Sleeper, Rose, Paradise, and Nathanson (1994):

The study showed while 52% of the abused children performed at or above grade level they performed worse than the control children in reading, science, and social studies.

The sexually abused children received a higher proportion of unsatisfactory classroom behavior ratings than the control children.

The study was consistent with the findings of other's that problematic family function accompanies disturbances among sexual abused children.


Paradise, J., Rose, L., Sleeper, L., & Nathanson, M. (1994). Behavior, family function, school performance, and predictors of persistent disturbance in sexually abused children.
Pediatrics, 93(3)
, 452-459. Retrieved from http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.easydb.angelo.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=b6821c25-a776-4175-9715-277ba63d438f%40sessionmgr4002&vid=3&hid=4103
"Sexual abuse often is initiated by someone the child loves and trusts, which breaks trust and may result in the child believing that people they love will hurt them (Strean, 1988 as cited in Pearson, 1994)." Hall & Hall (2011).
Childhood sexual abuse can result in a various psychosocial problems and hinder normal social growth.
Introduction to pornography
Manipulation
Internet assault
Some of the ways the perpetrator may exploit a child:
Hall, M., & Hall, J. (2011). The long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse: Counseling implications. Retrieved from http://counselingoutfitters.com/vistas/vistas11/Article_19.pdf
What is wrong with Me?
Is this my fault? I just wish this would stop.
Will someone please help me?
What if no one believes me?
I thought he/she loved me. Why would they do this to me?
Talk with your child if you suspect sexual abuse!!!!
Intervention At Home and School
Sexual Abuse and Statistics
https://www.rainn.org/get-information/types-of-sexual-assault/child-sexual-abuse/if-you-suspect
Find a quiet, private place to talk to the child.

Listen to what is being told to you.

Ask only for information to assess the child's safety.

Reassure the child that he/she has done the right thing by telling you.

Make a clear distinction that the abuse or neglect is not
the child's fault and that he/she is not bad or to blame.

Keep your own feelings under control

Use the child's own vocabulary.

Tell the child you cannot promise not to tell

Tell the child that there is help available.

Tell the truth.

Be specific about what will happen next.

Be supportive

Try to help the child regain control.

Reassure the child that you will do your best to support him/her.
As soon as possible, do write down the date and the actual words used in the disclosure (both the child's and yours). The child's first statements have significant forensic importance.

Report the incident to the Department of Human Services.

Seek out your own support person(s) to help you work through your emotional feelings about the disclosure (if needed), keeping in mind the confidential nature of the information you may be sharing
How School Personnel Should Respond if a Child Discloses Abuse
http://www.ok.gov/health2/documents/School%20Reporting%20Manual%2007.pdf
Hostetter, C., Folaron,G., & Decker, V. (2005). Child Abuse and Neglect: Sexual abuse unit 2. Retrieved from http://www.iupui.edu/~childwel/Sexual/Unit_2/negative.htm
http://www.victimsofcrime.org/media/reporting-on-child-sexual-abuse/child-sexual-abuse-statistics
Graph: http://www.studyblue.com/notes/note/n/psych-final/deck/4881736
Jaagbayani09. (2013, February 17). Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Retrieved from http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEsSFV-1Qx4
Jung, K.E. (2011, April 6). Through a Child's Eyes: The Shame and Guilt of Sexual Abuse. Retrieved from http: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2iJCS6HVy4
Murdock, A. (2010, December 5). Long-term Effects of Child Abuse. Retrieved from http ://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fY1UxaqJd6A


If you suspect a child is being sexually abused or a child discloses their being abused you are obligated to report it.

You can protect the child or possibly save a life.

If you are aware of abuse don't make the child continue to suffer the physical and psychological damage of abuse.

Reporting abuse is a call away 1-800-252-5400

For more information on Child Sexual Abuse go to:


http://www.helpandhope.org/index.html

http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Child_Protection/About_Child_Protective_Services/investigation.asp




References
Elliott, D.M., & Briere J.N. (1994). Immediate and long-term impacts of child sexual abuse.
Future of Children
. 4(2).
Retrieved from https://www.princeton.edu/futureofchildren/publications/cs/04_02_02.pdf
Hall, M., & Hall, J. (2011). The long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse: Counseling implications. Retrieved from
http://counselingoutfitters.com/vistas/vistas11/Article_19.pdf
Hostetter, C., Folaron,G., & Decker, V. (2005). Child Abuse and Neglect: Sexual abuse unit 2. Retrieved from http://
www.iupui.edu/~childwel/Sexual/Unit_2/negative.htm
Jaagbayani09. (2013, February 17). Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Retrieved from http:// www.youtube.com/
watch?v=XEsSFV-1Qx4
Jung, K.E. (2011, April 6). Through a Child's Eyes: The Shame and Guilt of Sexual Abuse. Retrieved from http: //
www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2iJCS6HVy4
Murdock, A. (2010, December 5). Long-term Effects of Child Abuse. Retrieved from http ://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=fY1UxaqJd6A
Paradise, J., Rose, L., Sleeper, L., & Nathanson, M. (1994). Behavior, family function, school performance, and
predictors of persistent disturbance in sexually abused children.
Pediatrics, 93(3)
, 452-459. Retrieved from http://
eds.a.ebscohost.com.easydb.angelo.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=b6821c25-a776-4175-9715-277ba63d438f
%40sessionmgr4002&vid=3&hid=4103
Full transcript