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Shanti and Sarah Aluminum Presentation

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Rose Dawson

on 2 October 2012

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Transcript of Shanti and Sarah Aluminum Presentation

Aluminum
Cans THE ETERNALLY RECYCLABLE Raw Materials Useful Life 1) Cup forming
2) Manufacturing Process and Production Aluminum can be recycled into a lot of different products such as tractor trailer and car bodies, however, aluminum cans usually become new aluminum cans. Recycling aluminum does not reduce the quality of the metal, so it can be recycled indefinitely. With a constant demand for aluminum cans, manufacturers can have an aluminum can back on store shelves as a new can in as little as 60 days of being recycled. Producing new cans from recycled aluminum saves 95% of the energy used to produce cans from ore, known as bauxite. Maine’s aluminum is shipped out of state and used primarily to make new cans. Recyclability Theoretically, aluminum can be recycled indefinitely. However, the aluminum cans will decrease in quality as they are recycled over and over. Therefore, cans are thrown away after a certain period of being recycled because their quality deteriorates so that they are no longer useful. End of Useful Life Energy Costs Ways to Reduce Impact
On Earth Aluminum is a shiny, silvery white colored metal that is light in weight and strong.
The density of aluminum is 2.7 g/mL, which means the metal will sink in water, but is still relatively light, compared to most metals. It has a very low density. Physical Properties Aluminum cans are very popular. Most people buy/use them, because most people drink soda. The aluminum can market is a very large and significant market, especially in the U.S. Trade is quite well from countries who export bauxite, because America's aluminum can industry is so large. Marketing Aluminum can be recycled into a lot of different products such as tractor trailer and car bodies, however, aluminum cans usually become new aluminum cans. Recycling aluminum does not reduce the quality of the metal, so it can be recycled indefinitely. With a constant demand for aluminum cans, manufacturers can have an aluminum can back on store shelves as a new can in as little as 60 days of being recycled. Producing new cans from recycled aluminum saves 95% of the energy used to produce cans from ore, known as bauxite. Maine’s aluminum is shipped out of state and used primarily to make new cans. Packaging for Shipment The raw material of the aluminum beverage can is, of course, aluminum. Aluminum is derived from an ore called bauxite. The aluminum base, for beverage cans consist of about 97% aluminum, but it contains tiny amounts of other metals, too. Typically 1% magnesium, 1% manganese, 0.4% iron, 0.2% silicon, and 0.15% copper. Lots of the aluminum used in cans comes from recycled material. Twenty-five percent of the total American aluminum supply comes from recycled scrap. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_recycling
http://www.newark.com/pdfs/techarticles/cornell/thermalapplet.pdf
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-2/Aluminum-Beverage-Can.html
http://earth911.com/recycling/metal/aluminum-can/
http://www.internationalrivers.org/resources/the-aluminum-can-s-dirty-little-secret-3838
http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/102aluminum.html
http://www.livestrong.com/recycling-aluminum/#ixzz286IInr3W
http://www.livestrong.com/article/215204-pros-cons-of-recycling-aluminum-cans/ Bibliography Discovered in the 1820s, aluminum is the most abundant metal on earth.
Over 50 percent of the aluminum cans produced are recycled.
A used aluminum can is recycled and back on the grocery shelf as a new can, in as little as 60 days. That's closed loop recycling at its finest!
Aluminum is a durable and sustainable metal: two-thirds of the aluminum ever produced is in use today.
Every minute of everyday, an average of 113,204 aluminum cans are recycled.
Making new aluminum cans from used cans takes 95 percent less energy and 20 recycled cans can be made with the energy needed to produce one can using virgin ore.
Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.
Last year 54 billion cans were recycled saving energy equivalent to 15 million barrels of crude oil - America's entire gas consumption for one day.
Tossing away an aluminum can wastes as much energy as pouring out half of that can's volume of gasoline.
In 1972, 24,000 metric tons of aluminum used beverage containers (UBCs) were recycled. In 1998, the amount increased to over 879,000 metric tons.
In 1972, it took about 22 empty, aluminum cans to weigh one pound. Due to advanced technology to use less material and increase durability of aluminum cans, in 2002 it takes about 34 empty aluminum cans to weigh one pound.
The average employee consumes 2.5 beverages a day while at work.
The empty aluminum can is worth about 1 cent.
Americans throw away enough aluminum every three months to rebuild the entire national commercial air fleet.

Fun Facts Aluminum is a sustainable metal and can be recycled over and over again. A can is generally turned into a new can and back on store shelves within 60 days. Cans are usually available through curbside pickup or community drop-off locations nationwide. Recycling aluminum uses about 5% of the energy required to create aluminum from bauxite. So, the energy costs of aluminum are quite low, seeing as much of the aluminum produced is from recycled material. The energy used, and therefore the energy costs, of recycling aluminum are quite low. Energy Costs Only 48% of aluminum cans were recycled in 2011. This was mainly because consumers did not think recycling cans was worth the effort and time it took. If they knew that the wasted energy from throwing away those cans was enough to power 1.8 million homes, they might have acted differently. 1.Cup Forming — The process starts with a coiled aluminum sheet which is fed through a press that punches out shallow cups.
2.Redrawing & Ironing — Cups are fed into an ironing press where successive rings redraw and iron the cup and reduce sidewall thickness to achieve a full-length can. The bottom is domed to obtain strength required to withstand internal pressure.
3.Trimming — Cans are spun as a cutting tool trims the rough shell from the inside.
4.Cleaning — The cans are cleaned and pre-treated for decoration and inside coating.
5.Printing & Varnishing — Cans are rolled against a rubber cylinder to print up to four colors simultaneously, then moved to another station where a clear protective overvarnish is applied.
6.Bottom Varnishing — Cans are moved past an applicator that applies a protective varnish to the bottom.
7.Baking — Cans wind through a conveyor in an oven to dry the printing.
8.Inside Spraying — A specially selected coating is sprayed on the inside of the cans.
9.Baking — Cans are conveyed through a tunnel oven that bakes and cures the inside coating.
10.Necking and Flanging — Cans are necked-in at the top to reduce can diameter and flanged to accept the end.
11.Light Tester — Clean cans are cycled through a light tester that detects pin holes and rejects defective cans.
13.Stamping — Ends are stamped out of pre-coated aluminum coil. Compound is added to assure a perfect seal between can and end at the customer’s plant.
14.Rivet Making, Scoring and Tabbing — Ends are fed through a high precision press where rivet making, scoring and tabbing occur in consecutive operations. Manufacturing Process and Production
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