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Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, And Meteoroids

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Haley Beckel

on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, And Meteoroids

By: Haley Beckel Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, And Meteoroids Where do Asteroids Hang Out? What Are Asteroids Made up of? What do Asteroids Look Like? How do They Impact us? What Type of Path do Asteroids Follow or Take on? Sources Many Asteroids orbit the Sun in circular orbits in the Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter Asteroids can range from various compositions, shapes, and sizes. Believe it or not most asteroids are made up of pieces of other asteroids. They mainly fall into these three categories:

C-type (carbonaceous):
These are considered one the most common types of asteroids. Very dark, composition is considered to be similar to the Sun. C-type asteroids mostly inhabit the main belt's outer regions.

S-type (silicaceous):
Bright, composition is metallic iron mixed with iron and
magnesium-silicates. These asteroids dominate the inner
asteroid belt.

M-type (metallic):
Bright, composition is dominated by metallic iron. These inhabit the main belt's middle region. Most Asteroids look similar to the moon with a white-greyish tone and deep craters. Although, Asteroids come in various shapes and sizes. Asteroids' orbital paths are influenced by the gravitational pull of planets, which cause their paths to change. Therefore, Asteroids' tend to just go with the flow. Websites:
"Frequently Asked Questions." Frequently Asked Questions. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2013.
"ASTRONOMY FOR KIDS." Comets. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2013.
N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2013.
"Solar System Exploration: Planets: Asteroids: Overview." Solar System Exploration: Planets: Asteroids: Overview. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2013.
"Ask an Astronomer for KIDS! - What Is a Comet?" Ask an Astronomer for KIDS! - What Is a Comet? N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.
"What Are an Asteroid, a Meteor and a Meteorite?" LiveScience.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"What Is the Difference between an Asteroid, Comet, Meteoroid, Meteor and Meteorite?" What Is the Difference between an Asteroid, Comet, Meteoroid, Meteor and Meteorite? N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Whatâs the Difference between a Comet, Asteroid, Meteoroid, Meteor & Meteorite?" Whatâs the Difference between a Comet, Asteroid, Meteoroid, Meteor & Meteorite? N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"The Comet's Tale: Orbits." The Comet's Tale: Orbits. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Asteroids, Comets, Meteorites." - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
Pictures:
"StarChild: The Asteroid Belt." StarChild: The Asteroid Belt. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Amazing Astronomy." : Asteroids. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013
"NASA's Cosmos." NASA's Cosmos. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Tikalon Blog by Dev Gualtieri." Tikalon Blog by Dev Gualtieri. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"How Asteroid Belts Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013
"Sudan Hit by Apollo Asteroid | Watts Up With That?" Watts Up With That. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Comets and Asteroids." Comets and Asteroids. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Making Styx." Making Styx. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"ASTRONOMY FOR KIDS." Comets. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2013.
"Ask an Astronomer for KIDS! - What Is a Comet?" Ask an Astronomer for KIDS! - What Is a Comet? N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.
"Russian Meteor Sightings in Outer Space." HD Wallpapers RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Meteoroid by ~sash4all on DeviantART." Meteoroid by ~sash4all on DeviantART. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.
"Origin of Meteorites." Leonids Meteor Shower:. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013. What Are Asteroids? "Asteroids are metallic, rocky bodies without atmospheres that orbit the Sun but are too small to be classified as planets." Studies have shown, "the materials used as the building blocks of life could have been brought to the Earth via asteroid impacts. Hence, studying asteroids is not only essential to study the chemical mixture from which the Earth formed, these asteroids may be the key to finding how the building blocks of life were delivered to the early Earth." Why do Scientists Study Asteroids? C-type Asteroid S-type Asteroid M-type Asteroid http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science-channel/4956-the-planets-asteroids-video.htm How do we Know Their Composition? We know an Asteroid's composition by simply observing them, and further studying them. How Are Asteroids Paths Monitored? "By bouncing transmitted signals off objects, images the information is derived from the echoes, such as the asteroid's orbit, rotation, size, shape, and metal concentration." Why Are They Monitored? Scientists and Astronomers monitor Asteroids whose paths intersect Earth's orbit. These are called Near Earth Objects (NEOs) these Asteroids have a possibility of dangerously impacting Earth. Hence, we must monitor these to identify and prevent future impact hazards. Astronomers are the number one monitors of Asteroid Paths.

Asteroid Paths are monitored not only by optical observations, but also by radar. What is a Comet? A comet is basically a 'dirty snowball' that orbits the Sun. It is called this because of its composition, which is mainly ice, and dust. Who And What Monitor Asteroid Paths? Comets consist of ice, dust, methane, ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, and methane. What is a Comet Made up of? The orbit of a comet follows and elliptical path around the Sun. This means there is a point for each comet where it is closest to the Sun and farthest from the Sun. These two points are called: Perihelion(closest to the Sun), and Aphelion(farthest from the Sun). What Type of Orbit do Comets Follow? "A meteoroid is a body in space which is larger than a grain of dust, but smaller than an asteroid, with meteoroids potentially being roughly boulder-sized." What is a Meteoroid? "A meteor is an asteroid or other object that burns and vaporizes upon entry into the Earth's atmosphere; meteors are commonly known as "shooting stars." What is a Meteor? Meteorites are composed of about 90 percent iron; stony meteorites are made up of oxygen, iron, silicon, magnesium and other elements. What is a Meteorite? How do we Know Their Composition? We know an Comet's composition by simply monitoring them, to observe and further study them same as an Asteroid's. Similarities: Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids Why Do They Hang Out There? Differences: Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids Asteroids, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids do not have a visible coma.(Comets do)
Meteors burn up in Earth's atmosphere.(Meteorites survive)
Asteroids are mainly made of Carbon, Metallic Iron, and Magnesium Silicates.(Comets are not)
Comets are mainly made of Ice and Dust.(Asteroids are not)
A Meteoroid is a small particle of either a Comet, or Asteroid. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids all orbit the Sun.
Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids all be seen from Earth at a point.
They are all smaller than the smallest dwarf planet.
Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, Meteorites, and Meteoroids are all remains of the formation of the solar system.
They all are all without an atmosphere bound by gravity. Asteroid paths that intersect Earth's orbit Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have a possibility of dangerously impacting Earth, severely damaging our Earth, Cities, Countries, and even us. . http://science.time.com/2013/02/14/asteroid-hits-earth-how-the-doomsday-scenario-would-play-out/ Asteroids' orbital paths are influenced by the gravitational pull of planets, which causes their paths to change. http://videos.howstuffworks.com/nasa/3592-the-asteroid-belt-video.htm http://videos.howstuffworks.com/discovery/6558-asteroids-vs-meteorites-video.htm http://videos.howstuffworks.com/discovery/35309-following-the-comet-video.htm
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