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Verbal Irony and Sarcasm

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by

Catherine Waye

on 27 November 2013

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Transcript of Verbal Irony and Sarcasm

Verbal Irony & Sarcasm
Verbal Irony
Essential Terms Packet:
"The opposite of what is said is meant. There is a contrast between surface meaning and actual meaning, between what is and what seems to be, between reality and appearance, between what is and what ought to be" (Coker).
Sarcasm
Essential Terms Packet:
"A form of verbal irony in which apparent praise expresses personal disapproval; intended to hurt; a jeering taunt" (Coker).
Verbal Irony
sarcasm
My Definition: A clever way of insulting something or someone through reverse psychology.
My Definition: A contradiction, saying one thing but meaning another.
Purpose?
Verbal Irony: To emphasize what should be or happen by pointing out that it is the opposite of what is occurring or has occurred.
Sarcasm: To show disapproval or make fun of an idea or concept.

Example: Verbal Irony
"Only Gatsby, the man who gives his name to this book, was exempt from my reaction -- Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have unaffected scorn" (Fitzgerald 2).
(Scheinwerfermann)
Example: Verbal Irony
The title?
"'I'll tell you what justice is. Justice is a knee in the gut from the floor on the chin at night sneaky with a knife brought up down on the magazine of a battleship sandbagged underhanded in the dark without a word of warning. Garroting. That's what justice is...'" (Heller 80).
Example: Verbal Irony
"'"I've had such a hell of a
happy life with the British aristocracy!'""
(Hemingway 207).
Example: Sarcasm
Example: Sarcasm
"'Yes, that's the way it's done in the very best families. Robert's
sending me. He's going to give me two hundred pounds and then I'm going to visit friends. Won't it be lovely? The friends don't know about it, yet.'
She turned to Cohn and smiled at him. He was not smiling now.
'You were only going to give me a hundred pounds, weren't you, Robert? But I made him give me two hundred. He's really very generous. Aren't you, Robert?"' (Hemingway 55).
“She needs to sort out her priorities.”
“That is quite the rap sheet, Prison Mike”

“For God's sake, Sheldon, do I have to... hold up a sarcasm sign every time I open my mouth?”

"You really have got a lid on it, haven't you? What's your secret? Mellow jazz? Bongo drums?"

"Oh, hey, nerdiest old dude I know, you wanna come cook crystal? Please. I’d ask my diaper-wearing granny, but her wheelchair wouldn’t fit in the RV."
Sarcasm in TV & Film
(Baker)
(Willoughby)
("The Convict")
("The Big Bran Hypothesis")
(Columbus)
("Cat's Out of the Bag")
(Whedon)
Works Cited
Amy M. and Suzanne W. Coker. 115 Essential Terms for the Discussion of Language.
Bethesda: Walt Whitman High School, 2002

Scheinwerfermann. Stop Defacing Signs. 2001. Photograph. Wikipedia Web. 26 Nov 2013.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stop_Defacing_Signs.jpg>.

Baker, Lyman A. "Verbal Irony." Critical Concepts . Kansas State University, 30 Nov.
2000. Web. 26 Nov. 2013.

Fitzgerld, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner , 2004. Print.

Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Scribner , 2003. Print.

Heller, Joseph. Catch-22. 50th Anniversary. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011. Print.

Willoughby, Bob. Catch-22. 1969. Photograph. Photographs from the Bob Willoughby
EstateWeb. 26 Nov 2013. <http://www.willoughbyphotos.com/work.html?gallery=nichols

The Great Gatsby. 2013. Photograph. Internet Movie Database. Web. 26 Nov 2013.
<http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3999310592/tt1343092?ref_=ttmi_mi_all_pos_165>.

"The Convict." Prod. Ricky Gervais, and Greg Daniels.The Office. Fox Broadcasting
Company: 30 Nov. 2006. Television.

"The Big Bran Hypothesis ." Dir. Chuck Lorre, and Bill Prady. The Big Bang Theory . CBS:
01 Oct. 2007. Television.

Gilligan, Vince, prod. "Cat's in the Bag." Breaking Bad. AMC: 27 Jan. 2007. Television.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Dir. Chris Columbus. Warner Brothers, 2001.
DVD.

The Avengers. Dir. Joss Whedon. Marvel, 2012. DVD.

Mish, Frederick C. “Irony.” Def. 2a. Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary. Springfield:
Merriam-Webster. 1983. Print.

Mish, Frederick C. “Sarcasm.” Def. 1. Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary. Springfield:
Merriam-Webster. 1983. Print.
Catch-22
The Great Gatsby
The Sun Also Rises
The Sun Also Rises
Dictionary Definition: "The use of words to exprss something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning (Mish).
Dictionary Definition: "A sharp and often satirical or ironic utterance designed to cut or give pain" (Mish).
by Catherine Waye
Full transcript