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Providing Equal Access for Students Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Learning from the Past to See the Future for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students
by

Melissa Bell

on 9 April 2014

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Transcript of Providing Equal Access for Students Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Providing Equal Access
for Students Who are
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Melissa Bell
Outreach Development Specialist
DARS DHHS
Austin
Challenges & Solutions
Interpreters
Advertise
Be competitive
Video Remote Interpreting
Budget
Administration
Students
Others
RESOURCES
Deafness Resource Specialists
DARS/Division for Rehab Services
PEPNet
AHEAD listserv
Each other!
Common Aids and Services
Interpreters
Captioning
Assistive
Listening
Devices
Tutors
Note takers
Open purchase orders
Legal Updates
ADA Title II and Title III Regs
Video remote interpreting (VRI) service means an interpreting service that uses video conference technology over dedicated lines or wireless technology offering high-speed, widebandwidth video connection that delivers high-quality video images as provided in § 35.160(d) and 36.303(f).
(VRI requirements address video and audio quality and user training.)
Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the handler’s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to... alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds...
- A public entity and public accommodation shall not require an individual with a disability to bring another individual to interpret for him or her.
- A public entity and public accommodation shall not rely on an adult accompanying an individual with a disability to interpret or facilitate communication (with two exceptions - see handout).
- A public entity and public accommodation shall not rely on a minor child to interpret or facilitate communication, except in an emergency involving an imminent threat to the safety or welfare of an individual or the public where there is no interpreter available.
Equal Opportunity
Equal Access,
everyone else.
Shortages
Qualifications
Educated and exposed to the needs
Empowered & accountable
Shortages
Cumbersome
paperwork
~Howard Rosenblum,
NAD CEO
'Success'
means having
the same
opportunities as
Hearing Loss Resource Specialists
Wrap-Up
Legal
ARE YOU DOING TOO MUCH?
Video Remote Interpreting (VRI)
28 C.F.R. § 35.104 and 36.104
Auxiliary Aids and Services
28 C.F.R. §35.160(b)(2) and 36.303(c)(1)(ii)
Qualified Interpreter
28 C.F.R. §§ 35.104 and 36.104
Qualified interpreter means an interpreter who, via a video remote interpreting (VRI) service or an on-site appearance, is able to interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively and expressively, using any necessary specialized vocabulary. Qualified interpreters include, for example, sign language interpreters, oral transliterators, and cued-language transliterators.
The type of auxiliary aid or service necessary to ensure effective communication will vary in accordance with the method of communication used by the individual; the nature, length, and complexity of the communication involved; and the context in which the communication is taking place. In determining what types of auxiliary aids and services are necessary, a public entity shall give primary consideration to the requests of individuals with disabilities. In order to be effective, auxiliary aids and services must be provided in accessible formats, in a timely manner, and in such a way as to protect the privacy and independence of the individual with a disability.
Companions
28 C.F.R. § 35.160(a)(1)–(2) and (b)(1) and 36.303(c)(1)(i)

(a)(1) A public entity shall take appropriate steps to ensure that communications with applicants, participants, members of the public, and companions with disabilities are as effective as communications with others.

(a)(2) For purposes of this section, “companion” means a family member, friend, or associate of an individual seeking access to a service, program, or activity of a public entity, who, along with such individual, is an appropriate person with whom the public entity should communicate.

(b)(1) A public entity shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to afford qualified individuals with disabilities, including applicants, participants, companions, and members of the public, an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, a service, program, or activity of a public entity.
SERVICE ANIMALS
28 C.F.R. § 35.104 and 36.104
All
new
All
new
AUXILIARY AIDS AND SERVICES
28 C.F.R. § 35.104 and 36.303
Auxiliary aids and services includes—
(1) Qualified interpreters onsite or through video remote interpreting (VRI) services; notetakers; real-time computer-aided transcription services; written materials; exchange of written notes; telephone handset amplifiers; assistive listening devices; assistive listening systems; telephones compatible with hearing aids; closed caption decoders; open and closed captioning, including real-time captioning; voice, text, and video-based telecommunications products and systems, including text telephones (TTYs), videophones, and captioned telephones, or equally effective telecommunications devices; videotext displays; accessible electronic and information technology; or other effective methods of making aurally delivered information available to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing; …
WHO CAN AND CANNOT INTERPRET
28 C.F.R. § 35.160(c) and 36.303(c)(2-4)
All
new
DARS/Division for Blind Services
AHEAD in Texas conference
April 2014
Welcome
Who's here?
Able to communicate effectively
Qualified!
DEAF STUDENT?
Just get an interpreter, right?!
Ensuring Accessibility:
It's the right thing to do.
It's the legal thing to do.
ADA Basics
Title I - Employment

Title II - State and local governments

Title III - Public accommodations
Other laws
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504
S.B. 1210
Certificate of Deafness for Tuition Waiver
CODTW

DHHS role

Application

S.B. 1210

- Team interpreters
- Online classes
- Video Remote Interpreting
transcription
CART
&
Videos
Online clips
Melissa Bell
DARS DHHS

512-407-3250 v
512-900-5445 vp
melissa.bell@dars.state.tx.us
www.dars.state.tx.us
Doug Dittfurth, MEd
Sign Consulting
Sponsored by PEPNet
Austin
AHEAD in Texas conference
April 2014
Changing Perspectives
Fair Housing Act
21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act
DARS/DBS - Deafblind Services
de
Doug Dittfurth, MEd
Sign Consulting
Sponsored by PEPNet
Austin
de
For questions, compliments, or complaints call the DARS Inquiries Line: 1-800-628-5115 and use the relay option of your choice, if needed.
Full transcript