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Art 8 - Making your Mark

Studio 8 - Line Design
by

Jessica Martinez - Burgalassi

on 13 September 2013

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Transcript of Art 8 - Making your Mark

MAKING YOUR MARK
-
An exploration of mark making and pattern
Wassily Kandinsky
Julie Mehretu
AIM: How do artists use line to create non-objective art?
Notes:
LINE:
As an ELEMENT OF ART, line is an identifiable path created by a point moving in space.
NON-OBJECTIVE
artwork does not represent or
depict a person, place or thing. The content of work
is its color, shape, brushstrokes, size, scale and
process.
How does Kandinsky use line in his
artwork? What types of lines do you see?
What feeling do you get from the lines used in this artwork? Why? Do you think this painting is about anything?
What types of line can you find in this artwork?
Classwork
Draw a non-objective design in
your sketchbook. Fill the entire
page. Use at least 3 different types
of lines and 3 different shapes.
Think about placement. Use
colored pencil to add color.
Closure
1. What is line?
2. What are some ways
Artists use line to create
non-objective works of art?
Look at the images below. Can you guess what emotion each line pattern projects?
DO NOW:
AIM: How does line
convey emotion?
How does Edvard
Munch show emotion
through his use of line?
Do you experience a certain
feeling when you look at
this image?
What makes you feel that
way?
What feeling do you get when you look at this painting? Why?
What emotion does this drawing evoke? Why?
Van Gogh
CLASSWORK
Complete the emotion/line
handout using pencil.
Closure
1. Name three ways line
can portray emotion.
2. Name three types of line and the emotion they can portray.
DO NOW:
Draw a line pattern.
AIM:
How can you use line to create a pattern?
PATTERN
- The repetition of anything created by the use of shape, lines or color.
Notes
FRACTAL
- A geometric pattern that
is repeated at ever smaller scales to
produce irregular shapes and/or surfaces. Every part at every scale of a fractal mirrors the whole.
Which image is a linear pattern?
Which image is a fractal?
What are the differences?
Is this a line pattern or a fractal?
Is this a line pattern or a fractal?
Is this a line pattern or a fractal?
Watch this video about fractals. Sketch in your sketchbook any interesting designs you see.
Watch this clip on creating pattern. Sketch line designs and patterns you find interesting in your sketchbook.
Sample created by Ms. Martinez
NOTES
CLOSURE
1. What is the difference between a line pattern and a fractal?
2. What are the similarities?
1. Take out your supplies.
2. Why do you think you need to plan your artwork? Can you guess what a thumbnail SKETCH is?
DO NOW:
AIM:
How do you create thumbnail sketches to plan your artwork?
CLASSWORK
Fill your thumbnail worksheet with various lines and patterns you will use in your final non-objective artwork. Think about line, pattern and shape.
CLOSURE
1. Why do artists sketch and plan their artwork?
2. How will creating thumbnail designs and sketches help you create your final piece?
AIM:
How will you use marker to accentuate your Non-Objective line design?
AIM:
How can we create emphasis using color?
AIM:
How can you add value to your Non-Objective line design?
AIM:
How can we add to an
already existing line
design?
AIM:
How do we conduct
a class critique?
AIM:
How can you add details
with sharpie marker?
AIM:
How do you know when
you are done with your
layout?
Look at the image below.
What catches your attention first? Explain in a minimum of 3 sentences.
DO NOW:
COMPOSITION
- In the visual arts, a
composition is the placement or arrangement of visual elements in a work of art. It is separate from the subject of a work.
1. Why is composition important in a piece of artwork?
2. Name 3 things to
avoid
when creating a pleasing composition.
CLASSWORK
1. Watch a teacher demonstration.

2.On a 12x17 piece of white paper begin drawing your non-objective design. Reference the composition notes and your thumbnail designs.
NOTES:
Composition Rules for this projects:
1. Create a center of interest.
2. Create directional lines so the viewer's eyes gaze around all elements in the work.
3. Create directional lines entering and exiting the artwork.
AIM:
How will you create a successful composition for your non-objective drawing?
Why is this composition successful?
Kandinsky
CLOSURE
Julie Mehretu
Jackson Pollock
PRINCIPLE OF ART
VALUE
: Value refers to the lightness or darkness of a color.
GRADIENT
: The steady change of one value to another.
NOTES
1. Watch a teacher demonstration on creating value.
2. Create 3 gradients in your sketchbook using various lines and shapes.
3. Continue working on your non-objective design.
CLASSWORK
1. How will you add value to your design?
2. How will the addition of value enhance your design?
CLOSURE
1. Take a step back from your work and look at the design and composition. How is the placement of your design? Does your eye move around your work easily?
2. Continue to work and revise your layout.
CLASSWORK
1. Why is editing your artwork important?
2. Name 1 thing that you like about your artwork.
3. Name 1 thing you will change or add to your artwork.
EXIT CARDS
Finish the layout of your non-objective design.
CLASSWORK
Class Critique
CLOSURE
LINEWEIGHT:
Lineweight is a term that describes the relative "weight" (strength, heaviness, or darkness) of a line.
NOTES:
Start to add sharpie to your design. Think about where you want your dark and light values. Choose your sharpie wisely.
CLASSWORK
1. How will you utilize marker to enhance your design?
2. What is line weight and how did you use it in your design?
3. Why is it important to consider the weight of your lines?
CLOSURE
Continue adding sharpie to your non-objective artwork. Add stippling to at least one part of your design.
CLASSWORK
1. What is stippling?
2. How did you add stippling to your design?
3. What does stippling create?
CLOSURE
Looking at a classmates work of art, fill our the critique worksheet.
We will then discuss your works of art as a class.
Class Critique.

1. Erase all pencil lines from your work.
3. Choose a
focal point
and add one color
emphasis
using colored pencil.
CLASSWORK
1. Why is it important to look at your peers work?
2. Did you find the critiques helpful?
CLOSURE
Do you know
how this
artist created
this painting?
Does that
add to the
"feeling" of
the painting?
What type
of lines
do you
see?
Why would
the artist
use these
types of
lines?
What leads your eye
through the painting?
Are there various
line widths present?
What part catches your attention the most in this painting?
PRINCIPLE OF ART - EMPHASIS:
Emphasis is a principle of art which occurs any time an element of a piece is given dominance by the artist. This element become the FOCAL POINT or CENTER OF INTEREST.
Do Now:List 5 types of
line in your sketchbook.
Look at the images below. Can you guess what emotion each line pattern projects?
Find something in your purse or backpack that has a pattern on it. Draw this pattern and name the object.
DO NOW:
DO NOW:
Create a value gradient
using one type of line.
On an 8.5x11 piece of printer paper, write your name in bubble letters or block letters. Fill the letter of your name with line designs and pattern
HOMEWORK
DO NOW:
Switch artwork with the person next to you and give a 2-minute critique. What is successful about the work in terms of design and composition?
On an 8.5x11 piece of printer paper, write your name in bubble letters or block letters. Fill the letter of your name with texture gradients.
HOMEWORK
On an 8.5x11 piece of printer paper, write your name in bubble letters or block letters. Fill the letter of your name with texture gradients.
HOMEWORK
DO NOW:

Create 3 line designs:
1 using a thin sharpie.
1 using a thick sharpie.
1 using the side of a thick sharpie.
On an 8.5x11 piece of printer paper, write your name in bubble letters or block letters. Fill the letter of your name with texture gradients.
DUE TOMORROW
HOMEWORK
DO NOW:

1. Draw a circle in your sketchbook. Add VALUE to the circle using STIPPLING.
AIM:
How do you know when
you are finished with your non-object line design?
DO NOW:
1. Look at your artwork. What is successful about your work? What will you work on today to finish your piece?
Continue adding sharpie to your non-objective artwork. Add stippling to at least one part of your design.
CLASSWORK
1. Why is it important to critique your own artwork?
2. How did you create a pleasing composition?
CLOSURE
DO NOW:
Analyze the image below.
Describe which parts are emphasized and how.
DO NOW:
Draw a line design in the box provided on your Do Now Sheet. Show emphasis in one part.
Using the IPod template worksheet, create a personalized IPod case. Fill in the ENTIRE case with designs and color.
HOMEWORK
Emphasis
What is
emphasized
in this work by Kandinsky?
Where is your eye drawn first? Why is this a successful
COMPOSITION?
Using the IPod template worksheet, create a personalized IPod case. Fill in the ENTIRE case with designs and color.
HOMEWORK
Using the IPod template worksheet, create a personalized IPod case. Fill in the ENTIRE case with designs and color.
HOMEWORK
DUE FRIDAY
DUE TOMORROW
How does the artists
make your eye move around the work of art?
Make a list of lines
as we say them in your binder.
Binder:
We will be taking notes in this class and often I will ask you to write or sketch in your binder. Notes you should have in your sketchbook will be highlighted in
RED.
Here is and example how you should set up notes for the day. Make sure to put the date so when I grade your binders I will know you took notes for that day.
Date
Notes:
Procedures:
Types of Line:
Monday Feb 4
Homework:
Homework: Supplies dues Friday Feb 8th
Tuesday Feb 5th
Wed Feb 6th
Homework: Supplies due Friday Feb 8th
CLASSWORK
Begin filling in the thumbnail boxes with patterns for your line design artwork.
Friday Sept 14th
Thumbnail Sketch
- Small, quick sketches that record ideas and information for a final work of art.
Notes
Wednesday Feb 6
Reading Path
Kandinsky
What leads your eye
through the painting?
Are there various
line widths present?
What part catches your attention the most in this painting?
Monday Feb 11th
AIM:
How will you create diversity in your artwork?
What makes this a successful composition?
DO NOW:
Thursday Feb 7
1. Continue working on your non-objective design.
2. Use your thumbnail sketches and the pattern packet as inspiration.
CLASSWORK
How have I created diversity in my artwork? How have I created a successful reading path?
1. How have you created diversity in your artwork?
2. How will you create a successful reading path?
CLOSURE
There are many ways to create VALUE.
How do these scales achieve value?
What does the addition of value do to this circle?
Tuesday Feb 12th
Thursday Sept 27th
Wednesday Feb 13th
Identify where has this artist added different line weight. What do you think the variation of line weight adds to the artwork?
Thursday Feb 14th
Using the IPod template worksheet, create a personalized IPod case. Fill in the ENTIRE case with designs and color.
HOMEWORK
DUE FRIDAY
Thursday, Feb 21
1. Why is it important to look at your peers work?
2. Did you find the critiques helpful?
CLOSURE
Friday Feb 22
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