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Romeo & Juliet Unit

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Alan Psalidas

on 5 August 2017

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Transcript of Romeo & Juliet Unit

Romeo and Juliet
Act Three
Act Four
Act Five
Review/Test
Day One:
Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journeyed long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.

But he grew old—
This knight so bold—
And o’er his heart a shadow—
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

And, as his strength
Failed him at length,
He met a pilgrim shadow—
‘Shadow,’ said he,
‘Where can it be—
This land of Eldorado?’

‘Over the Mountains
Of the Moon,
Down the Valley of the Shadow,
Ride, boldly ride,’
The shade replied,—
‘If you seek for Eldorado!’
Analyze Poe's Poem:
What is "El Dorado?"
What is El Dorado in this piece?
What is rhyme scheme?
What is the rhyme scheme of this poem?
What is a stanza?
Why does the rhyme scheme change in the fourth stanza?
Who is the knight?
Who is the Shadow?
What happened to the knight?
History of Shakespeare
Tragedy / Comedy
Iambic Pentameter/ Meter/
Blank Verse
Day Two:
Act Two
Summative One
Act One Events
Scene 1:
All

Scene 2:
First 11 lines
Plot: Benvolio is trying to get Romeo to go to this totally lit Capulet party even though they would be crashing it since they are a Montague.

Scene 3:
lines 96-99
Mother & Daughter relationship
Arranged marriages
House on Mango

Scene 4:
Line 97-end
Fate

Scene 5:
Line 44-end
Sonnet line 93-106
Act Two
Regular:
Texts from the Balcony
Born: 1564 (baptized, no birth record)
Died: 1616
Married: November 28, 1582
Anne Hathaway

Had three children/ one died.

Rumored to have made up to 1700+ new words, some of which we use today.

Potentially gay?

After dying people started to wonder if Shakespeare actually wrote these plays, or if it had been Christopher Marlowe, Edward de Vere, or Francis Bacon.
A play dealing with tragic events and having an unhappy ending, especially one concerning the downfall of the main character.
A drama of light and amusing character and typically with a happy ending
Small Group
Whole
Color masks however you would like. Make sure definitions are in your packet.
Alone
Whole Group in book/ Pairs
Blank Verse:
Poetry written in iambic pentameter that does not rhyme at the end of the line.
Meter:
Measure/unit
Iambic:
Pattern of Unstressed syllable followed by stressed
Iambic Pentameter:
Five Iambic (Pattern of Unstressed syllable followed by stressed) meters per line.
But

soft!

What
light
through

yon
der

win
dow
breaks
?
Unstressed
Stressed
Eldorado
Terms packet
Standards:
9-10.RL.2.1
9-10.RL.3.1

Objectives:
Be able to define tragedy, comedy, iambic pentameter, meter, blank verse, stanza, and rhyme scheme
Construct a stanza with at least one line of iambic pentameter
Standards:
9-10.RL.2.1
9-10.RL.3.2
9-10.RL.4.2
9-10.W.1
9-10.SL.2.1
Objectives:
Identify the difference between Paraphrase and Summarize
Demonstrate understanding of Paraphrase and Summarize
Understand and identify Assonance and Consonance
Produce an example of each of the terms taught so far and a synopsis of the Prologue.
Assonance /Consonance
Prologue
Summarize/ Paraphrase
Summarize:
To pull out main ideas and state in your
own words. This is much shorter than the original piece.
Paraphrase:
To put into your own words line by line.
Assonance:
Vowel sounds that are similar
Consonance:
Consonant sounds that are similar
Whole group
Read Prologue together

Paraphrase/ Summarize

Assonance/Consonance

What is going on here? What is the story telling us?
Group -> Alone/ independent working -> Group again
A Midsummer Night's Dream
Work through Puck's monologue paraphrasing, summarizing, assonance, consonance, rhyme, rhyme scheme, iambic pentamenter (mark stressed and unstressed)
Whole Group/ Doc Camera
Prologue 2.0
Five Parts of a Play
Standards:
9-10.RL.1
9-10.W.1
9-10.W.3.3
9-10.W.4
Objectives:
Students will be able to identify the exposition of a play
Students will be able to understand sonnet rhyme scheme and structure as well as couplet format
Students will create their own couplets (3) that can be revised.
Students will create a 15 sentence portrait that will be used for analysis and revision purposes.
Sonnet
Couplet:
A two line poem, which tells a full story, whose meters are the same and end in a rhyme.

Sonnet:
A poem that consists of 14 lines following the rhyme scheme: a,b,a,b, c,d,c,d, e,f,e,f, g,g- where the last two lines are a couplet which takes what was said in the previous 12 lines and turns it in a completely different direction than what was expected.
Student Portfolios
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Exposition
A comprehensive description or explanation of an idea or theory. (aka. the beginning or a piece of literature)
Honors:
Sonnet
Monologue
Soliloquy
Reflection
Couplets
Examples:
"Love looks not with the eyes, but with the
mind
;
And therefore is winged Cupid painted
blind
." - A Midsummer Night's Dream

"I have the measles and the
mumps
,
a gash, a rash and purple
bumps
." - Shel Silverstein
Class Examples

Solo Practice
Monologue/ Soliloquy
Monologue:
A lengthy dialogue from a character in a play that is given in the presence of at least one other person.

Soliloquy:
A lengthy dialogue that is given by a character, typically revealing a character's thoughts. No other characters are present, so this is an aside.

Aside:
A remark made by a character in a play that is not meant to be heard by any of the characters, but only to the audience.
Scene One:

34-end
Scene Two:
Juliet's Soliloquy/Monologue
Scene Three:
108-158 Friar's Monologue
Scene Four:

Plot: Everyone is sad, so let's get married [Dramatic Irony]
Scene Five:

All (disobedience)
Othello: Homework Honors Only
Work through Iago's soliloquy

Mark:
Paraphrasing,
Summarizing,

Find:
2 Assonance,
2 Consonance,
Rhyme Scheme,
Iambic Pentamenter (mark stressed and unstressed)

HOMEWORK
Kahoot
Act One
Terms:
Dialogue:
Typically in parenthesis or italics, these tell an actor how they are supposed to move across the stage (act/behave)

Stage Directions:
Typically in parenthesis or italics, these tell an actor how they are supposed to move across the stage (act/behave)

Dramatic Irony:
When the audience knows something that is going on in a play that the characters don't.
Read through play together

Place key events on the timeline

Discuss what is going on so far in the play.
Sonnets
Standards:
9-10.RL.3.1 9-10.RL.3.2 9-10.RL.4.1
9-10.RV.2.1 9-10.W.4
Vocab 4 Quiz/
Vocab 5 given
Acuity
Turning Point/ Climax:
a decisive moment that is of maximum intensity or is a major turning point in a plot. AKA "The point of no return."
Figurative Language:
using figures of speech (metaphors, similes, allusions, oxymoron, and pun) to be more effective, persuasive and impactful. Umbrella term.

Oxymoron:

using two words that mean the opposite in order to describe something.

Pun:

a joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word
Blame Game Essay
Write an essay as to who you think is to blame for Romeo and Juliet's death.

Soundtrack Project
Come up with a soundrack to the play explaining your reasonings

FB Twitter Project
Create a FB/Twitter war using modern language as well as quotes to help show what is going on in the book.

DUE AFTER WINTER BREAK!
Sonnets
Pop Sonnets
As a Class "What Do You Mean?"
"I Write Sins Not Tragedies"
In pairs, decode the sonnet and figure out which popular song the sonnet is talking about.

First three pairs with half the sonnet paraphrased and the correct song (title AND band) get candy.
Standards:
9-10.RL.1
9-10.W.1
9-10.W.3.3
9-10.W.4
Work on our Sonnets. This is going to be the only time that we are going to have a dedicated, large chunk of class to work on it before it will be due on December 1st and 2nd.
Objectives:
Students be able to identify key aspects of a sonnet
Understand and be able to create a couplet.
Construct a sonnet so that there will be a rough draft that they can turn in by the end of the hour.
Gallery Walk Questions
Walk around the room and look at the questions on the wall. Write down your thoughts and feelings about each one/ your position on each topic.

DO NOT TALK ABOUT THEM WITH ANYONE ELSE!!!

Class discussion about the topics
20-30 minutes to work on sonnets

Due on December 1/2

Must check in with me before you leave class.
Act One Continued
Objectives:
Understand Dialogue and Stage Directions
Decode what Shakespeare is saying in order to analyze the poem and identify what is being said.
G1 & B1:
Go through Act One and make sure that we get the terms that are present in it. If there is time, have them work on Scene 5.

G3:
Work in small groups (4) and, using table top sticky notes go over what happened in Scene five. Write two paragraphs and also find important quotes that help to identify what is going on. Then put them up on the wall and talk as a class what each of us got.
Monologues
Required:
Pick any topic that you would like to write about.

Ten Syllables per line

Minimum of fourteen lines

Stay on topic
Character Foil:
A character who highly contrasts another in order to highlight certain qualities in the other character.
Comic Relief:
Comic episodes/characters in a dramatic or literary work that offset more serious sections.
Standards:
9-10.RL.1
9-10.RL.2.1
9-10.RL.2.2
9-10.RL.2.3
Objectives:
Compose a graphic that demonstrates what happened in Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet
Understand the events of Act One and prove their understanding in a google quiz.
Compose profiles of characters that are involved in the play, as well as constructing sparknotes on the wall to help us through the play.
Understand that monologue is a lengthy speech and what all is required in a monologue to start thinking about what they would like to write for their monologue.
Finish their sonnet to try and get submitted to Classroom.
Character Analysis
Plot Analysis
Rising Action:
A series of relevant incidents that create suspense, interest and tension in a narrative.
Wall Notecards
Final Sonnet Work Time
This is the last amount of work time that you will have to work on the sonnets. When you have your individual meetings with me, they will be turned in to Classroom, if not done so already.
Act One Quiz

Performance Sign Ups
Act One:
Watch the scene from Romeo + Juliet
End Of Class Activities
9-10.RL.4.1
9-10.W.5
9-10.SL.2.1
9-10.SL.2.2
Writing Prompt
Choice One:
Choice Two:
Write your story or something going on in your life per usual.
What would you do if your parents did not approve of a person that you are with? Would you continue to date them? Would you give in to their wishes and dump the person you were with? Why? Has something like this ever happened to you and how did you respond?
Prologue
Scene One: Skip???
Scene Two: All (movie scene-follow in book)
Scene Three: lines 65-94
Scene Four: Plot: Messenger tells Nurse to tell Juliet to go to confession so that way the Friar can help them elope.
Scene Five: All
Scene 6: All
Standards:
9-10.RL.2.1.
9-10.RL.2.3
9-10.RL.4.1
9-10.W.4
9-10.SL.2.1
Objectives:
Understand the difference between monologue and soliloquy
Be able to write your own monologue/soliloquy
Understand the content from Act 2 in Romeo and Juliet
Look at and understand Extended metaphor.
Regular: Analyze the text and be able to convert key ideas into texting lingo.
Honors: Be able to analyze the text in order to create a wedding itinerary and support using quotes.
HONORS ONLY:
Using Mr. P's short story, separate a paragraph into a stanza which has ONE or more lines of iambic pentameter in it
Regular:
Regular:
Sonnet
Monologue or Soliloquy
Regular:
Start with Prince scene and work our way to the end of the Act. For Scene 5, they will work in assigned groups in order to create a graphic organizer about what happened in the play, choosing at least three quotes to demonstrate what is going on, as well as write a paragraph about the plot.

Honors:
Wedding Itinerary
Using Google Slides, create a wedding invitation and itinerary that sums up what is going on in each scene with one, elegasnt sentence, and a quote used to illustrate your claim. These inviations should be creative as well as informative. We will be printing these off and hanging them up, so make sure that you put time into them!
Honors:
Presentations
Regular:
Comic Strips
Vocab 6
Summative 2
Monologue vs. Soliloquy
Soliloquy is a lengthy piece of verse that talk about a character's internal thoughts, feelings and ideas. It gives us a glimpse at how a character or a musician feels when they are writing the piece.
After each clip, we will put our heads down and give a thumbs up for soliloquy, or a thumbs down for monologue.
Alone
Extended Metaphor:
A comparison between two unlike things that continues throughout a series of sentences in a paragraph or lines in a poem.
Monologues
Required:
Pick any topic that you would like to write about.

Ten Syllables per line

Minimum of fourteen lines

Stay on topic
Honors:
Sign up for group presentations if you haven't already done so and start working with them to figure out how to divvy up the work.
Standards:
9-10.SL.2.1
9-10.SL.4.2
9-10.RL.3.2
9-10.RL.2.2
9-10.RL.2.1
Objectives:
Understand turning point/ climax and its place on the plot map.
Honors: Be able to analyze a scene in a play in order to summarize it, give detailed quotes, and perform the play in key portions that helps aid classmates in understanding what is going on.
Regular: Analyze what is going on in the play and create comic strips in order to explain the action taking part in the portions of the play.
Standards:
9-10.RV.3.3
9-10.RV.3.1
9-10.W.1
9-10.W.4
Objectives:
Understand the terms that are presented to them and use them to create a monologue/soliloquy.
Complete a rough draft of Writing Summative 2 for me to look over and revise before turning in
THE FINAL COPY Dec. 21 & 22
Standards:
9-10.RL.3.1
9-10.W.3.3
9-10.W.4
Objectives:
Analyze plot structure to see how events unfold and why they have to unfold this way.
Work on Act 4 packet to help ensure the ability to analyze/interpret the play in order to get information out of the text.
Finish revision on Written Summative 2 to turn in for next class.
Standards:
9-10.W.3.1
9-10.SL.4.1
9-10.RL.2.2
9-10.RL.2.3
9-10.RL.3.1
9-10.RL.4.2
Objectives:
Understand the denouement of a play and how it wraps up the remainder of the plot lines.
Analyze the events of Act 5 and discuss why Shakespeare wrote the play this way.
Begin reviewing the play by playing the blame game (if found), or otherwise working on either a soundtrack project or a Facebook/ Twitter comment exchange between characters that shows understanding of the play.
Monologue/Soliloquy Work Day
ROUGH DRAFT MUST BE TURNED IN BY END OF CLASS!
With a partner, draw a cellphone screen with text bubbles in it in order to try and sum up in 10 texts (5 from Romeo and 5 from Juliet) what is going on this scene. Feel free to use SCHOOL APPROPRIATE texting lingo and draw emojis in order to express what they are saying.
Terms
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
(Prologue)
Act One
Act Two
Act Three
What is the turning point of the play?
Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.
Create a comic strip that encompasses the main ideas that we have discussed from this act. (At least one square per scene)
Falling Action:
the parts of a story after the climax and before the very end which acts as the "coming to terms" with the fallout from the conflict and is working towards restoring order.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
(Prologue)
Act One
Act Two
Act Three
Falling Action
Act Four
Denouement:
the final part of a play, movie, or narrative in which the strands of the plot are drawn together and matters are explained or resolved.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
(Prologue)
Act One
Act Two
Act Three
Falling Action
Act Four
Denouement
Act Five
Act Four Packet
Work Time for Monologue/Soliloquy
Also: Character foil revisited.
Work on the packet that helps guide us through Act 4 as well as figure out how to interpret the play for ourselves.
DUE NEXT CLASS!!!!
Honors:
Monologue
Soliloquy
AND Reflection
Regular:
Monologue
OR
Soliloquy
Act Five
Scene One:
1-34 Romeo: Fate vs. Free will
Scene Two:
Plot: Communications broke down between friars communicating with Romeo.
Scene Three:
Paris goes to pay respects to Juliet's grave and Romeo, being upset, kills him.
74-120
148-170
210-212
305-310
Test
Finish and Share review projects so that the rest of the class can see the different interpretations of what is going on in the play.
Last Call
Anything that we may have missed that you want to talk about or go over, especially if it doesn't make sense before we go on to the Review Projects.
Review Projects
Monologue vs. Soliloquy
Soliloquy is a lengthy piece of verse that talk about a character's internal thoughts, feelings and ideas. It gives us a glimpse at how a character or a musician feels when they are writing the piece.
After each clip, we will put our heads down and give a thumbs up for soliloquy, or a thumbs down for monologue.
Alone
Writing Prompt
Write either:
A eulogy you would want your friend to give at your death.
A eulogy to a part of yourself that you dislike and want to disappear.
An acceptance speech for an award of some kind.
A eulogy for Romeo and Juliet.
Things to Revise for Future Years
Actually reading and decoding Shakespeare
have them take lines from the NFS and have them match it up to the original text
talk about Thou and doth and art, etc.
Make sure all work is in.

Pick a leaf, color it/ make designs on it however you want (school appropriate), and then hang it on the wall
Full transcript