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Lack of child education in India

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Habiba Yousef

on 3 March 2014

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Transcript of Lack of child education in India

Today, education remains an inaccessible right for millions of children around the world. More than 72 million children of primary education age are not in school and 759 million adults are illiterate and do not have the awareness necessary to improve both their living conditions and those of their children.
$1.25
Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Children's Right
Where ?
What ?
Why ?
Why ?
Why ?
Solutions
For many children who still do not have access to education, it is notably because of persisting inequality and marginalization. In India, children do not have access to basic education because of inequalities that originate in sex, health and cultural identity (ethnic origin, language, religion).
These children find themselves on the margins of the education system and do not benefit from learning that is vital to their intellectual and social development.
Universal primary education is a major issue and a sizable problem for many states. Many emerging countries do not appropriate the financial resources necessary to create schools, provide schooling materials, nor recruit and train teachers. Funds pledged by the international community are generally not sufficient enough to allow countries to establish an education system for all children. Equally, a lack of financial resources has an effect on the quality of teaching. Teachers do not benefit from basic teacher training and schools, of which there are not enough, have oversized classes.
Today, it is girls who have the least access to education. They make up more than 54% of the non-schooled population in the world. This problem occurs most frequently in Arab States, in central Asia and in Southern and Western Asia and is principally explained by the cultural and traditional privileged treatment given to males. Girls are destined to work in the family home, whereas boys are entitled to receive an education.
Considering 136 people over next 10 yrs., India shall constitute 25% of total workforce Today, 25% of total population in India is uneducated Being the largest populated country, challenge is to create the largest pool of skilled and trained human resources.
• Take more of country’s Budget funds for the development of education.

• Encourage children to education to become teachers in the future.

• Increase teachers' salaries and give them more opportunities.

• Reduce fees on for students in schools.

• Increase the income of the families of the material to give them opportunities for their children's education.

Marginalization and poverty
Financial deficit of developing countries
Inequality between girls and boys
in INDIA
Lack of Child Education in India
Education must be accessible to all children. Education is a human right which ought to be accessible to everyone, without any discrimination. All children must be able to go to school, and thereby benefit from the same opportunities to build a future. Additionally, educational instruction must be equally gratuitous so that children from disadvantaged environments will be able to enjoy their right to an education.
Earlier this year, the independent Annual Status of Education Report into rural schools found declining levels of achievement, with more than half of children in standard five – aged around 10 – unable to read a standard two-level text. "If you want to end child labour, you have to fix the education system," Taneja says. "People are aware of what education is and what it is not."
From The Article
It is girls, and marginalised groups such as the very poor and the disabled, who are often left behind. While girls attend primary school in roughly equal numbers to boys, the gap widens as they get older and more are forced to drop out to help with work at home or get married.
Nor do policymakers have a personal stake: the political classes don't tend to send their children to government schools. "It seems to me we can afford everything else," Taneja notes.
http://www.theguardian.com/education/2013/mar/11/indian-children-education-opportunities
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