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Imperial Coinage - Term 1 Project

By: Danielle and Jessica Sauve
by

Jessica Sauve

on 28 October 2012

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Transcript of Imperial Coinage - Term 1 Project

Imperial Coinage By: Danielle and
Jessica Sauve Hadrian was a Roman Emperor.
He was a lover of Greek culture who extensively toured the provinces.
Hadrian succeeded Trajan, his father-in-law. Hadrian - Who was he? “The details of Hadrian's succession are indeed mysterious. Trajan might well have decided on his deathbed to make Hadrian his heir.
But the sequence of events does indeed seem suspicious. Trajan died the 8 August AD 117, on the 9th it was announced at Antioch that he had adopted Hadrian. But only by the 11th was it made public that Trajan was dead." Hadrian - How did he become emperor? He reigned from August 10, 117 – July 10, 138. Therefore, he reigned for 21 years.

He lived to be 62 years old.
Birth: January 24, 76 AD
Death: July 10, 138 AD Hadrian - For how long did he reign? Denomination: Gold Aureus - worth 25 silver denarii
Emperor's Portrait: Profile of Hadrian with a beard
Message to Subjects: Hadrian may have worn a beard for cosmetic reasons and to establish an association with Greek intellectuals.
Obverse Side: Head of Hadrian
Reverse Side: A veiled and draped Hadrian (looking like a priest) is standing on the right, facing left, and sacrificing before an altar or a tripod with a patera (a knobbed, sacrificial plate) in his right hand. On the left an attendant is leading a bull and holding a hatchet. A soldier with a spear, a flutist, and a young boy are all approaching the altar from the left.
Why Image chosen: to depict him as a god-like figure
English Translation: Hadrianvs = Hadrian; Avgcoslllpp = Augustus (“revered one") consul 3 people; yota = 10th letter of the Greek alphabet; pvblica = public Coin #1 Denomination: Gold Aureus - worth 25 silver denarii
Emperor's Portrait: Profile of Hadrian with a beard, wreath and ribbon on his head
Message to Subjects: Hadrian may have worn a beard for cosmetic reasons and to establish an association with Greek intellectuals. Emperors sometimes wore a wreath and ribbon on their head as a token of their own divinity.
Obverse Side: Laureate bust of Hadrian
Reverse Side: Hadrian on horseback riding to the right; his right hand is raised.
Why Image chosen: to depict him as a god-like figure or a deified hero
English Translation: Hadrianvs = Hadrian; Avgvstvs = Augustus (“revered one"); cos = consul; lll = 3 Coin #2 Facts about Hadrian 1. After his father died, he was sent to Rome to study Greek language, literature, and culture, which made him such a Hellenist (a Greek expert) that he became known as the “Greekling.”

2. He was supposed to enter into the military service; but, instead, he spent his time hunting, which was his passion.

3. He studied literature and art as well as music architecture, astronomy, mathematics, law, and military science. Hadrian is unique, because very few rulers received appropriate education. Facts about Hadrian 4. When Hadrian was elected consul in 108 AD, he wrote Trajan’s speeches for him.

5. At the age of 42, he became emperor after Trajan died. Trajan adopted Hadrian as his son so that he could become the next emperor.

6. Hadrian commanded the largest Roman army at the time of Trajan’s death.

7. He traveled so much, that in 128 AD, he assumed the title pater patride, which means “father of the homeland." Names of Close Relations:

Father – Publius Aelius Hadrianus Afer

Mother – Domitia Paulina

Wife – Consort to Vibia Sabina

Children – none, but he adopted Lucius Aelius and Antoninus Pius More about Hadrian Denomination: Gold Aureus - worth 25 silver denarii
Emperor's Portrait: Profile of Hadrian with a beard
Message to Subjects: Hadrian may have worn a beard for cosmetic reasons and to establish an association with Greek intellectuals.
Obverse Side: Head of Hadrian
Reverse Side: Genius stands, draped about his waist, with his head turned to the left, he holds a cornucopia in his left hand and a patera (sacrificial, knobbed plate) over flaming altar in his right.
Why Image chosen: to reflect philosophy of “Four Rulers, but One Empire"
English Translation: Hadrianvs = Hadrian; Avgconlllpp = Augustus (“revered one") consul 3 people; Geniopr = “to the genius of the Roman people" Coin #3 The Five Good Emperors were Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. A political philosopher, Niccolo Machiavelli, gave them this name in 1503 as a result of their good government. Additionally, this title was given to these emperors due to the respect given to them by the people of Rome. Even More Info about Hadrian Denomination: Gold Aureus - worth 25 silver denarii
Emperor's Portrait: Profile of Hadrian with a beard, wreath and ribbon on his head
Message to Subjects: Hadrian may have worn a beard for cosmetic reasons and to establish an association with Greek intellectuals. Emperors sometimes wore a wreath and a ribbon on their head as a token of their own divinity.
Obverse Side: Laureate bust of Hadrian
Reverse Side: Jupiter standing with a staff
Why Image chosen: to honor Jupiter or the sun god Sol
English Translation: impcaesartrajan = emperor Caesar Trajan (Hadrian's father); Hadrianvsavg = Hadrian Augustus (“revered one") Coin #4 Hadrian became sick when he returned home to Rome from one of his journeys. His illness affected the mind and disposition of Hadrian; consequently, he became a cruel tyrant. Additionally, he even tried and failed several suicide attempts! Hadrian 1. Rodgers, Nigel. Roman Empire. New York: Metro Books, 2008.

2. Magill, Frank N., ed. The Ancient World. Pasadena: Salem Press, 1988.

3. Hill, Duncan. Ancient Rome. Bath: Parragon Books Ltd., 2007.

4. McCarthy, Nick. Rome. New York: Rosen Publishing Group Inc., 2008.

5. DiMaio, Michael and Richard Weigel. An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families. 17 May 2006. Collegium Editorum. 20 October 2012. <http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm>. Bibliography Hadrian expanded the alimenta, Trajan's welfare program for the poor.
Moreover, he made an effort to visit many imperial territories himself. Here, he personally inspected the provincial governments.
These journeys began with his visit to Gaul in AD 121 and ended ten years later when he returned to Rome in AD 133-134.
No other emperor saw this much of his own empire! Hadrian Hadrian's last few days alive were austere, for he became even more ill and spent extended periods in severe distress. “As he sought to end his life with either a blade or poison, his servants grew ever more vigilant to keep such items from his grasp. At one point he even convinced a barbarian servant by name of Mastor to kill him. But at the last moment, Mastor failed to obey."
Hadrian left the government to Antonious Pius - his successor. Hadrian died soon afterwards at Baiae on 10 July AD 138. Hadrian's Death Coin #5 Denomination: Silver Tetradrachm - worth 4 Greek drachmae
Emperor's Portrait: Profile of Hadrian with a beard, wreath and ribbon on his head
Message to Subjects: Hadrian may have worn a beard for cosmetic reasons and to establish an association with Greek intellectuals. Emperors sometimes wore a wreath and a ribbon on their head as a token of their own divinity.
Obverse Side: Head of Hadrian
Reverse Side: Seated Roma wearing a helmet and holding a Victory
Why Image chosen: Roma was a deity that symbolized Rome
English Translation: Hadrianvs = Hadrian; Avgvstvspp Augustus (“revered one") people; cos = consul; lll = 3 8. Since there was no natural boundary to the north, Hadrian’s wall was constructed. This man-made fortification served as a 23-mile road that helped the defense of the empire.

9. The Pantheon in Rome was commissioned by Hadrian. It was built in imitation of the tomb built for Augustus.

10. Hadrian’s Temple, known today as one of the Seven Wonders Of The World, was commissioned by Hadrian when he arrived 124 AD in Ephesus, in what is now Turkey. Facts about Hadrian Coin #1: Obverse Coin #1: Reverse Coin #2: Obverse Coin #2: Reverse Coin #3: Obverse Coin #3: Reverse Coin #4: Obverse Coin #4: Reverse Coin #5: Reverse Coin #5: Obverse Hadrian 6. Alchin, Linda. Roman Emperors. 20 October 2012. <http://www.roman-colosseum.info/index.htm>.

7. “Roman Emperors.” Encyclopedia of World Biography. 2004. Encyclopedia.com. 12 October 2012. Walpole High School Media Center. <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

8. Crane, Gregory R. Art and Archaeology Artifact Browser. Perseus Digital Library. 11 July 2012. Tufts University. 20 October 2012. <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/artifactBrowser?object=Coin>. Bibliography
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