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An Introduction to Game Engines

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by

Robert Maddison

on 8 January 2015

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Transcript of An Introduction to Game Engines

what do i
need
to make a game?
genre
programming language
game engine
platform
concept
artwork
sound
2d & 3d graphics
and more..
action

adventure

sports

racing

simulation..
more
pc
windows mac linux
mobile
android ios windows phone..
console
play station xbox wii..
introduction to game engines
game engine
A game engine is a software framework designed for the creation and development of video games.
1994
unreal 1
2014
Half-Life 2 recreature (with unreal 4.0)
2012
Blade & Soul
primary function
rendering engine
integrated development environment (IDE)
physics engine
developer
epic games
ide
unreal editor
engine
unreal engine (1994~ )
language
C++, C#, java..
developer
ide
engine
language
unity technology.
unity (2005 ~)
unity
C#, java script..
2013
pokopang
2012
touch fighter
example of HDRR
2014
deadcore
An integrated development environment (IDE) is a programming environment that has been packaged as an application program, typically consisting of a code editor, a compiler, a debugger, and a graphical user interface (GUI) builder.
is a software component that takes marked up content (such as HTML, XML, image files, etc.) and formatting information (such as CSS, XSL, etc.) and displays the formatted content on the screen
HDRR Rendering
High-dynamic-range rendering (HDRR or HDR rendering), also known as high-dynamic-range lighting, is the rendering of computer graphics scenes by using lighting calculations done in a larger dynamic range. This allows preservation of details that may be lost due to limiting contrast ratios. Video games and computer-generated movies and special effects benefit from this as it creates more realistic scenes than with the more simplistic lighting models used.
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