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The Rebel's Handbook

By: Owain Davies, Chris Bunker, Chelsi Lee begin_of_the_skype_highlighting     end_of_the_skype_highlighting, Kyle Moore
by

Owain Davies

on 26 April 2010

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Transcript of The Rebel's Handbook

The Rebel's Handbook Do you want to start a rebellion? By: Owain Davies, Chris Bunker, Kyle Moore, and Chelsi Lee Then keep readin'!
Here, you will obtain general concepts in successfully completing a rebellion!
You don't believe us? We'll give you specific examples from South African Apartheid and how rebels brought an end to what they didn't believe was right/fair. Step 1:
General Concept:
Seek other people who agree with what you believe in; agree with the rebellion
For example: In South African Apartheid, those who were discriminated racially joined the ANC's series of protests and boycotts because they believed that mass campaigns against the government would be the only solution. This helped make the racial discriminated unable to handle for the authorities at the time. However, not everyone was allowed to join the ANC.
Step 2: General Concept:
Seek an educated leader with the "qualities" who would devote his/her life to the rebellion.
For example:
In the 1940's Mandela gave most of his time to the ANC, neglecting his wife and family and leading to a divorce. Then, in the 1960's Nelson Mandela met secretly with foreign reporters, and he rejected non-violence against a government that does not listen. He knew this would lead to prison. Then, in 1964, Mandela was arrested and put on trial, and he announced at that time he was ready to die for his cause. This gained him respect and supporters whilst he was in prison. These supporters campaigned against apartheid for mandela whilst he was in prison.

For example: In the 1940s, Walter Sisulu knew that Nelson Mandela had the qualities that the Black South Africans needed to get a hold of their freedom and new constitution. Step 3: General Concept:
Have a plan: What do you want changed? What will the rebellion turn into? What is the belief?
For example: 1955 - The ANC writes a 'Freedom Charter' stating that South Africa belongs to all people living within it regardless of race, that all South Africans should be treated equally before the law, and that the country's wealth should be distributed equitably. The charter is being discussed at the 'Congress of the People' held near Soweto on 25-26 June when police surround the meeting, announce that they suspect treason is being committed and take the names and addresses of all those present.
For example:
Biko worked with the Black Consiousness Movement in organizing boycotts, marches, and protests. Step 4: General Concept:
Advertise, what will be changed, what people can get from the rebellion. Let others know how they will be benefited. Make a symbol for others to know whether something is from your "group".
For example: 1955 - After the ANC's freedom charter was written, it was plotted all around South Africa. For instance, light-posts.
For example: The ANC formed a logo to let others know when something is organized by the ANC, and to advertise the agency. Step 5: General Concept:
Boycott, Protest, make others aware of it. Try to avoid violence.
For example: Leaders of the ANC proposed that white authority could only be overthrown through mass campaigns. In 1950 South Africa saw the launch of a series of strikes, boycotts and civil disobedience actions that led to occasionally violent clashes with the authorities. This helped make South African unable to handle. Biko worked with the Black Consiousness Movement in organizing boycotts, marches, and protests.
Step 7: General Concept:
If violence is used against you, spread awareness, take pictures
For example:
* The events in Shapeville led to photographs of dead bodies and awareness across the world. It got the UN and other foreign investors to stop buying South African goods and selling their goods. The UN security council asked South Africa to abandon apartheid. It condemned the shootings. This forced sanctions against South Africa. After British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan ended a tour in South Africa, he told MPs that the British Government did not approve of aparthied and warned them that they could not ignore black demands.
For example: Between Apartheid in 1946-1980, the United Nations passed 158 resolutions concerning South Africa. On many occasions, the UN condemned apartheid, as in 1960, after Sharpeville.
Step 9: General Concept:
Include everyone in the change!
For example:
1994 - The ANC wins the country's first all-race elections. On May 9th, the National Assembly elects Mandela president. De Klerk is elected one of two deputy presidents. The ministry of the new government includes blacks, whites, Afrikaners, Indians, coloureds, Muslims, Christians, communists, liberals and conservatives.
For example:
Nelson Mandela has an white Afrikaner as an assistent.
Step 10: General Concept Work together to an argeement with opposing leaders
For example: In the end the government couldn't take any more of the struggle (due to isolation of sport and economic sanctions), so they offered Mandela a release if he would in favour stop the anti-apartheid campaigners. Mandela did not accept this offer, he said he will not leave prison unless apartheid is stopped. Eventually the government agreed, Mandela was released (after 27 years of imprisonment), and this was the beginning of the ending of apartheid. Soon after he was released Blacks gained the right to vote, Mandela was elected president, he could then put blacks rights into use let black and white people in South Africa live together in harmony.
For example: CODESA- On 26 September 1992 the government and the ANC agreed on a Record of Understanding. This deal with a constitutional assembly, an interim government, political prisoners, hostels and dangerous weapons and mass action and restarted the negotiation process after the failure of CODESA which was a convention of demomatic of South Africa. Mandela accused De Klerk's government of complicity in the attack and the ANC from the negotiations leading to the end of CODESA. From these events that happened the learning is that to enter a rebilion you need to find a solution that they both argee on.
The record of understanding between Mandela and De Klerk included:
1. An elected assembly would draft a new constitution
2. They would set up an interim government
3. An independent group would study police actions
4. Hostels would be fenced in, to protect inmates.
5. Zulu 'traditional weapons' would be banned at rallies.

Step 6:
General Concept:
Get help from bordering countries, have allies with other countries, especially the ones involved with the funding of apartheid.
For example: 1962 - In January Mandela leaves South Africa illegally to attend a freedom conference in Algeria and to scout for military training facilities for Umkhonto members and raise funds from African states.
For example: In 1978 and 1983 the United Nations condemned South Africa at the World Conference Against Racism, and a significant divestment movement started, pressuring investors to disinvest from South African companies or companies that did business with South Africa.

After much debate, by the late 1980s the United States, the United Kingdom, and 23 other nations had passed laws placing various trade sanctions on South Africa.[69] A divestment movement in many countries was similarly widespread, with individual cities and provinces around the world implementing various laws and local regulations forbidding registered corporations under their jurisdiction from doing business with South African firms, factories, or banks.
For example:
Nelson Mandela in prison urged the government to admit that he could no longer take any more of the struggle (due to isolation of sport and economic sanctions), so they offered Mandela a release if he would in favour stop the anti-apartheid campaigners. Mandela did not accept this offer, he said he will not leave prison unless apartheid is stopped. Eventually the government agreed, Mandela was released (after 27 years of imprisonment), and this was the beginning of the ending of apartheid. Soon after he was released Blacks gained the right to vote, Mandela was elected president, he could then put blacks rights into use let black and white people in South Africa live together in harmony.
Step 8: General Concept:
Have a well-known respected religious man his people and people internationally. Partically one who believes in the same religion the majority of the population believed in.
Desmond Tutu has established himself as a very spiritual Church leader, a distinguished peace activist, a compassionate man of the people, an individual highly respected by international political leaders, and a passionate orator. He has been around to multiple countries at the time of apartheid.
For example: Tutu was appointed dean of St Mary's Cathedral in Johannesburg, the first black to hold the position. He emerged as an eloquent spokesperson for the anti-apartheid movement and begins to attract world attention.
For example: Desmond Tutu has formulated his objective as "a democratic and just society without racial divisions", and has set forward the following points as minimum demands:
1. equal civil rights for all
2. the abolition of South Africa's passport laws
3. a common system of education
4. the cessation of forced deportation from South Africa to the so-called "homelands". In the 1980s Archbishop Desmond Tutu became South Africa's most well-known opponent of apartheid,"One day", said Tutu, "I was standing in the street with my mother when a white man in a priest's clothing walked past. As he passed us he took off his hat to my mother. I couldn't believe my eyes -- a white man who greeted a black working class woman!" He used his religious power because he felt that he had it. Although it wasnt in his nature to get involved alothough he did. From this event you should learn that having a high status relgious person within your group can get the attention of many people with the same people and the population will grow within' your group.
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