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Creating a Missional Discipleship Culture in a Salvation Army Context

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Chris Baldwin

on 8 February 2016

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Transcript of Creating a Missional Discipleship Culture in a Salvation Army Context

Creating a Missional Discipleship Culture in Salvation Army Context
Part 1- What is the Vision?
Part 2 - A Missional Discipleship Journey
Some Questions:
What is the church? What is it for? How is it effective?
What makes the Army, "The Salvation Army"?
What is discipleship? How do we disciple people in the 21st century?
How do we structure a corps so that discipleship and mission are at the heart of all we do?
How?
The Model was inherited from Jesus
Maps don't work when the terrain shifts around
Maps don't work when the terrain shifts around
So what is our
?
"Values are internal priorities that express themselves consistently in concrete actions."
Everyone Has Values!
The question is not
"Do you have values?"
but rather
"What do you value?"
Some Important facts about values
Stated Values are often not the real values
Do what you
Value
what you Do
Jesus Said:
Love the Lord your God
Love your neighbour
with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it:
as yourself.
(Matthew 22:37-39)
Expressed through:
-Worship
-Discipleship
Expressed through:
-Relationships
-Mission
Not by asking!
How do you discern the real values?
Observe where people place their money, time and energy
Layers of Life
Practices
Priorities
Values
Principles
God
"These are our traditions"
"We always do it this way"
"This is what I believe"
"This is the Truth"
React
A
lways Keeping Jesus Central
B
ecoming More Like Him
C
reating True Community
Worship
Discipleship
Relationships
Mission
Missional Values
D
oing God's Will
Everyone... ...a worshipper ...praying ...filled with the Holy Spirit
Everyone... ...practicing disciplines ...growing more mature ...discovering their gifts
Everyone... ...building up others ...loving sacrificially ...spending time with others
Everyone... ...involved ...serving ...witnessing
William A Beckham
The question is not
"Do you have values?"
but rather
"What do you value?"
"We highly value prayer"
"Evangelism is a key value"
"We believe that young people are our future"
Your real values are what you actually do
"Fair trade is really important"
Our
compass
is
Values
our
Jesus said:
"For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also."
(Matthew 6:21)
Observe where people place their money, time and energy
The Key Block: Cell Groups
What is the purpose of a Cell?
To Love God
To Love One Another
To Love the Lost World
To Love God
To Love One Another
To Love the Lost World
The Cell Meeting
is Not the Cell
The Weekly Cell Meeting
Serves the daily lives of the members
The Cell Meeting
The Cell Community
People from Cell Community are absorbed into the Cell Meeting
The Cell Community
The Cell multiplies when it gets too big
4 Dimensions of a Cell Group
Upward
Inw
Outward
Forward
Dimension 1 - Upward
Dimension 2 - Inward
Dimension 4 - Forward
Dimension 3 - Outward
Loving God
Keeping Jesus Central
Dynamic Spiritual Experience
Prayer
Worship
Plugging in to God's Power
Loving One Another
Five Cell Stages
Building Community
Honesty
Sacrificial Love
Becoming Family
Forming
Storming
Norming
Performing
Reforming
Loving the Lost
Demonstrating Love
Outreach Strategy
Praying for the Lost
Social Events
Harvest Events
Alpha
Social Action
Balancing Broken
Praying for Healing
Providing for Needs
Being Available
Sharing the Vision
Developing Leaders
Multiplication
Your values
Yourself
Your ministry
Your group
Cell Leaders
Assistants
Mentoring
Involvements
Is a Cell group just a fancy name for a house group?
Bible Study
Bible Study
Only 1 Dimension
Upward
Loving God
Fellowship Group
Fellowship Group
Only 2 Dimensions
Upward
and Inward
Loving God and Each other
Cell Group
Cell Group
All 4 Dimensions!
Upward, Inward,
Outward and Forward
Loving God, Loving One Another, Loving the Lost
Better...
Can become cliquey
No sense of mission
Still meeting focused
Its a meeting
Little relationships
No sense of mission
Builds knowledge not necessarily values
Holistic small group
Values focused
Many different expressions
Same DNA!
Different settings have different strengths
Large Groups
Emphasises the Greatness of God
Good for
Corporate Worship
Biblical Teaching
Mission Strategy
Small Groups
Emphasises the Intimacy of God
Good for
Prayer and Accountability
Honest Sharing
Mutual Ministry
The Flow of a Cell Meeting
The 4 'W's
Witness
The Icebreaker
Purpose:
To break the ice
Value:
Relationships
C
reating True Community
Purpose:
To connect us to God
Value:
Worship
A
lways Keeping Jesus Central
Devotion
Activities:
Refreshments and chit-chat
An Icebreaker activity
Activities:
Prayer and Reflective worship
No singing!
Activities:
Applying Scripture to everyday life
Sharing, Prayer and Ministry
Edification
Sharing the Vision
Activities:
Praying for each others friends
Planning socials and outreach activities
Purpose:
To apply Scripture to
everyday life
Value:
Discipleship
B
ecoming More Like Him
Purpose:
To facilitate mission
and focus outward
Value:
Mission
D
oing God's Will
The Timing of a Cell Meeting
A typical cell meeting would last about 90 minutes
The Timing of a Cell Meeting
Comfort level and spiritual temperature
The Purpose of the Cell Meeting
3 Levels of Spiritual Maturity
1 John 2:12-14
'Children'
'Young Men'
'Fathers'
The Vision
Jesus used all three!
Part 3 - Structuring for Missional Discipleship
You do, I watch
I do, you watch
I do, you help
You do, I help
Disciples had
High
skill,
High
will
Disciples had
Low
skill,
High
will
Disciples had
Low
skill,
Low
will
Disciples had
High
skill,
Low
will
Jesus Delegated
Jesus Directed
Jesus Supported
Jesus Coached
public space**
( > 3m )
Proxemics
(Edward T Hall 1963)
.
A place for intimate relationships
"The search to belong" - Joseph R Meyers
The study of how physical spaces in human interaction effect communication and culture
In all four spaces we connect, we commit and participate and we find significance.

We need to belong in each space:
- Intimate
- Personal
- Social
- Public
Here we share "naked" and vulnerable experiences
Here we share "private" information and experiences
Here we share the "community conversation" and "small talk".
Here we share connectedness and share a common experience
- Public (1)
- Public (2)
Here there is no sense of connection or belonging at all
"The 3"
"The 12"
"The 72"
"The 120"
Basic Building Blocks for missional discipleship
"3"
"12"
Cell Groups
"72"
"120"
Intimate Space
Personal Space
The 4 Building Blocks of a Missional Church
Mentoring

Cell Groups

Missional Communities

Corporate Church
Intimate Space
Personal Space
Social Space
Public Space
Discipleship Block
Focus
Challenge, accountability, vulnerability
Personal sharing, life application, support, closeness.
Small Groups
Large Groups
Missional outreach, social fellowship, training, adaptability.
Celebration, inspiration, teaching, DNA
Old Testament
New Testament
Jeremiah / Barach
Family
Tribe
Clan
The church that meets in the house of...
Paul / Silas
Moses / Joshua
Elijah / Elisha
Peter James John
The church in Pillippi / Corinth / Ephesus etc
"Oikos"
Synagogue
Sunday-Focused
Church
"House"
Church
A Balanced Church
Paul / Timothy
So what does
Value?
Worship
Relationships
Discipleship
Mission
Key
We need to instill these
Values
into the life and ministry of our people
A B C D
A B C D
So what can we learn
from Jesus' discipleship model?
The
The
aim
The
The
The
of discipleship
of discipleship
directions
Serving
Learning
Ways of learning
1. HEAD - Classroom
2. HANDS - Apprenticeship
3. HEART - Immersion
- Information
- Skills
- Fluency
Phases
of Learning
Relational Contexts
Look at some of the numbers in Luke/Acts:
- The '3'
3 Years
Suggests strong mentoring relationships
Suggests basic cell group community
(6 x 12) Suggests Missional Community outreach
(10 x 12) Suggests corporate base congregation
- The '12'
- The '72'
- The '120'
- The Crowds
Forming
Storming
Performing
Norming
"A common language is often the most obvious outward sign that people share a common culture… For this reason, groups seeking to mobilize their members often insist on their own distinct language… and according to some linguists, languages not only symbolize our culture but also help create a framework in which culture develops, arguing that grammar, structures and categories embodied in each language influence how its speakers see reality. For example, because Hopi grammar does not have past, present and future grammatical tenses, Hopi speakers think differently about time than do English speakers"
From

"Essentials of Sociology"
Quoted in "Buildiing a Discipleship Culture" - Mike Breen, 2011
A
D
C
B
A
Timeline of Processing Information
Oral Culture
1st Century
Today
Book Culture
Internet culture
1450s
Why Cell Groups?
A Cell Group was where Jesus Started
Church Growth Research Identifies Cell Groups as Key
“Our research in growing and declining churches all over the world has shown that continuous multiplication of small groups is a universal church growth principle…They must be holistic groups which go beyond simply discussing Bible passages…
If we were to identify any one principle as the most important
– even though our research shows that the interplay of all basic elements is important –
then, without a doubt, it would be the multiplication of small groups.

(Christian Schwarz "Natural Church Development" 1996:32-33
[bold print mine]
)
Mentoring
Social Space
Missional
Communities
Public Space
The Corps
Corps
Mentoring
Cell Groups
Missional
Communities
A and B
A B and C
A B C and D
Word
Cell Groups are almost certainly where the early church started
Steve Donahue
20th Century
Visual Culture
Jesus:
"As the Father has sent me, I am sending you"
John 20:21
[As you go]..."make disciples... teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you"
Matthew 28:19-20
The Church in Acts
Overcame Persecution
Penetrated the known World
Effectively Discipled
Changed Society
Adapted to new contexts
Trained Leaders
Priest and Temple
Rabbi and Disciples
Old Testament Model
New Testament Model
How do these two models differ?
(the '3000')
How do you change a culture?
Language
Leadership
Logistics
A Passion for the Broken
A Passion for Community
A Passion for Ministry
A Passion for the Lost
A Passion for Holiness
A Passion for Jesus
Challenge:
Can you remember the 6 values?
Neither Could We!
A Passion for Jesus
A Passion for Holiness
A Passion for Ministry
A Passion for Community
A Passion for the Lost
A Passion for the Broken
Mission
}
Worship
Discipleship
Relationships
}
But a compass always
keeps you travelling
in the right direction
But a compass always keeps you travelling in the right direction
These 'values' were not going to function as a culture-shifting 'compass'!
A Language for Mission
A Language for Discipleship
D
C
B
A
Hands
Heart
Head
Preaching
Priorities
Practice
Time
People
Money
Developed the right leaders
Unity in Missional Diversity
Regular Feedback and Reflection
Quarterly Celebration Sundays
A place for closer friends and family
A place for wider friends and acquaintances
A place for everyone else
D
C
B
A
A
D
C
B
Welcome
Worship
Part 1 - A Discipleship Vision

Part 2 - A Discipleship Journey
Part 3 - A Discipleship Structure
Learning Outcomes
Identify the link between discipleship and mission from the perspective of some key foundational biblical texts.
Evaluate the differences between a priest/temple model of missional teaching and a rabbi/disciple model.
Identify key discipleship principles from the ministry of Jesus which can be used to implement missional discipleship today
Learning Outcomes
To identify the three main influences on changing a culture and how to utilise them
To explain the way in which values underpin actions
To utilise a few key leadership and logistical principles to develop a missional discipleship culture within a congregation
Learning Outcomes
To be able to identify the various spaces in which discipleship and relationships flourish
To be able to assess the basic discipleship building blocks for a community
To be able to understand the difference in emphasis between a missional discipleship focussed corps and a programme driven corps
To identify cell church principles and their link to an effective missional discipleship process
Full transcript