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Movie Stunts

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by

Mary Helen

on 15 May 2014

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Transcript of Movie Stunts

The Science Behind
design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
Introduction
Jumping 100 feet from a 10-story building isn't that simple. Neither is crashing through a window of a house on fire. Although you see it happen on T.V. day by day, there's a word for these wild actions - stunts. Stunts consist of tons of practice, scientific materials and laws, and safety precautions before put on the big screen for all to see. This prezi will show you exactly what you're missing through the T.V. and how science causes stunts to look as if what we see is actually happening.
Vocabulary
Background Information
Fight Stunts
Stuntmen aren't
literally
hitting each other.
They're hitting but in a way that doesn't actually injure or hurt; it just looks so to the audience.
Cameramen use specific angles to make fake punches look like they are joined.
For stunts involving guns, bullets use "squibs".
Squibs are tiny explosive charges attached to the stuntman's body where needed. Above the squib is a tiny bag of theater blood.
Behind that is a metal plate that protects the squib and forces it to explode outwards.
The charges explode on cue either by a remote or by the actor pushing a secret button in his/her sleeve. It is timed to the fire of the "gun." (The fake gun that's supposedly real in a scene).
When the button is pressed, the charge rips through the actor's clothing and theater blood is released to resemble a real gunshot injury.
The guns are typically only props. They can easily create a loud noise without a real bullet.
Conclusion
Movie Stunts
By: Mary Helen Youseph
Ms. Kim
Period 9
5-16-14

Stunt - Any risky performance in a movie.
Stuntman/woman (Stunt double) - Trained professionals used for risky parts of movies.
Stunt coordinator - Professionals that inspect to confirm all equipment is secure before a stunt takes place.
Stunt performer
Johnny Depp's stunt double
James Bond Movies' stunt coordinator
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Early
1900s
1910
1960-70
2014
Stuntmen were people insane or hopeless enough to take the risk.
Pro stuntmen got better by trial and error.
Viewers developed a liking of suspenseful action movies.
Up to date stunt technology invented (air bags, air rams, bullet squibs).
Computer Generated Images (CGI) invented. This caused stuntmen to fear job loss.
Although CGI creates very lifelike images, it won't completely cross out stuntmen. Real stunts are (almost) always better for the viewer.
Stuntmen aren't insane people anymore, they are trained professionals who know exactly what they're doing.
Western stunt
by stuntman
Fred "Krunch" Krone
h
"How Stuntmen Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Mar. 2014. <http:/entertainment.howstuffworks.com/
Car Stunts
Human On Fire Stunts
Falling Stunts
A car chasing stunt may take weeks to completely finish filming.
Car chasing stunts are broken down into sections at a very slow pace.
Stunt drivers are clothed in protective gear.
The car to be used is rebuilt in a special way.
A metal frame inside of the car keeps the driver safe from an injury when the car rolls.
In order to make the car roll
1. A ramp springs up from ground as soon
as the driver clicks a button from within the car.
2. The ramp then shoves the car over.
This ramp can also be used when wanting to have a car leap.
"Cannon ram" - A metal tube is put carefully within the car. Within that metal tube is a thick pole, and a few explosives. When the driver pushes a switch, the explosives go off (fire). The pole then bangs into the ground. That force picks up and flips the car over.
Car roll
Car leap
Ramp
Most dangerous and risky type of stunt
Stuntman wears special protective gloves and a hood, along with many layers of clothing.
Skin-tight suit made of material that is unaffected by fire.
Movie costume goes on top of suit.
Costume is smeared with a substance that burns quickly and effortlessly.
No skin can be revealed to flames that doesn't wear gel.
Face masks may be worn so that he/she can breath.
Extreme human fire stunts typically last no longer than 15 seconds for safety precautions.
A special gel is smeared on the stunt performer so that the fire burns on the gel instead of the stuntman.
This gel helps the fire to have lots of flames in a short amount of time.
The gel is smeared on the stuntman's hair, hands, face, neck, and other skin that is not covered.
The gel is cold and unable to catch on fire easily.
Beneath clothing is a tiny breathing gadget that is connected to a small oxygen tank.
What is the gel made of?
The shine is the gel.
No exposed skin from head to toe unless smeared in gel.
Divergent fight scene
Building On Fire Stunts
Gasoline tanks are secretly put in building.
When the tanks begin to burn, flames are formed.
These tanks can be turned on/off from a secure distance.
Nonflammable material is laid out so that the tank does not expand.
On-set smoke devices can produce smoke without a fire. This type of smoke is safe to inhale.
A typical real-life building burns in less than an hour. A film house takes days and days to record.
After an explosion, a "kicker ramp" will release the stunt actor skywards. When a button is pressed, densely packed air forces the ramp upwards.
Fuel Tanks
There are two types of gel. . .
Thick version: Used in most professional type of stunt work. Will stay put and not fall off during major stunt body burns and explosions.
Thinner version: This version is suggested to be used with the thicker version for extra safety measures. The thin version helps to completely cover and soak the bodysuit 24 hours before the stunt is performed.
*Made all natural from lots of water
*Easily washable
*Heat-shielding
"Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel." Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2014. <http://www.zeller-int.com/categories/fireret/zeljel.htm>.

Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010. Print.

Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010
. Print.

Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Gordon, Nick. Stunt performer: 2013. Print.
"How Stuntmen Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2014. <http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/stuntmen1.htm>.

Hunger Games fight scene
Flying Stunts
Other
"How Stuntmen Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Mar. 2014. <http:/entertainment.howstuffworks.com/
These days, falls are typically computer generated.
If not, ropes are attached to the stuntman.
The ropes are digitally taken away from the movie afterward.
The landing of the fall is more safe due to hidden airbags, padded clothing, and cardboard boxes.
Airbags: The actor usually won't even have ropes attached with this method. One airbag is inside another. (2-part airbag). The outer airbag is soft, and is easier to sink into. If it was sturdy, then the stunt actor would bounce right off it and back into the air. The second air bag is much sturdier.
Although this may sound like fun, these kind of stunts are very risky and a possibility of death can be involved.
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
"How Stuntmen Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2014. <http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/stuntmen1.htm>.
Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010. Print.
Bibliography
A sturdy harness and ropes are secured to the stunt performer to lift and move them through the air for a flying affect.
A harness is attached underneath the costume worn by the stuntman.
The objective of the harness is to help swing the person across the air.
The straps of the harness fasten around the legs, waist, and chest of the stuntman.
There are clips that attach the harness to a wire.
The performer then slides against the wire. (Chris Daniels, the stunt double for Spiderman would act as if he was swinging from a spiderweb by moving his arms and legs around while attached to the wire that was digitally removed later on.)
Any safety equipment (wires, harnesses, clips, etc.) are digitally removed from the final picture.
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010. Print.
With airbag






With ropes
attached
A green screen is placed
in the background, and ropes are
ALWAYS
attached.
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
"How Stuntmen Work." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2014. <http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/stuntmen1.htm>.
Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010
.
Print
.
"Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel." Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2014. <http://www.zeller-int.com/categories/fireret/zeljel.htm>
"Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel." Zeller International - Zel Jel Stunt Gel. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2014. <http://www.zeller-int.com/categories/fireret/zeljel.htm>.
Gordon, Nick. Stunt performer: 2013. Print.
"Thanks for logging in." AMC Blogs Top Ten Actors Who Do Their Own Stunts Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. <http://blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2010/06/top-ten-actors/>.
A bunch of foam bricks can topple anyone without getting injured.
For rain, a pump pushes water up and over the set. There are many types of nozzles on the hose, each one forming different sized raindrops.
For snow, water vapor is sprayed into the air. As the water vapor contacts the freezing air, the water freezes into ice crystals, and they fall like snow.
Snow that doesn't melt is either permanent material (like cotton) or foam.
For wind, depending on how much wind needed, either a small fan, wind blower, or even a jet engine can blow lots of wind across the entire set.
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Glass Crashes
Safety glass is one of the glasses used for crashing through windows. It's typically made of sugar!
This type of glass will smash into small cubes to dodge any injury from happening.
Another type of movie glass is made of plastic.
This type of glass will smash without leaving sharp edges.
It also won't soften under the warm lights used to record movies, compared to the glass made of sugar, as explained above.
Regardless of the type of glass, the stunt performer wears protective clothing.
Both glasses break way more easily than normal glass.
Miles, Liz. Movie special effects. Chicago, Ill.: Raintree, 2010. Print.
Thomas, William. Movie stunt worker. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2010. Print.
This snow does not melt,
It is made of material like cotton or foam.

This prezi explained the science behind common movie stunts. It proved that science is involved in even the most
unexpected situations. From the fact that glass used in crashes is actually made of sugar or plastic, to how smoke can appear without a fire burning, this prezi consisted of many unbelievable facts we may have never thought of. Next time you watch an action-packed movie, think of how the hero is
really
"jumping" from building to building!
Cannon Ram
Full transcript