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Commonly Misused and Misspelled Words

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by

Yani Santos

on 17 September 2014

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Transcript of Commonly Misused and Misspelled Words

Whose




Forward







Imply:



Commonly Misused and Misspelled Words
Whose vs Who's
Your vs. You're
Your



Complement vs. Compliment
Complement:



Imply vs. Infer
Than vs. Then
Compare to vs. Compare with
Who's =




Relative Pronoun:
Interrogative Pronoun:
"Who is"
"Who has"
Ex.
John knows of a friend
whose
condo just went on the market.
Ex. Whose
condo is it?
Ex:
"The property is so close to
your
workplace, Sally!”
Possessive adjective
You're = You are





Contraction
Contraction
Ex:
“And it’s close to the gym
you’re
supposed to be attending, John…”
Base word:
Complete
Ex.
While the condo interior is newly renovated, Sally appreciates that the building exterior
complements
the older area in which it is located.
Compliment:



Ex.
John tries to
compliment
the real estate agent to have the price reduced, but it's a lost cause.
Foreword


a short introduction to a book
Ex.
Sally is really looking
forward
to moving in with John.
Ex.
John thinks it is necessary for himself and Sally to live together in order to move
forward
in their relationship.
to suggest something
Infer:



to conclude based on facts
Ex.
Based on the events of the story, we can
infer
that John and Sally will live happily ever after in their new home.
Ex.
Though moving in together has its’ stresses, the flowers John left for Sally
imply
it was a good choice.
Than



Then



Ex.
John is confident that he can do laundry better
than
Sally.
Comparison between two things
Adverb
Compare to




Ex.
Sally and John proceed to meet with the real estate agent
who’s
selling the condo.
Thanks
for
listening

Foreword vs. Forward
Ex.
Sally argues that if that were the case,
then
all of her clean clothes wouldn’t be half the size they used to be.


To compare similarities of dissimilar things.
Ex.
Sally
compares
the moving process
to
an intense boot-camp workout.
Compare with




To compare similarities or differences of similar things.
Ex.
John
compares
the amount of Sally’s clothes
with
that of a department store.
commonly used as adjective or adverb.
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