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Project Management and Teaming/Partnering

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Amirali Kani

on 19 July 2011

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Transcript of Project Management and Teaming/Partnering

Why Build a Team? Project Management and Teaming / Partnering Quiesha Wade
Louis King
Kerri Wells
Kwadwo Yeboah
Davar Ashtin Why Build a Team? “Synergy. Most teams have the potential to produce at a greater level than the sum of their individual parts” (Ronco).

“ To be a successful design-build team leader, the architect needs to appreciate the knowledge contributed by the contractor and balance his or her design orientation with issues of constructability, cost, and schedule” (Wilking).

Brainstorming(Ronco)

Motivation (Ronco)

Organizational link(Ronco)

Becoming rare for architecture firms to pursue projects without other firms to help them win (Moody)

“The need for teaming arrangements will only continue to intensify. In the past, many firms could pursue work alone and be successful. However, as it becomes more financially feasible to team and more skill sets are need to be competitive for projects, these firms must embrace teaming and build relationships with other firms” (Moody).

According to Atkinson of Holder Construction, early constructor involvement is an important component of meeting sustainable objectives (Atkinson)

“Owners that don’t understand the value of having a contractor on board early are often the same owners that do not have a high value placed on project sustainability” (Atikinson)

21 of 22 Contractor credits should be Low / No Cost (Atikinson) “Synergy. Most teams have the potential to produce at a greater level than the sum of their individual parts” (Ronco).
“ To be a successful design-build team leader, the architect needs to appreciate the knowledge contributed by the contractor and balance his or her design orientation with issues of constructability, cost, and schedule” (Wilking).
Brainstorming(Ronco)
Motivation (Ronco)
Organizational link(Ronco)
Becoming rare for architecture firms to pursue projects without other firms to help them win (Moody)
“The need for teaming arrangements will only continue to intensify. In the past, many firms could pursue work alone and be successful. However, as it becomes more financially feasible to team and more skill sets are need to be competitive for projects, these firms must embrace teaming and build relationships with other firms” (Moody).
According to Atkinson of Holder Construction, early constructor involvement is an important component of meeting sustainable objectives (Atkinson)
“Owners that don’t understand the value of having a contractor on board early are often the same owners that do not have a high value placed on project sustainability” (Atikinson)
21 of 22 Contractor credits should be Low / No Cost (Atikinson) Common Problem

Performance slippage
Individual negativity and passivity
Individual focus
Group think
Questionable ethics
Distance
Webex
Skype A Positive Team Environment
Ground rules
Partnering charter
Team identity built on commitment to a shared goal
The ability to listen
Ability to manage meetings
“Implementing appropriate processes. How often does the team meet? Who attends? Who takes notes? How do group members share information? Improving teamwork often requires the team to adopt more effective processes for everyday communications” (Ronco) The Art of Creating a Good Team Sample Partnering Charter We, the design-build team for [project], commit to the following:
• We will resolve issues at the lowest competent level in the decision-making hierarchy.
• We agree to determine time frames for each member with decision-making abilities to provide information in a timely manner.
• We agree to respect the other members’ expertise in all matters.
• We will earn the respect of members through professional behavior.
• We understand that change is to be expected and commit to resolving issues in a positive, proactive manner.
• We agree that each person responsible for their area of expertise will be obligated to communicate the content of the partnering charter to their team.
• We commit to making the work environment comfortable and enjoyable for others.
• We agree to be open to feedback without taking it personally. Goal s • We commit to a completion date of _____. On this date, the project will be substantially complete for the owner to occupy the project.
• We agree to communicate each day so that teamwork occurs among all members.
• We commit to providing the information each member needs to do the work.
• We commit to the owner’s budget of $_____ and will be proactive regarding cost and coordination issues.
• We commit that changes during the work will not exceed ______ percent of the project’s budgeted construction costs.
• We will personally be responsible for services provided.
• We commit to coordinating the work with other disciplines and trades on a daily basis.
• We commit to evaluating the success of the partnering charter on a weekly basis.
• [Partnering team signatures] Sample Teaming Agreement(Wilking) When the design-build team meets to create a teaming agreement, they address the following issues:
• The legal model under which the work will be performed
• Team organization and hierarchy
• The roles and responsibilities of each team member
• Whether the owner has secured adequate financing for the project
• Project budget (and whether it is realistic)
• If and when costs, losses, and profits will be shared
• Costs needed to prepare the proposal (should one be required)
• Management and accounting for the project
• Insurance needed for the project
• Whether bonding is required and, if so, where to secure it
• Exclusions to the contract that cannot be managed
• A noncompete clause for team members
• A confidentiality clause for team members
• Ownership and use of material if awarded (or not awarded) the project
• Licensing requirements in the project state
• Avenues for dispute resolution
• Job site safety during construction Team Identity Built on Commitment to a Shared Goal “In effective teams, members may or may not like each other. Team building can (and often should) be more focused on bottom-line team performance and productivity” (Ronco).
“For professional teams, team building is a form of practice. Like sports teams, professional teams perform at higher levels when they practice” (Ronco).
Goal must be clear
“We often find that interpersonal conflicts in architecture teams are really the symptoms of insufficient work done to clarify the team's vision, mission, and goals” (Ronco).
Present yourself as one team to the client(Moody)
Being fragmented creates confusion and could hurt your chances of winning
Customize the proposal by creating a template for all elements: resumes, project sheets, and response to look more unified
In relation to sustainability, a LEED goal must be set early in the project, and the factors for evaluating LEED should be clearly defined (Atikinson) Holder’s LEED Management Ability to manage meetings “Implementing appropriate processes. How often does the team meet? Who attends? Who takes notes? How do group members share information? Improving teamwork often requires the team to adopt more effective processes for everyday communications” (Ronco) Collaborative Problem-Solving Capability Problem-solving skills tied to an accepted problem solving process
Understanding and applying multiple decision modes
Conflict-resolution skills
“Conflict and disagreement can help make groups more effective at problem solving. Team building usually aims to help groups manage conflict more effectively, not to eliminate it” (Ronco).
Openly discuss (Moody)
Instead of blaming, resolve (Moody)
Avoid conflict in front of client (Moody
Most be a level of flexibility(Moody)
Continuous learning Leadership Attending to health of team

Do your homework: if you haven’t won the project yet, be sure to partner with people or organizations who’s strengths will help you win (Moody)

Develop a matrix of responsibilities (Moody)

Maintaining the strategic vision

Attending to the team members

Eating to lunch together

Common interest activities

Exhibiting and demanding accountability

Personal energy that inspires the team through example Reference Atikinson, Amanda. (2011, September 14). Sustainability and Project Delivery, Powerpoint Lecture Presented at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.
Moody,Kurt. (2009 October 16). Make the Most out of Your Teaming Partnerships. Retrieved from: http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek09/1016/1016p_moodynolan.cfm
Ronco, William C. (Winter 2009). Team Building for Architects: Myths, Strategies, and Tips. Project Management Digest. Retrieved from: http://info.aia.org/nwsltr_pm.cfm?pagename=pm_a_teambuilding
Wilking, Ben. (March 2006). Partnering and Teaming Improve Design-Build Success. Retrieved from: http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/ek_members/documents/pdf/aiap016387.pdf Thank
You! General Services Administration GSA
Case For Sustainability Trust – Members listen to, cooperate, support and respect each other
Shared Vision – Team understand and is committed to project goals with no hidden agenda
Good Communication – Members are kept informed, candor is the norm
Good Leadership – Team charter is developed and used, problems are solved instead of pointing blame Characteristics of Effective Teams Benefits of Sustainable Facility Management - Lower energy and water costs
- Lower environmental and emissions costs
- Lower waste disposal costs
- Lower waste disposal costs
- Increased productivity of building occupants
- Increased health of building occupants
- Higher building valuation TEAM GOAL SETTING and NEGOTIATING - Define Your Main Goal
- Clearly State Your Goal
- Involve the Whole Team
- Break the Goal Into Objectives
- Divide and Conquer BARRIERS TO TEAM NEGOTIATIONS - Failure to Listen
- Fear of Losing Face
- Pride
- Fear of Looking Foolish
- Failure to take Personal Responsibility for Outcome Case Studies 1 2 3 Partnering for Quality
Study No. 2: Birmingham Decent Homes Project Partnering for Sustainability
Study No. 3: Balfour Beatty North Region Headquarters Building the Case for Partnering
Federal mandate required elimination of all Combined Sewer Overflow facilities.
Elimination of the Greensferry Basin CSO was undertaken by the City of Atlanta in 2005.
In order to separate the Greensferry Basin Sewer, 56,700 linear feet of sanitary sewer lines and 381 manholes would need to be installed and over 900 new service connections made.
The sewer lines ran under historic neighborhoods, public parks, schools, and crowded streets. The city’s goal was to complete work with minimal disruption to the community.
In addition, the project faced a strict deadline. If not completed in four years, the federal government would impose a $1 million penalty. Greensferry Basin Sewer Separation Project Partnering for Schedule Control
Study No. 1: Greensferry Basin Sewer Separation Project Greensferry Basin Sewer Separation Project How Partnering Led to Success
City required regular team meetings
Team generated innovative solutions to construction problems
Washington Park
Agnes Jones Elementary School
Public Relations team kept communication open with affected communities
Project was delivered within schedule and 10% under budget
Won special recognition in the AGC’s 2010 Marvin M. Black Excellence in Partnering Award Birmingham Decent Homes Project Building the Case for Partnering
England implemented Decent Homes Standards to improve the quality of life of its citizens and the sustainability of its communities. Standards were to be met by 2010.
The Birmingham City Council is the largest public landlord in the United Kingdom with 70,000 homes. It owns almost 1/5 of the city’s housing stock.
2/3 of Birmingham’s housing fell below the Decent Homes Standards at the time of implementation.
The Birmingham Council Housing Improvement Programme was formed in January 2004. It included 5 years of projects worth over £500 million. Birmingham Decent Homes Project How Partnering Led to Success
Partnership had 3 main goals:
Move away from Design-Bid-Build to improve design & construction quality
Improve budget and schedule certainty
Reduce whole life costs, construction time, defects, and accidents & increase productivity
Close working relationship between Birmingham City Council and contractors freed Council to focus on customer satisfaction and increase quality of services provided to Birmingham residents.

Key Elements of Partnerships:
Customer choice
Customer Liaison Officers
Online Bidding
Commitment to health & safety training
Improved efficiency through data management
Weekly Review Meetings with all contractors and subs From 35% “decent homes” in 2004 to 93.5% in 2009
Missed 2010 target due to lack of government funding Balfour Beatty North Region Headquarters Building the Case for Partnering
Balfour Beatty wanted new office space to meet its 3 requirements:
Close proximity to its old office, public transportation, and a major roadway
Open Space
Environmentally-Friendly
Signed a 10-year lease with Lincoln Property Company for the 5th floor of Bridgewater Corporate Center (26,000 square feet)
Goal: To build state-of-the-art office space that would promote collaboration and educate employees and visitors on sustainability IPD for Sustainability
Project is 1 of a few dozen to be completed using all 5 AIA principles of IPD
IPD fit naturally with Balfour Beatty’s business practices and project goals

Key elements of partnership:
Established project goals and maximum allowable budgets and used process mapping early in project
Used digital program analysis and studied alternatives during program development
Utilized latest technology - BIM and digital laser scanning
Maximized small business participation
Project is delivered within budget and schedule and achieves LEED gold certification. Pursued credits from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors
-Daylight harvesting
-Reuse of existing furniture
-Use of local materials with high recycled content
-Recycling programs
-Green housekeeping
Also took advantage of LEED Innovation and Design pilot credits 5 & 6, which encourage the use of IPD to achieve sustainability goals
Technology allows daily carbon emissions and energy usage to be tracked
“IPD requires collaboration, engagement, transparency, and shared risks and rewards. It’s an extraordinary process that is transforming behaviors and project delivery.” – John Tarpey, Balfour Beatty North Region CEO Thank
You! Thank You! Case Study No. 2 Case Study No. 3 References
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