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AAD 640 extra shell

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UK Arts Administration

on 21 April 2016

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Transcript of AAD 640 extra shell

Unit
SHELL
1. Brief History of Philanthropy in the United States
2. The Three Economic Sectors and the nonprofit's role
3. Why do we have nonprofit organizations?
4. How big is the Philanthropic Sector?
Philanthropy in the United States has roots in religious beliefs
Hardships of early settlers forced people to undertake community activities: fighting fires, building schools, etc.
These community building activities grew into a culture of civic responsibility
Andrew Carnegie & John Rockefeller are credited as the first philanthropists to seek ways to combat problems, conduct research and promote science.
Benjamin Franklin is often credited as America’s first philanthropist by establishing Franklin Funds in Boston and Philadelphia to lend money to “young married artificers of good character." The fund made its final distribution of capital accumulation in 1991.
Corporate philanthropy began in 1935 under the Revenue Act.
Private Sector
Public Sector
Non Profit Sector
Private Good
Public Good
“Nothing, in my opinion, is more deserving of our attention than the intellectual and moral associations of America.” Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835
Historical
Market Failure (Private Sector)
Government Failure (Public Sector)
Pluralism/Freedom
Solidarity
Total giving to charitable organizations was $298.42 billion in 2011 (about 2% of GDP). This is an increase of 4% from 2010.
Individuals gave $217.79 billion (73%), representing a 3.9% increase over 2010.
9 out of every 10 dollars donated
Corporate giving accounts for 5% of the total giving in 2011
32% of all donations, or $95.88 billion, went to religious organizations (down 1.7%). The next largest sector was education with $38.87 billion (up 4%).
Areas of increased donations: healthcare (2.7%), public benefit (4%), arts, culture, humanities (4.1%), International (7.6%), human services (2.5%) and environmental and animal (4.6%).
Donations to foundations were down (6.1%)
Philanthropy in the United States has roots in religious beliefs
Philanthropy in the United States has roots in religious beliefs
Hardships of early settlers forced people to undertake community activities: fighting fires, building schools, etc.
Hardships of early settlers forced people to undertake community activities: fighting fires, building schools, etc.
These community building activities grew into a culture of civic responsibility
Benjamin Franklin is often credited as America’s first philanthropist by establishing Franklin Funds in Boston and Philadelphia to lend money to “young married artificers of good character." The fund made its final distribution of capital accumulation in 1991.
Benjamin Franklin is often credited as America’s first philanthropist by establishing Franklin Funds in Boston and Philadelphia to lend money to “young married artificers of good character." The fund made its final distribution of capital accumulation in 1991.
Historical
http://www.history.com/shows/men-who-built-america
http://www.history.com/shows/men-who-built-america
http://www.history.com/shows/men-who-built-america
WATCH: Men Who Built America
WATCH: Men Who Built America
WATCH: Men Who Built America
Corporate giving accounts for 5% of the total giving in 2011
Corporate giving accounts for 5% of the total giving in 2011
Areas of increased donations: healthcare (2.7%), public benefit (4%), arts, culture, humanities (4.1%), International (7.6%), human services (2.5%) and environmental and animal (4.6%).
Donations to foundations were down (6.1%)
Donations to foundations were down (6.1%)
Full transcript