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Nyx

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by

Micaiah Snyder

on 30 March 2016

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Transcript of Nyx



The Goddess of Thieves and Traitors

Nyx
Nyx
Nyx
_______
_______
Powerful
As one of the five primordial deities according to the Hesiod, Nyx has birthed and mothered many personifications from the beginning of time.
Such as....
Masterful
The
Masterful
________
Powerful
The
Powerful
________
Y
The Hesperides

(
Day Nymphs
)
The Moirai
(
Fates
)
The Keres
(
Death Spirts
)

Hypnos
(
Sleep
)

Momus
(
Blame
)

Apate
(
Deceit
)

Philotes
(
Friendship
)

Geras
(
Old Age
)
Nemesis
(
Retribution
)
Who is Nyx?
Who is Nyx?
Nyx is the goddess and personification of the night.
Her name describes how her
dark light falls from the stars
and dictates to men and also the gods. As the stories go, not even Zeus wanted to upset Nyx for
fear of her wrath. Nyx, or "The Night" isn't talked about much,
but she is still one of the
most powerful goddesses mentioned in Greek
mythology.

The Mother
Where Night Lays
Nyx lived in Tartarus, which was considered both a place and the name of her brother. The stories say that at and above the gates of Tartarus are the sources and ends of heaven, earth and sea. It is said that if a man found himself inside the gates, it would take a year to find the bottom and he would be carried by blasts in all directions. Here is where Night lives with her daughter, Day. The myths say that when one, either
night or day, crosses the earth, the other will wait
at home. They will greet each other only at
the threshold where Atlas holds
up heaven.

Erebus
(
Darkness
)

Hemera
(
Day
)

Aether
(
Brightness
)

Thanatos
(
Death
)

Moros
(
Destiny
)

Ker
(
Destruction
)
Where she came from
The exact origin of Nyx is unknown. Some sources say that she is the daughter of Eros and other sources say that both she and Eros are children of Chaos. Some sources even say that Nyx is the mother of Eros and that she laid a germless egg in the bosom of Erebos and the golden-winged
Eros was born (after many
long ages). And in
The Orpheus, she is the
first principle from
which all creation
emerges, not
Chaos
Her Followers
All those who favor mischief and misdeeds are said to get along great with Nyx. Stories of treachery often involved the black-winged Nyx and her dark doings. It is said that
during the Trojan war, it was Nyx who protected
the spies. It is also said that she is with
fugitives and thieves who escape
or move about in the night
doing evil deeds.
Homer
In The Iliad, Nyx plays a main part in the story, and shows how powerful she was - powerful enough to confront Zeus.
Hypnos, the minor god of sleep and son of Nyx, had
once before put Zeus into slumber at the bidding of Hera, allowing her to cause Heracles (who was returning by sea from Laomedon's Troy) great misfortune. Zeus was furious and would have smitten Hypnos into the sea if he had not fled to Nyx, his mother, in fear. Homer goes on to say that Zeus, fearing to anger Nyx, held his fury at bay and in this way Hypnos escaped the wrath of Zeus by appealing to his powerful mother.
Summary
All in all, Nyx didn't take part in many stories, but still was a very important part of Greek society, much like Hestia - the goddess of the Hearth. Nyx protected and showed mercy to those who lie, cheat, steal, and deceive. No other God or Goddess had such emphasis on how it was "okay" to trick people, as long as you manage to get out of punishment for it. Nyx was also a good goddess who provoked inspiration and was sung about by the Muses at nighttime. In this way she shows us that in Greek society
thieves, cheaters, and liars weren't horrible criminals that were
shunned and chased down, but actually had their own place in
the Greek system. They had a good goddess to
worship, and were able to pray for a swift
pick-pocketing or a convincing lie.
Full transcript