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Pemulwuy

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Carys Fisser

on 13 June 2013

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Transcript of Pemulwuy

Pemulwuy:
The rainbow warrior

What did Pemulwuy do to rebel against the British and how did these actions improve Australia?
Bibliography
What did Pemulwuy do to rebel against the British?
What were the outcomes of these actions?
How were these actions an improvement?
Who was Pemulwuy?
What was Australia like at the time for Pemulwuy's people?
What was Australia like at the time for Pemulwuy's people?
Who was he and what was Australia like at the time?
Pemulwuy was an Aboriginal leader at the time the British Colony arrived
Pemulwuy belonged to the Eora Tribe, and he and his tribe attacked and rebelled against the British colonies
He first came to the settler's attention in 1790, when Pemulwuy speared John McIntyre in the shoulder.
This was only the beginning of many attacks
Pemulwuy died in 1802, and his head was sent to England.
Life as an Aboriginal was tough, due to the settler's belief in Eugenics and 'Terra Nullius'
The theory of Eugenics said that some races were superior to others, and the British thought themselves as the superior and the Aborigines as the inferior
This gave them an excuse to maltreat and take advantage of Aborigines
The settlers also claimed the entirety of Australia as 'Terra Nullius'. This meant that anyone could walk onto a plot of Australian land and take it forcibly from the Aborigines
The little rights Aboriginals had were manipulated by the British so that they meant nothing.
Pemulwuy provided hope for a better future for the Aboriginals
Pemulwuy alerted the colonies to the fact that the Aborigines would not simply roll over and not resist, but would continuously rebel against them and their rules.
Pemulwuy caused the British to begrudgingly respect the Aboringines for their persistence and intelligence.
'He was a brave and independent character.
Disproved theory of Eugenics
Pemulwuy organised large scale guerrilla attacks against the British.
These were highly organised and well orchestrated, and many settlers lost food, money, clothes and livestock at the Pemulwuy's tribe's hands.
He led his tribe into many wars against the British, most of which were successful.
Pemulwuy helped to disprove the theory of Eugenics, by showing that he was not inferior to the British in in anyway. This was shown in the way that it took a decade for the British to finally kill Pemulwuy, presenting the two races as equal.
This later led to the settlers give Aboriginals proper rights and treating them as equal.
Banner, S. (2007). Possessing the Pacific: Land Settlers, and Indigenous People from Australia to Alaska. America: Harvard University Press.
Collaborating for Indigenous Rights 1957-1973. (2008). Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://indigenousrights.net.au
Karksens, G. (2010). The Colony: A History of Early Sydney. New South Wales: Allen & Unwin.
Kohen, J. (2005). Pemulwuy (1750-1802). Australia: Australian Dictionary of Biography.
Pemulwuy. (2010). Retrieved May, 19, 2013, from http://www.convictcreations.com/history/pemulwuy.htm
Perkins, R. L. (2008). First Australians. Victoria: Melbourne University Publishing.
Russell, J. C. (2012). Pemulwuy. Australia: Books on Demand.
Smithies, G.W. (2003). Australian Aboriginal Culture. Sydney: R.I.C. Publications.
Wicken, W. (2002). Mikmaq Treaties on Trial: History, Land, and Donald Marshall Junior. University of Toronto Press.
Full transcript