Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Charlotte o'Neil's song

No description
by

Chloe Donovan

on 18 December 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Charlotte o'Neil's song

Introduction
This presentation is about the poem
Charlotte O'Neil's Song
by Fiona Farrell. I'm going to analyze this poem with basic information, structure, rhyme, tone & mood, and then a conclusion.
Charlotte O'Neil's song
1.You rang your bell and I answered.
2.I polished your parquet floor.
3.I scraped out your grate
4.And I washed your plate
5.And I scrubbed till my hands were raw.

6.You lay on a silken pillow.
7.I lay on an attic cot.
8.That's the way it should be, you said.
9.That's the poor girls lot.
10.You dined at eight
11.And I slept till late.
12.I emptied your chamber pot.
13.The rich man earns his castle, you said.
14.The poor deserve the gate.


First stanza-Analysis
"1.You rang your bell and I answered.
2.I polished your parquet floor.
3.I scraped out your grate
4.And I washed your plate
5.And scrubbed till my hands were raw."
Second stanza-analysis
6.You lay on a
silken pillow.
7.I lay on an
attic cot
.
8.That's the way it should be, you said.
9.That's the poor girls lot.
10.
You dined at eight
11.
And I slept till late
.
12.I emptied your
chamber pot
.
13.The rich man earns his castle, you said.
14.The poor deserve the gate.
Third stanza-analysis
15.But I'll never say
'sir'
16.Or 'thank you
ma'am'
17.And I'll never curtsey
more.
18.You can bake your
bread
19.And make your
bed
20.And answer your own front
door.
Fiona Farrell
Charlotte O'Neil's song
was written by a poet called Fiona Farrell. Fiona Farrell, is a New Zealand poet, fiction writer and playwright. This poem was written in 1987.
Charlotte o'Neil's song
15.But I'll never say 'sir'
16.Or 'thank you ma'am'
17.And I'll never curtsey more.
18.You can bake your bread
19.And make your bed
20.And answer your own front door.

21.I've cleaned your plate
22.And I've cleaned your house
23.And I've cleaned the clothes you wore.
24.But now you're on your own, my dear.
25.I won't be there any more.
26.And i'll eat when I please
27.And I'll sleep when I please

28.And you can open your own front door.
When I read this stanza, I immediately knew that it was about someone working for another person such as their master or owner etc...
From line 1-4 its explaining how the maid (Charlotte O'Neil) works for her master/s. On line 5 it shows us that she does not have a choice in what she's doing and that it wasn't a nice thing to be doing.
As said in this second verse, Charlotte sleeps in an attic cot whiles her master sleeps on a silken pillow. The contrast between the master and the employer herself is really strong because it shows us how poorly the maid is living compared to the master's rich and wealthy life.
An attic cot is an uncomfortable, cold, bed shaped object that maids (such as maria) were had to sleep in.
This poem was written based in the Victorian times, and having a silken pillow would show your wealth.
A chamber pot is a pot for people to pee in at night when they don't bother walking to the bathroom. It is kept under your bed and pulled out when needed. Otherwise, a hole can also be carved into your bed so you can use your chamber pot whiles laying in bed.
This verse shows rhyming. It also explains how Charlotte is starting to stand up for her own rights and no longer wants to be treated the way she was. She's not excepting the fact that she doesn't have equal rights to others and she is determined to make a change to it. The 15th and 16th line give it away that she will not longer give respect to her master.
Fourth stanza-analysis
21.
I've cleaned
your plate
22.And
I've cleaned
your house
23.And
I've cleaned
the clothes you wore.
24.But now you're on your own, my dear.
25.I won't be there any more.
26.And
i'll
eat when I please
27.And
I'll
sleep when I please
This verse has a lot of reputation to show Charlotte's determination to what she stands for. By reading the whole poem you can easily tell that by this point Charlotte is fed up with the way things are and that she is no longer respectful to her master. Charlotte also seems to be complaining at this point as well.
Fifth stanza-analysis
28.And you can open your own front door.
On the last line of the poem, Charlotte finally makes her point clear. She's done.
Thanks for watching
Full transcript