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A Touch is Worth a Thousand Words

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by

Corey Webster

on 28 January 2013

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Transcript of A Touch is Worth a Thousand Words

Touch Darwin & Friends Darwin understood relatively little about the human brain due to the lack of technology at the time The Social Brain Hypothesis theorizes that primates have larger brains than all other mammals because they live in incredibly complex social structures.

• Deeply bonded to one another (more than most other species)

• Species with big brains tend to live in large social groups

• Big brains live in monogamous paired relationships/friendships  ...today----> On the same scale, humans appeal to a group size of 150
Modern military structure in 150 person companies
People with limited frontal cortex tend to be more socially inept; incapable of holding their tongues, blurt things out
Critical to maintain relationships with face-to-face contacts—relationship will decay without eventual physical contact
Facebook, only having 120-130 actual friends regardless of number of facebook friends
HuMans For boys, relationships are maintained by doing things together;
girls, by talking to one another
My Bright Idea: Dunbar Interview Considers biological evolutions as capacity to do things, not the expectation/requirement to fulfill them

There are layers outside and within the 150 group-size number (Dunbar Number) that dictate how many people how many people you can know beyond associating a face with a name 150 Monogamy Something computationally very demanding about maintaining monogamous lifelong relationships
Lifelong monogamous birds must have large brains
Medium brained birds stay monogamous for a year
Promiscuous birds typically have small brains Important notes: •Previously the number represented 150 characters on top of each other (everyone sharing the same 150). Now, everyone has a different 150 (about 25% overlapping max, even with spouse) and they are spread about the globe
•“In biology there is no such thing as universal law; …flexibility is what the whole game is about, that’s why you have a brain in the first place”
•“Digital revolution is going to cut through…constraints that limit our social world simply because of time and access”
via social media, you can talk to several people at once and therefore spread your communication circles more efficiently
What does it mean for the future? “Digital means help us keep in touch when separated, but in the end we have to get together and do stuff face-to-face”

“In the end real face to face interactions rely heavily on touch… maybe once we can [simulate touch over the web], we will crack a big nut”

-Dunbar •Average village size in the whole of England about 150
•Dates back only to existence of modern humans
•Group living is contingent upon group solutions to problems of survival
•Key evolutionary strategy of primates WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDSWORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS WORDS Charles
Darwin
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