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Touchstone 2, Unit 5: "Growing UP"

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joseph carrier

on 4 November 2014

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Transcript of Touchstone 2, Unit 5: "Growing UP"

"Growing Up"
Unit 5
WARM-UPs
Lesson A: "Childhood"
Lesson B: "Favorite Classes"
Think about when you were a child... maybe when you were five or six years old. I want you to think about a very happy memory you have from those days.
Take a few minutes to write about that time and share what you have written with your partners.
What was the name of your best friend when you were growing up. Answer the following questions and share with your partner:
What was her or his name?
What were they like (physical description and personality)?
What did you enjoy doing together?
GRAMMAR TIME!
The SIMPLE PAST is one of the most frequently used verb tenses. It is used:
to talk about events in the past which are finished and happened at a specific time.
As a child, I spoke Chinese at home.
with a past time expression.
I lived there until I was five.
when a past time period is understood from the conversation.
How long did you live there?
GRAMMAR TIME!
Time expressions are often used with the simple past to talk about the duration of events or points in time.
for (prepostion)
for + a period of time
I lived there for six years.
I lived there for a long time.
I haven't been here for years.
in (preposition)
in + a specific point in time (ex. month/year)
I left the United States in 2008.
She started her new job in March.
from _____ to _____ (prepostions)
used with SPECIFIC points in time
(ex. months/years)
I taught there from May to July.
I lived in the US from 1970 to 2008.
ago (adverb)
time expression + ago
(ex. "ten years ago" or "three days ago"
I moved to Korea six years ago.
The bus left five minutes ago!
until (conjunction)
until + clause with a SPECIFIC point in time.
I lived there until I was 38.
I stayed with her until she died.
I worked until I couldn't stay awake anymore.
until (preposition)
until + specific point in time
I lived there until 2008.
I taught that class in April.
then (adverb)
(and) then + a sentence or clause
I lived in the US. Then I moved to Korea.
I lived in the US, and then I moved to Korea.
when (conjunction)
when + clause
I left home when I was seventeen.
I broke up with her when I found out she was a lying tramp.
Page 45 Activity 2A

1. A. Was / born
B. were /
in
2. A. did / live / Did / grow up
B. grew up /
until
3. A. was / were
B. was / were /
for
4. A. Did / argue / did / fight
B. didn't fight / didn't /
for
5. A.
when
/ were / Did / have
B. worked / was /
when
/ got /
when / wasn't /
long
6. A. Did / get / did / do
B. got /
when
/ was /
for
/
Then
/
made
Page 45 Activity 3A

CHILDHOOD VACATIONS
1. Did you go on any special trips?
2. Where did you usually go?
3. How long did you stay there?
4. Who did you go with?
5. Did you have a good time?
6. What did you do there?
Discuss these questions with your partner.
"(for) long" vs. "(for) a long time"
"(For) long" is used in questions and negative statements, but not in affirmative statements.
Did you live there (for) long?
We didn't live there long.
"(For) a long time" is used in affirmative statements.
We lived there for a long time.
TIME EXPRESSIONS
GRAMMAR TIME
DETERMINERS
Determiners are used as "quantifiers." They are placed before nouns to tell "how much" or "how many" of something we are talking about.
General Statements: Determiner + noun
FORM: all / most / a lot of / some / a few / no
+ a plural noun
All high schools have math teachers.
A lot of people don't like math.
No students like exams.
Most students drink beer on Friday night.
"
No
" can also be used before singular nouns.
No student likes exams.
Specific Statements: (determiner +
of
+ determiner + noun)
FORM: all of / most of / a lot of / some of / a few of / none of +
other determiner
+ noun
All of
Most of
A lot of
Some of
A few of
None of
my
friends drink beer on Friday night.
Exception: Only the determiner "all" can be used without "of":
All my friends drink beer on Friday nights.
Specific Statements with object pronouns
FORM: determiner +
of
+ object pronoun
All of
Most of
A lot of
Some of
A few of
None of
you
them
us

studied for the final exam.
Other determiners used with quantifiers in this way are:
the, my, your, this, that.
"All people..." or "No people..." are never used. Instead, native speakers will use everyone/everybody or noone/nobody.
All people love dancing.
Everyone loves dancing.
Extra Practice Activity Lesson A (P. 144)
Extra Practice: Lesson B (P. 144)
FUN QUIZ TIME!
DOWNLOAD THIS APP ON YOUR SMART PHONE (IF YOU DON'T HAVE IT ALREADY):
Socrative Student
Open the app and type in this room number:
0cebb695
When the quiz begins enter your ID NUMBER.
Full transcript