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Papacy and the Church/State during the Middle Ages

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Mary Haasl

on 6 March 2013

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Transcript of Papacy and the Church/State during the Middle Ages

Papacy and the Church/State during the Middle Ages Eastern Schism Division between the East and West branches of the Church (1054) Western Schism Theological, sociological, linguistic and political differences Reduces spiritual and moral prestige Marks end of United Christendom Eastern Schism (1054) Structure of Eastern and Western governments of the Church The Great Schism "It is altogether necessary for salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman Pontiff"
-the Unam Sanctum of Bontiface "All past trials of the Church appear to revive, all her future crises exist in embryo in this unfortunate schism"
-Louis Salembier (1907) Theological Differences Pope Leo IX and Patriarch Michael Cerularius Sacking of Constantinople Continues today Background:
Clement V moves papacy to Avignon (France) Western Schism Gregory XI dies: Election of Urban VI (Roman Line) Cardinals meet in Anagi:
Election of Pope Clement VII (Avignon line)- 2 popes Three Decade Division Council of Pisa: depose of Gregory VII and Benedict VIII and elect Alexander V (3 popes) Council of Constance: Remove all three popes and elect Martin V (1417) Effects on the Papacy in Medieval Europe Reduced moral and spiritual prestige of papacy Shatters belief that popes are unblemished rulers Rome no longer as unquestioned authority Development and transition of Church as a whole Papacy and
the Church /State during
the Middle
Ages - Julia Lavenger - Mary Haasl - Madeline Burbank - The Great Schism "It is altogether necessary for salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman Pontiff"
-the Unam Sanctum of Bontiface "All past trials of the Church appear to revive, all her future crises exist in embryo in this unfortunate schism"
-Louis Salembier (1907) Works Cited "A Political Church: The Great Western Schism and the Decline of Christendom." Tolle Lege RSS.
N.p., 16 Oct. 2011. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.
"The Western Schism." Great Schism. N.p., May 1997.
Web. 05 Mar. 2013.Yakupov, Oleg.
"Great Schism." Orthodoxy in America. N.p., 2012. Web. 05
Mar. 2013. Eastern Schism Division between the East and West branches of the Church (1054) Western Schism Theological, sociological, linguistic and political differences Reduces spiritual and moral prestige Marks end of United Christendom Eastern Schism (1054) Structure of Eastern and Western governments of the Church Theological Differences Pope Leo IX and Patriarch Michael Cerularius Sacking of Constantinople Continues today Background:
Clement V moves papacy to Avignon (France) Western Schism Gregory XI dies: Election of Urban VI (Roman Line) Cardinals meet in Anagi:
Election of Pope Clement VII (Avignon line)- 2 popes Three Decade Division Council of Pisa: depose of Gregory VII and Benedict VIII and elect Alexander V (3 popes) Council of Constance: Remove all three popes and elect Martin V (1417) Effects on the Papacy in Medieval Europe Reduced moral and spiritual prestige of papacy Shatters belief that popes are unblemished rulers Rome no longer as unquestioned authority Development and transition of Church as a whole Löffler, Klemens. "Conflict of Investitures." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 8. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. 5 Mar. 2013 "People & Ideas: The Roman Catholic Church in Medieval Europe." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013. "The Medieval Papacy by Thomas F.X. Noble." The Medieval Papacy. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013. Timeline of the Medieval Papacy 3rd C. =
institution established -8/9th C. = Alliances with France and Germanic kingdoms - Around 1000 = Great Schism (Roman Catholic vs. Eastern Orthodox Split 11th C. = Investiture Controversy 12/13th C. =
"Papal Monarchy" 1378-1417 =
Western Schism Conclusion:
Alliance
Separation
Investiture
Schisms Investiture Controversy Investiture Controversy Twin Powers of Authority? GAME THRONES O
F PLAYER SELECT Outcome & Significance vs P1 P2 secular religious investiture: the appointment of a religious official by a monarch political significance symbolic significance ............................................................... ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... King Henry III King Henry IV King Henry V Minor Antipopes Anitpopes St. Gregory VII Blessed Victor III Blessed Urban II Paschal II
1099-1118 Gelasius II
1118-1119 Callistus
1119-1124 1088-1099 1086-1087 1072-1085 Rudolf of Rheinfelden
1077 Theodoric 1100
Aleric 1102
Maginulf 1105 Guibert (Clement III)
1080-1100
Burdin (Gregory VIII)
1118 Papacy=supreme authority in Christendom Expansion of serfdom Concordat of London
1107 Concordat of Worms
1122 Germany France England 1075-1022 CE
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