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Animal Welfare Legislation B

International & Laboratory animal welfare legislation
by

Carrie Ijichi

on 19 April 2016

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Transcript of Animal Welfare Legislation B

Animal
Protection Index
http://api.worldanimalprotection.org/
Your Case Studies
What
did you pick &
why
?
Summary
Animal Welfare
Legislation

19th Century Lab Welfare
Yesterday we...
Next week we will be...
Learning Outcomes
Judge the effectiveness of current national and international legislation regulating animal welfare
Aims
Explore International legislation in comparison to UK law
Explored the
Animal Wefare Act 2006
including -
Looked at a brief
history of welfare legislation in the UK
Which animals are
protected
How
responsiblity
for an animal is determined
The principle
restrictions
and
offences
The promotion of welfare
Prevention of Harm
Animals in Distress
Look at legislation concerning laboratory animals
Do you think this highlights
better
or
worse
welfare standards than the UK?
What
was your source?
Do you think this is a
fair reflection
of the country featured?
Judges
50 countries
on their
policy
and
legislation
for animals, identifying where improvements can be made to protect animals and peple
Looking at how
housing affects animal welfare
Looking at the
assignment brief
in detail
Directing work for
study week
Recommended Reading
"Animal Welfare" Appleby et al (2011)
Chapter 19
Spend time looking at the interactive Animal Protection Index to understand world rankings and indicators
The use of dogs in scientific experiments played an important in the discovery of
digestive system function
and particularly the function of enzymes and hormones and disease such as
insulin
and
diabetes
.
Physiological demonstration with vivisection of a dog. Oil painting, 1832
Originally
un-policed
and in a time of
voracious
learning and experimentation.
Large numbers
of animals were used
Species that
we
wouldn't find acceptable were used
Experiments caused
unnecessary suffering
in some cases
BUT, this was the dark ages for medical science and
human subjects
were often harmed by their doctors
Animals Act 1986
(Scientific Procedures)
Primary legislation
separate to the Welfare Act
to regulate the use of lab animals in the UK
Applies to anything that could cause
pain
,
suffering
,
distress
or
lasting harm
Again, only applies to
vertebrates
&
cephalapods
Regulated by the
Home Office
whose inspectors visit research establishments & assess license applications
You need 3 licences to conduct this
type of research:
Certificate of designation
project license
personal license
Before the 1986 Act
This picture was taken in 1975 by controversial undercover investigative journalist
Mary Beith
.
48 dogs were forced to smoke 30 cigarettes a day to investigate the effects of new, safer cigarettes
The picture went
straight to the front page
and sparked
massive public protest.
Despite repeated trialling, this method
did not
link
smoking with lung cancer, though later
patient
records did
.
Battersea Park's little brown dog...
The 3 Rs
Replace
if there is a
non-animal replacement
it must be used
Reduce
Use the
minimum number of animals
necessary to obtain
meaningful results
Refine
Design experiments to
minimise suffering
Humane Killing
Often, animals needs to be euthanised at the end of experiments for two main reasons -
the experimental conditions will have
affected the animals
which might
confound the results
of any further experiments they were involved in
the experiment itself has had a
negative impact
on the animal's welfare and it is
ethical
to destroy them
There are lists of appropriate methods for
each
species
according to
age
and
bodyweight
Staff must be
trained
,
competent
and
confident
Handling must be
firm
but
careful

and
sympathetic
Research is monitored very carefully
Deviation from licensing and general legislation leads to
prosecution
with a sentence of up to
5 years imprisonment
A great deal of thought goes into
granting licenses
and
forming legislation
with significant consideration of
ethical principles
Therefore, whilst many of us would not
choose to take part in invasive research,
we should be
very careful
about
judging those who do...
Now, it is time...
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https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/229022/0193.pdf
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/research-and-testing-using-animals
Full transcript