Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Victims of The Great Gatsby

No description
by

renzo cortes

on 30 July 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Victims of The Great Gatsby

In the novel,
The Great Gatsby
, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
Myrtle Wilson
Catherine continues discussing Tom and Myrtle's relationship with Nick
Tom has clearly thoroughly developed the lie he is telling Myrtle about his intentions, indicating that he may have used the same lie before for other women
Myrtle is not be enough to realize that she is being taken advantage of by Tom
She is a victim here, even though she is also cheating, because Tom knows Myrtle is delusional and so he can do whatever he wants. This is further proven when he breaks Myrtles nose
The Great Gatsby
Seminar

Victims of
The Great Gatsby

Catherine is talking to Nick at the apartment about Tom and Myrtle
Tom appears to have told Myrtle that he must stay married to Daisy, despite how much he would like to marry Myrtle, because Catholics cannot divorce, "It's really his wife that's keeping them apart. She's a Catholic, and they don't believe in divorce"
Tom is lying to Myrtle because he does not want to marry her, he just wants to use her, and cheat on his wife
Myrtle is a victim of Tom's deception, because she does not realize that she is being used, and Tom is only pretending to actually care about her
She is delusional about Tom's intentions
She is deceived by Tom about why he can't get divorced
George Wilson
He is delusional about the eyes of T.J. Eckleburg
He is deceived by Tom about the death of his wife
Jay Gatsby
Gatsby is delusional about his ability to get Daisy back
He is the victim of Tom's deception of George Wilson
George Wilson
Jay Gatsby
Myrtle Wilson
"She lowered her voice again, 'It's really his wife that's keeping them apart. She's a Catholic, and they don't believe in divorce.' Daisy was not a Catholic, and I was a little shocked at the elaborateness of the lie.
(Fitzgerald 36)
'When they do get married,' continued Catherine, 'they're going west to live for a while until it blows over.'
(Fitzgerald 36)
Why do you think that Tom is cheating on Daisy with Myrtle, when Daisy is wealthier and more attractive than her?
Why do you think Myrtle continues the affair with Tom, even after he breaks her nose?
Many people see Daisy as a victim in The Great Gatsby because she is a product of her generation, and her wealthy upbringing, while others believe, “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy- they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” Which side are you on? Do you think we should have used daisy instead of Myrtle for our first victim?
"'I spoke to her,' he muttered, after along silence. 'I told her she might fool me but she couldn't fool God. I took her to the window' - with an effort he got up and walked to the rear window and leaned with his face pressed against it - 'and i said "God knows what you've been doing, everything you've been doing. You may fool me, but you can't fool God!"' Standing behind him, Michaelis saw with a shock that he was looking at the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg, which had just emerged, pale and enormous, from the dissolving night. 'God sees everything,' repeated Wilson."
(Fitzgerald 152)
George Wilson's wife has just been killed, and he is sitting incoherent in his office with Michaelis for the night
He is telling Michaelis about his wife's affair, but he is not making any sense
George is looking into the eyes of T.J. Eckleburg on the billboard, but he is talking as if he is talking to God, "saw with a shock that he was looking at the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg"
George Wilson is a victim of his own delusions about the sign being God, and it leads him to killing Gatsby and himself
He is also a victim of the deception of his wife, "You may fool me..."
She was of course cheating on him, but he did not realize it until midway through the book
Do you think that George Wilson killed Gatsby in a fit of rage and despair, or in a calculated revenge?
"'I told him the truth,' he said. 'He came to the door while we were getting ready to leave, and when I sent down word that we weren't in he tried to force his way upstairs. He was crazy enough to kill me if I hadn't told him who owned the car. His hand was on a revolver in his pocket every minute he was in the house -' He broke off defiantly. 'What if I did tell him? That fellow had it coming to him.'"
(Fitzgerald 169)
Nick has just confronted Tom about how George Wilson got to be shooting Gatsby in his pool at his house
Tom admits that he told Wilson that it was Gatsby's car, 'He was crazy enough to kill me if I hadn't told him who owned the car'
George is a victim of Tom's deception, because, even if he didn't realize he was not telling the truth, Tom led George to killing Gatsby and himself
Why do you think George went to Tom's house for information about his wife's killer? He would have had to go past West Egg to get there, and Gatsby lived in West Egg.
Nick mentioned that George probably would have gone garage to garage looing for a yellow car, "On the other hand, no garage man came forward who had seen him, and perhaps he had an easier, surer way of finding out what he wanted to know." This indicates that Nick had suspicions that Tom would tell George about Gatsby. Why do you think he had these suspicions? Tom would have had no reason, in Georges eyes, to know anything about it.
"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . "
(Fitzgerald 171)
Nick is describing Gatsby's unending optimism, even in the face of complete defeat
Gatsby's optimism was so intense that it could actually be seen as delusional
Gatsby was a victim of his own delusions, because even though Daisy had completely rejected him in the end, he did not give up hope, and ended up dead as a result
If Gatsby had seen George coming with his gun, do you think he still would have acted like he hit Myrtle with the car, even facing death as a result? Why or Why not?
"He was crazy enough to kill me if I hadn't told him who owned the car. His hand was on a revolver in his pocket the every minute he was in the house -" He broke off defiantly. What if I did tell him? That fellow had it coming to him.'"
(Fitzgerald 169)
Tom is admitting to Nick what he said to George, that the car belonged to Gatsby
Even though Tom did not realize that he was bringing about Gatsby's death, he said, "That fellow had it coming to him"
This shows that even if Tom knew what he was doing, he would have done it anyway
Gatsby is a victim of Tom's deception because Tom knowingly or unknowingly deceives George into thinking that Gatsby killed Myrtle
Is Tom a hypocrite? He cheats on his own wife, then sends George to kill Gatsby for it.
Is it fair to say that all of the victims in The Great Gatsby are victims of Tom and Daisy? What do you think this says about Fitzgerald's message in the book?
Is a victim of his own delusions about the billboard, and of Tom's deception.
Is a victim of her own delusions about Tom's intentions, and of Tom's lies.
Is a victim of his own delusions about Daisy's feelings for him, as well as Tom's deception of George Wilson
Conclusion
Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims in The Great Gatsby of a combination of their own delusion, and the deceptions of others. Myrtle deludes herself by thinking that Tom will marry her, and Tom lies in confirmation of this. George is delusional in seeing the eyes of T.J. Eckleburg as the eyes of God, and it leads to his death, but he is assisted by Tom's lying. Jay is delusional in his unending optimism, and while he is not specifically deceived, he is a victim of Tom's lies.
Works Cited
Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key.
The Great Gatsby
. London: Penguin, 1950. Print.
Myrtle
Gatsby
George
Victims
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby are all victims of deception and delusion.
The Great Gatsby Scene - Gatsby Death. Youtube. Google, 23 Aug. 2013. web. 29 July 2015.
<https://www.yout ube.com/ watch?v=WfNE-p TRTH8>.
Full transcript