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Emily Davison

Emily Davison, mad woman or martyr?
by

Ajay Sharma

on 3 May 2011

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Transcript of Emily Davison

Emily Davison Mad woman or Martyr? General Info Emily Wilding Davison was born in Blackheath in London on the 11 October 1872.She studied at the Royal Holloway College even though women were not allowed to take degrees at that time.She was the daughter of Charles and Margaret Davison, with two sisters and a brother.
Women's Rights She was appalled at the lack of opportunities women had in Victorian society but she was especially angered by being denied the right to vote. A very wealthy female land owner could not vote at the end of the nineteenth century but many of her male staff could - the most obvious example being Queen Victoria who believed that women should not involve themselves in politics. The point of this, according to the Suffragettes, was that this denial of the right to vote made them second class citizens. This particular aspect of discrimination greatly angered Emily Wilding Davison.
Thank you for Watching! Emily Davison became a natural follower of the Suffragettes. She took part in attacks on property. She became a leading member of the Suffragettes and was imprisoned and force-fed. On one occasion she barricaded herself in a prison cell to escape force-feeding. Her cell was flooded with ice cold water which drenched her while workmen broke down the cell door. This kind of treatment only made her even more determined.

On another occasion while in prison, she threw herself off of a prison upper gallery floor. She was badly injured but realised that a Suffragette dying in prison would look bad for the authorities. So what was to say she wouldnt do something suicidal like this again to make the authorities look bad?
The Suffragettes Emily Davison became a natural follower of the Suffragettes. She took part in attacks on property. She became a leading member of the Suffragettes and was imprisoned and force-fed. On one occasion she barricaded herself in a prison cell to escape force-feeding. Her cell was flooded with ice cold water which drenched her while workmen broke down the cell door. Such treatment only made her even more determined.

On another occasion while in prison, she threw herself off of a prison upper gallery floor. She was badly injured but realised that a Suffragette dying in prison would look bad for the authorities - who were to respond to this real threat by the introduction of the Cat and Mouse Act.

The Derby The Derby took place on June 4th 1913. The Derby is not only a horse race. In some senses, the race is about the social importance of this event. In 1913, it was a race where society's elite turned up, including the Royal family who traditionally had a horse entered into it. Because of its importance, it attracted a very large crowd to the Epsom Race Course.
In the 1913 Derby, the king entered a horse called Anmer.
As the horses rounded Tattenham Corner, Anmer was third from last. Emily Wilding Davison got underneath the barrier and threw herself in front of Anmer. The horse went over. Emily Davison took the full force of a sprinting race horse hitting her. The impact took her clean off the ground.
So what really happened? Confusion took over to start with. Some believed that Davison was trying to cross the race course and had failed to see that not all the horses had cleared the course. It was a tradition that once the horses had gone past, the crowd went onto the the course to walk down to the finish.

Other spectators claimed that they heard a woman shout "Votes for Women" before leaping out in front of the king's horse.

A crude black and white film was taken that caught the event 'live'. On its own it shows little as it has poor clarity. It has now been enhanced and it shows clearly that Davison stopped in front of Anmer (therefore she did not want to simply cross the course) and it appears that she tried to make a grab for the reins of the horse but the speed of Anmer and the impact on her were so great that she took a blow to her upper body.

Jones (the jockey) did what all jockeys are trained to do. Having come off his horse, he stayed where he was until all the back riders had gone past. He was taken off the course by stretcher and taken to the ambulance room at the back of the Grand Stand. His injuries included a fractured rib, a bruised face and slight concussion. He stayed the Wednesday night at the Great Eastern Hotel in Liverpool Street, London, but by Friday was back in Newmarket where he was described as "quite cheery". Jones did say that he saw Davison trying to grab his reins. Anmer, having gone over, got to his feet and completed the race minus his jockey. The "Times" the next day commented that the horse had suffered bruised shins.

Emily Wilding Davison was very badly injured. She was taken to Epsom Cottage Hospital. She never regained consciousness and it appeared that her heart was damaged in the impact. On the Wednesday evening, the king enquired as to Emily's well being but the doctors there realised that she had been seriously injured. They called for Mr. Mansell Moullin, a consultant surgeon at London Hospital, to assist them. But it was to be in vain as Emily Davison died on June 8th 1913 from substantial internal injuries.
My View I think that Emily Davison did not want
to die but she simply wanted to disrupt the race and cause awareness for the cause. I think this as there is video evidence of her walking towards the horse but trying to grab the reins. If she wanted to kill herself then she would have just jumped in front of the horse. I think it was just a publicity stunt gone wrong.
They also recovered her diary from her bag which showed that she had planned meetings for the following week and she had a reurn train ticket
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