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Handel - And The Glory Of The Lord

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by

Pearl Cook

on 4 March 2014

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Transcript of Handel - And The Glory Of The Lord

Background
He Died 14th April 1759 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
Handel was German but lived in England.
'And the Glory of the Lord
' is the fourth movement from the
oratorio 'Messiah'
(1741)
Structure
The structure is based around the 4
Motifs
(ideas) in the piece.
Features of Baroque Music
Image by Tom Mooring
Messiah
Handel - And The Glory Of The Lord
George Frideric HANDEL was a German-British Baroque composer.
He was born on the 23rd February 1684 in Germany.
Handel made a living from composing operas and
oratorios.
The Baroque period was 1600-1750.
Tonal -
Major/ minor keys
Ornamented
melodic parts
Bass Continuo -
played by the harpsichord and cello
Different musical textures -
Monophonic
,
homophonic
and
Polyphonic
.
Terraced
Dynamics - contrasting dynamic on two levels - Loud and Soft.
One
'affection'
or mood is set for the whole piece.
Baroque orchestra is mainly strings.
What is an Oratorio?
Large scale religious work for chorus, soloist and orchestra.
In oratorios there were:
Arias
- vocal solo with orchestral accompaniment.
Recitative
- Sung speech that tells a story.
Chorus
- choir that is soprano, alto, tenor, bass.
It is
sacred
music.
Motif 1:
"And the glory of the lord..."
First sung by Altos at bars 11-14.
At this point the texture is
monophonic
.
It is

syllabic -
each syllable has a different note.
Bars 14- 16 now has Soprano,tenor and bass joining in.
This Makes the texture
Homophonic
(Chordal).

Motif 2:
"Shall be revealed..."
This motif is introduced by the tenors from bar 17-20
The word 'revealed' is
melismatic -
syllables spread over several notes.
There is also
imitation
of this motif throughout the choir.
The texture is now
polyphonic
.
Motif 3:
"And all flesh shall see it together..."
Introduced by alto part at bars 43-46
The texture is now
monophonic
.
This melody is repeated 3 times to make up this motif.
Motif 4:
"For the mouth of the
Lord hath spoken it..."
Introduced by the tenor/bass part in bar 51-57.
It is the only motif that is introduced by 2 parts.
Most of this motif is on the same note, this is an example of a
Pedal Note
- sustained note, usually in the bass.
Instrumentation
The Orchestra was made up only of strings: Violin 1, Violin 2, Viola, Cello and
Harpsichord.
Choir/Voices: Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass.
Dynamics
Terraced
dynamics are used as instruments did not have a good
dynamic range.
The only dynamics used are forte and piano.
Tempo
Allegro
- Lively/fast, makes the piece sound joyful.
Last four bars are
Adagio
(at a slow tempo) this gives the effect of a grand ending.
Texture
- Instruments often
double
vocal line although usually at different octaves.
-
Contrasts
are created by the use of the single voice in contrast with the whole choir.
- Alternates between
homophonic
and
contrapuntal
textures, but there are a few short
monophonic
sections.

- Handel often combines different motifs to create
polyphonic
textures.
Tonality
The tonality is major throughout the whole piece.
Starts in
A major.
Then
modulates
to
E major
- the dominant key.
It modulates again to
B major
- the dominant of the dominant.
It then returns back to
A major
(the
tonic key
) and that's the key the pieces end in.
Rhythm and Time Signature.
Time signature of 3/4 throughout.
Use of
Hemiola
- puts beats into 2's.
Piece also ends with a
plagal cadence
-

Sounds like an "Amen"
Motif 1: A simple rhythm, with a dotted crotchet- quaver rhythm in the second bar.
Motif 2: Dotted rhythm sequence.
Motif 3: A repeated crochet quaver, quaver, crochet figure.
Motif 4: Contains long dotted crotchets, expressing seriousness of the word.
That's it.
Full transcript