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Harlem Renaissance

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Marilynn Blair

on 24 October 2014

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Transcript of Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance
(1917-1935)
Marilynn Blair

It all started with..
The Great Migration
In 1890 African Americans began to migrate in large numbers from the southern states towards the northern states in search of jobs and more opportunities.
Northern states had industrial towns with many factories who were looking for employees.
As they all came together they realized that they've all been through rough times and found
pride in their culture
which brought the Harlem Renaissance.
It was a time for a Cultural Movement
(Harlem, NY)
African Americans finally had the freedom to express themselves and their talents.
Talents were shown through art, poetry, music, literature and other means of self expression.
A Timeline during the
Harlem Renaissance
Instruments
The brass and woodwind instruments, trumpets, trombones and saxophones were the instruments that were used the most during the Harlem Renaissance
Map of the Great Migration

Musicians
Music through Harlem

Popular Dancers
Josephine Baker
Billy "Bonjangles" Robinson
The Nicholas Brothers
Dances
This dance called the Lindy Hop was the most popular dance of this era, other dances such as The Charleston, jazz and tap steps, ballet, and steps from Viennese waltz were influenced by the Lindy Hop.
Billie Holiday
Duke Ellington
Marian Anderson
Ella Fitzgerald
Louis Armstrong
Artists and their work

Aaron Douglas
Lois Mailou Jones
Jacob Lawrence
Writers and Poets
Wallace Thurman
“Being a Negro writer these days is a racket and I'm going to make the most of it while it lasts. About twice a year I sell a story. It is acclaimed. I am a genius in the making. Thank God for this Negro literary renaissance. Long may it flourish!”
(Thurman,1932,
Infants in the Spring, pg. 230
-Primary Source)
Langston Hughes
Democracy

Democracy will not come
Today, this year
Nor ever
Through compromise and fear.

I have as much right
As the other fellow has
To stand
On my two feet
And own the land.

I tire so of hearing people say,
Let things take their course.
Tomorrow is another day.
I do not need my freedom when I'm dead.
I cannot live on tomorrow's bread.

Freedom
Is a strong seed
Planted
In a great need.

I live here, too.
I want freedom
Just as you.

(Langston, 1949)
Primary Source
Zora Neale Hurston
"Dat's a big ole resurrection lie, Ned. Uh slew-foot, drag-leg lie at dat, and Ah dare yuh tuh hit me too. You know Ahm uh fightin' dawg and mah hide is worth money. Hit me if you dare! Ah'll wash yo' tub uh 'gator guts and dat quick."
(Quote from Zora Neale Hurston's novel, Jonah's Gourd Vine, pg.3, 1934) Primary Source

Performers

Paul Robeson
Florence Mills
Cab Calloway
Lena Horne
Intellectuals/Activists

Marcus Garvey
A. Philip Randolph
W.E.B Du Bois
Paul Robeson
Impacts of the Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance came to an end due to the Great Depression but not without leaving a great impact on the world.
The music made during this time period is still used today, hints of it are mostly used for soul, R&B, hip-hop, rock and roll and even rap.
Inspired the world to create more artistic expression.
Black excellence- gave African Americans more confidence in themselves and their talents.
The literature developed during this time taught the world about the inequalities African Americans faced. It also motivated many African Americans to pursue education and to continue fighting for their rights.
Civil Rights Movements
More African American activists and political figures.
African Americans were finally recognized world wide and earned a large audience that helped their movements in later years.
It helped African Americans feel a sense of pride for their culture and race.
Information source- "The Harlem Renaissance." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
What Led to the
Harlem Renaissance?
Prior to the Harlem Renaissance, African Americans suffered through centuries of slavery.
After slavery was abolished in 1865, white supremacy took over the south.
Jim Crow laws (racial segregation laws) were put in effect in 1876.
Hate crimes occurred in high numbers in the south.
African Americans were given less and less opportunities to advance (could not own land, difficult to find employment, difficult for children to have equal opportunities for education, loss of right to vote.)
African Americans migrated to northern cities: primarily Detroit, Chicago, Harlem
W.E.B. DuBois
Types of Music
Blues
Jazz
Classical
Symphonic
The first African American to receive a Ph.D. in the subject of history from Harvard University.
Professor of sociology at the University of Atlanta.
Activist for African American people- worked for the NAACP as the editor and writer for their magazine The Crisis.
He urged African Americans to move to the northern states from the southern states.
The Souls of Black Folk
"Herein lie buried many things which if read with patience may show the strange meaning of being black here in the dawning of the Twentieth Century. This meaning is not without interest to you, Gentle Reader; for the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line."
(WEB DuBois, pg. 9, 1903 )Primary Source
(Great Migration Map. Digital Image.
The Great Migration.
11 Oct 2014
.
http://www.fordlearning.com/the-great-migration.html)
Harlem 1924
Map of Harlem- "Map of Harlem." Harlem Renaissance. Ed. Christine Slovey and Kelly King Howes. Vol. 1. Detroit: UXL, 2001. xxix. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
School boy- Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web.
No work- "Jim Crow Era." Jim Crow Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Water Fountain- "Lesson Plan: Overview." Why Jim Crow? N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

(Harlem,NY in the 1920's - Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web.
Thank you!
Timeline- "Harlem Renaissance Timeline." Harlem Renaissance Timeline. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.
Music during the Harlem Renaissance- "Music of the Harlem Renaissance." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Musician and Dancers Pictures- Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.
Instrument picture- "Musical Instrument: Wind Instruments." -- Kids Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.
Harlem Renaissance Dance YouTube video- "Lindy Hop Black Teens." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Oct. 2014.
Musician and Dancers Pictures- Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.
Artists and Art- "Artists." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.
Infants of the Spring- "Infants of The Spring." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Writers and poets- "Writers and Poets." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.
Zora Neale Hurston - "Jonah's Gourd Vine." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct.2014
Performers- "Drama." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.
Activists- "Leading Intellectuals." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Dubois -"The Souls of Black Folk." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Information source- "The Harlem Renaissance." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Blair, 1
Works Cited

"Artists." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.

Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.

Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web.

"Harlem Renaissance Timeline." Harlem Renaissance Timeline. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.

"Harlem Renaissance." International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences. 2008, "Harlem Renaissance." Dictionary of American History. 2003, "Harlem Renaissance." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th Ed.. 2014, and "Harlem Renaissance." World Encyclopedia. 2005. "Harlem Renaissance." Encyclopedia.com. HighBeam Research, 01 Jan. 2008. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.

"The Harlem Renaissance." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Infants of The Spring." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Jim Crow Era." Jim Crow Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Jonah's Gourd Vine." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct.2014

"Leading Intellectuals." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Lesson Plan: Overview." Why Jim Crow? N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Lindy Hop Black Teens." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Oct. 2014.

"Map of Harlem." Harlem Renaissance. Ed. Christine Slovey and Kelly King Howes. Vol. 1. Detroit: UXL, 2001. xxix. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Musical Instrument: Wind Instruments." -- Kids Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.

"Music of the Harlem Renaissance." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"The Great Migration." More Opportunities to Learn Through Technology. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"The Souls of Black Folk." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

"Writers and Poets." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.
"The Harlem Renaissance." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
Information source- "The Harlem Renaissance." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, n.d. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
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