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Emoji's in the Twenty-First Century

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by

Heather Wulff

on 12 March 2016

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Transcript of Emoji's in the Twenty-First Century

Emojis in the Twenty-First Century
Introduction to Emojis
Survey Questions:
1-3
Demographics
Concluding Remarks
How emojis are used
today

30.4%
- several times a day
33.5%
- several times a week
15.9%

- several times a month
12.5%
- several times a year
7.6%
- once a year or less
How Often
Do People Use
Emojis
?
Only for
Millennials
?
Under 25
- 94.4% are users
25-29
years old - 96.6% are users
30-35
years old - 92.7% are users
35+
years old - 91.9% are users
Every year, the Oxford Dictionaries announces a Word of the Year
The word is chosen based on its rise of popularity and usage while also best representing the year as a whole
In the year 2015, a very unusual "word" was announced as the winner
The winner for the 2015 Word of the Year was... (drum roll please)
...seriously.
The "Face with Tears of Joy" Emoji
Males or Females?
Frequent users stated that
emojis
are better at expressing their emotions better than
words
About
60%
of women
use emojis frequently.
About
41%
of men use
emojis frequently.
Sparking Controversy
To no surprise, the selection of this emoji as Word of the Year has sparked some controversy in the general public
Some are outraged that a picture was selected instead of a word
Others don't even see emojis as part of our language
No matter what one may believe, the popularity of emojis is certainly on the rise and their everyday usage is irrefutable
It is time now to really consider what makes a language a language and see if emojis fit the definition
The word "emoji" is a newer word to the English language
It first appeared in Japanese writing in the 1990s
It was first introduced in the Oxford English Dictionary in December of 2013
It is a loanword from Japanese language meaning "a small digital image or icon used to express an idea, emotion, etc., in electronic communications."
The word itself breaks down to "e" meaning 'picture' and "moji" meaning 'letter, character'
AMERICAN-ENGLISH
American

English
uses
emojis
from Female-oriented, Royalty, Tech, LGBT, and Meat categories the most.
FRENCH
French speakers use the
heart
emoji four times more than the average users.
55% of emojis sent from French speakers are
heart
emojis.
RUSSIAN
Russian speakers used three times as many
Romantic
emojis than the average user.
7%
of all of the emoji usage is romantic.
AUSTRALIAN-ENGLISH
Australian-English uses twice as many
Alcohol
emojis than the average.
0.80%
of emojis are beer, wine, or cocktails.

This emoji is used to signify "laughing so hard that you cry" and is frequently used in texting conversations in conjunction with "haha" and "lol"
It took the world by storm in 2015, being the most used emoji globally according to data from SwiftKey
It represented 17% of all emojis used in the U.S. and 20% of all emojis used in the U.K.
Communicative Functions of Language
Ideational Function
It's reasonable to assume that he/she loves hamburgers
Emojis can do this...
Osiris Aristy, in 2015, got arrested for posting this on social media:
Prosecutors treated this the same way as if he wrote "gonna shoot a cop"
Questioned whether he was trying to incite violence
The charges were eventually dropped, but emojis, like words, can and will be used against you in the court of law
to get an idea idea across
I love you
It's raining
Emojis satisfy this function
If someone posts on social media...
Interactive-Interpersonal Function
To use language to influence the ideas and attitudes of others to change the environment
Mundane Processes: "Can you take the trash out?" or "Can you close the door on your way out?"
More significant: "I now pronounce you husband and wife."
Works Cited
Another
Qualification:
Signs
While Emojis have improved the means of conveying emotion without a physical presence or face-to-face interaction, there is still plenty of room for miscommunication and misinterpretation. With this said, the people have spoken that Emojis may be a social language in the sense of a general agreement of common understanding, but not necessarily a language in the linguistics structure definition of a language. Furthermore, Emojis are paving the way for alternative universal communication.
Languages use signs (a physical representation) to represent an idea...
Dog
No causal relationship between the sign and the idea; allows for flexibility within language
Baby
Gorilla
Emoji's are restricted: must visually resemble the idea they represent
However, some English signs have a causal relationship as well
Onomatopoia

Buzzzzz
1
.In society today would you consider emoji's a form of language?

2.
What is the most used emoji on your phone and what does it mean to you?

3
.What meaning do each of these five emoji's have for you?
2.
3.
4.
5.
Survey on
Emoji's

1.
We took a sample of 100 UC Davis Undergraduate Students and asked them 3 questions on Emoji's.
By asking the following questions, we got to see what people think of emoji's and how they interpret their meaning.
Why?
Data Analysis for Q.# 1:
Data Analysis for Q.# 2:
Data Analysis for Q.# 3:
THE "FACE WITH TEARS OF JOY" EMOJI
The Data reported:
65%
said yes emoji's are a form of language
35%
said no emoji's are not a form of language
From the
65%
that said emoji's are a form of language:
56%
were woman
44%
were men
Age range of those who responded yes:
16-17 years old:
100%
18 years old:
72%
19 years old:
53%
20 years old:
54%
21 years old:
73%
The
top 3
most used emoji's:
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The most common interpretation:
66% - Sarcasm
45% - Awkward
34% - Extremely upset
36% - Frustrated
76% - Flirtatious
Face with Tears of Joy
Red heart
Thumbs Up
Smirking Face
Grinning Face
Crying Face
Tired Face
Upside down smiley face
http://tinyurl.com/z4bewl9
http://tinyurl.com/z4bewl9
http://tinyurl.com/z4bewl9
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/11/emoji-language/
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/press-releases/announcing-the-oxford-dictionaries-word-of-the-year-2015/
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/word-of-the-year-faq/
http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/infographic-emojis-are-becoming-preferred-communication-tool-across-demographics-167355
http://www.scribd.com/doc/262594751/SwiftKey-Emoji-Report
http://allthingslinguistic.com/search/emojis+as+a+language
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/11/word-of-the-year-2015-emoji/
http://tinyurl.com/pjk4948
http://tinyurl.com/poojytk
http://tinyurl.com/poojytk
http://tinyurl.com/poojytk
http://tinyurl.com/poojytk
http://tinyurl.com/h2vwzqf
http://tinyurl.com/h2vwzqf
http://tinyurl.com/h2vwzqf
http://tinyurl.com/qftcy6x
http://tinyurl.com/pqznfb3
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